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Book Review: You Should See Me in a Crown by Leah Johnson

Publisher’s description

Becky Albertalli meets Jenny Han in a smart, hilarious, black girl magic, own voices rom-com by a staggeringly talented new writer.

Liz Lighty has always believed she’s too black, too poor, too awkward to shine in her small, rich, prom-obsessed midwestern town. But it’s okay — Liz has a plan that will get her out of Campbell, Indiana, forever: attend the uber-elite Pennington College, play in their world-famous orchestra, and become a doctor.

But when the financial aid she was counting on unexpectedly falls through, Liz’s plans come crashing down . . . until she’s reminded of her school’s scholarship for prom king and queen. There’s nothing Liz wants to do less than endure a gauntlet of social media trolls, catty competitors, and humiliating public events, but despite her devastating fear of the spotlight she’s willing to do whatever it takes to get to Pennington.

The only thing that makes it halfway bearable is the new girl in school, Mack. She’s smart, funny, and just as much of an outsider as Liz. But Mack is also in the running for queen. Will falling for the competition keep Liz from her dreams . . . or make them come true?

Amanda’s thoughts

It’s probably not enough to just write a little love note, like, “Dear book, I love you. Love, Amanda,” and consider this review done, is it? Or maybe it is. It gets across the point—I love this book. It’s cute, sweet, and fun while still dealing with serious and upsetting things. It made me remember all the best things about high school romances—the many firsts, the excitement, the joy, the fun.

The Twitter-like app Campbell Confidential catches every important bit of high school drama at Liz’s school. And now that she’s in the running for prom queen, she’s gone from an under-the-radar wallflower who’d rather evaporate than get attention to someone who’s suddenly SEEN by so many people. Liz has always felt so different from her classmates, who are mainly white and rich, and while she has a small, tight group of friends, she’s never been one to mingle with her peers. Until now. Liz finds herself teaming up with and becoming friends with classmates she never thought would like her, connecting with her old best friend, and, yes, falling for a super cool and interesting competitor for that prom queen crown.

But it’s not all fun and hijinks. Liz, who is being raised by her grandparents as her mother died from sickle cell and her dad was never in the picture, constantly worries about money. She worries about the health of Robbie, her younger brother (who also has sickle cell). She feels manipulated and betrayed by Gabi, her best friend, who takes this prom queen candidacy VERY seriously. And, Liz is gleefully falling for Mack, but since she isn’t out to anyone at school beyond her small group, she wants to keep things on the down low, especially because she’s worried that coming out in her small Indiana town would be met with homophobia that could keep her from winning the prom queen crown, and thus keep her from the scholarship money she so desperately needs.

The best thing about this book is how REAL it feels. Liz and friends all mess up. They make bad choices, hurt each other, apologize, and learn what true friendship looks like. The connection and acceptance and support that eventually shines through in this story shows all the best parts of high school and the best parts of people. As Liz fumbles her way toward the prom court, she learns that maybe playing the game differently is the key to it all. And with the encouragement of her friends and the eventual support of her peers, Liz comes to understand that if they won’t make space for you, demand it.

A smart, fun, and sweet look at navigating the unexpected moments and at celebrating being yourself.

Review copy (ARC) courtesy of the publisher

ISBN-13: 9781338503265
Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date: 06/02/2020
Age Range: 12 – 17 Years

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