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How to Get Out of Handcuffs and Other Things You Need to Know to Write a Mystery Thriller: The Murder Teen Interviews YA Author April Henry

As you may know, teen contributor Riley Jensen is interested in becoming a forensic scientist. Last Thursday, she interviewed prolific YA author April Henry over Zoom. Ms. Henry was very gracious to talk with The Murder Teen and answer her questions about writing a mystery/thriller novel for teens. It’s a fascinating conversation that talks about research and devolves into a very in depth conversation about how one can get out of handcuffs. Now Riley wants practice handcuffs and a lock picking set for her upcoming birthday, so there’s that.

April Henry’s 25th novel The Girl in the White Van releases tomorrow, July 28th. The interview is posted for you below. I tried to close caption the video for the first time to make it accessible and I hope that works correctly.

About The Girl in the White Van

A teen is snatched after her kung fu class and must figure out how to escape—and rescue another kidnapped prisoner—in this chilling YA mystery.

When Savannah disappears soon after arguing with her mom’s boyfriend, everyone assumes she’s run away. The truth is much worse. She’s been kidnapped by a man in a white van who locks her in an old trailer home, far from prying eyes. And worse yet, Savannah’s not alone: Ten months earlier, Jenny met the same fate and nearly died trying to escape. Now as the two girls wonder if he will hold them captive forever or kill them, they must join forces to break out—even if it means they die trying.

Master mystery-writer April Henry weaves another heart-stopping young adult thriller in this story ripped straight from the headlines.

Coming July 28th, 2020 from Henry Holt & Company

About April Henry

New York Times-bestselling author April Henry knows how to kill you in a two-dozen different ways. She makes up for a peaceful childhood in an intact home by killing off fictional characters. There was one detour on April’s path to destruction:  when she was 12 she sent a short story about a six-foot tall frog who loved peanut butter to noted children’s author Roald Dahl. He liked it so much he showed it to his editor, who asked if she could publish it in Puffin Post, an international children’s magazine. By the time April was in her 30s, she had started writing about hit men, kidnappers, and drug dealers. She has published 25 mysteries and thrillers for teens and adults, with more to come. She is known for meticulously researching her novels to get the details right. 

Find out more about April Henry and her books at her webpage.

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