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What’s New in LGBTQIA+ YA May 2018

tltbutton7It’s time for another roundup for new and forthcoming YA (and sometimes not YA) books featuring LGBTQIA+ characters.  The titles I’m including here have LGBTQIA+ main characters as well as secondary characters (in some cases parents), as well as anthologies that include LGBTQIA+ stories. Know of a title I missed in this list? Or know of a forthcoming title that should be on my radar for an upcoming list? Leave a comment or tweet me @CiteSomething. This list covers May 2018 titles. Head over to this link for the previous post (April 2018) in this series. All annotations here are via the publishers/Goodreads. I also have a 2017 master list and am working on one for 2018. I’m happy to send you the list if you’re interested. Tweet at me or email me to request the list. I’m amanda DOT macgregor AT gmail DOT com.

Looking for more information on LGBTQIA+ books or issues? Check out the hashtag here on TLT and go visit YA Pride and LGBTQ Reads, two phenomenal resources. 

 

May 2018

 

ship itShip It by Britta Lundin (ISBN-13: 9781368003131 Publisher: Freeform Publication date: 05/01/2018)

CLAIRE is a sixteen-year-old fangirl obsessed with the show Demon Heart. FOREST is an actor on Demon Heart who dreams of bigger roles. When the two meet at a local Comic-Con panel, it’s a dream come true for Claire. Until the Q&A, that is, when Forest laughs off Claire’s assertion that his character is gay. Claire is devastated. After all, every last word of her super-popular fanfic revolves around the romance between Forest’s character and his male frenemy. She can’t believe her hero turned out to be a closed-minded jerk. Forest is mostly confused that anyone would think his character is gay. Because he’s not. Definitely not.

Unfortunately for Demon Heart, when the video of the disastrous Q&A goes viral, the producers have a PR nightmare on their hands. In order to help bolster their image within the LGBTQ+ community-as well as with their fans-they hire Claire to join the cast for the rest of their publicity tour. What ensues is a series of colorful Comic-Con clashes between the fans and the show that lead Forest to question his assumptions about sexuality and help Claire come out of her shell. But how far will Claire go to make her ship canon? To what lengths will Forest go to stop her and protect his career? And will Claire ever get the guts to make a move on Tess, the very cute, extremely cool fanartist she keeps running into? Ship It is a funny, tender, and honest look at all the feels that come with being a fan.

 

 

schooledSchooled by Jeff Adams (ISBN-13: 978-1-64080-191-2 Publisher: Harmony Ink Publication date: 05/01/2018)

Codename: Winger: Book Two

Theo Reese is a high school student who’s also a secret agent. Usually those lives are kept separate, but now he must be both at once.

Theo lends his expertise to his school’s computer science club as they gear up for a competition, but his talents are also required by the covert agency he works for. Someone has stolen an encrypted key that can allow them to control the nation’s energy grids. The possibilities are catastrophic unless Theo and his team can reclaim the file.

Theo locates the file in an unexpected place—the computer science competition. As Winger, his secret identity, he must recover the file and keep his teammates safe from the unscrupulous thieves…. But can he do it without revealing his secrets? He can’t blow his cover, especially with so many of his classmates around.

 

 

queen underneathThe Queen Underneath by Stacey Filak (ISBN-13: 9781624145605 Publisher: Page Street Publishing Publication date: 05/08/2018)

In a city on the brink of war, it isn’t a king that the people need to save them—but a thief queen from Under.

Yigris is a world divided—where aristocrats in Above rule from grand palaces, and thieves, sex workers, and assassins reign in the shadowy tunnels of Under. When the leaders of Above and Under are both murdered on the same night, the fissure between the two opposite worlds grows and suspicion threatens to break the tenuous peace.

Gemma, a former orphan-thief and new queen of Under, and Tollan, heir to the Above throne, must salvage a truce to rescue the city. But they soon discover that the conflict is far bigger than two murders, as the city falls into an enchanted sleep and a cage of deadly brambles slowly ensnares the streets, buildings, and tunnels of both districts. With the fate of Yigris at stake, only Gemma and Tollan have the power to prevent another civil war from tearing their world apart forever.

 

 

girl made ofGirl Made of Stars by Ashley Herring Blake (ISBN-13: 9781328778239 Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publication date: 05/15/2018)
For readers of Girl in Pieces and The Way I Used to Be comes an emotionally gripping story about facing hard truths in the aftermath of sexual assault.Mara and Owen are as close as twins can get, so when Mara’s friend Hannah accuses Owen of rape, Mara doesn’t know what to think. Can her brother really be guilty of such a violent act? Torn between her family and her sense of right and wrong, Mara feels lost, and it doesn’t help that things are strained with her ex-girlfriend, Charlie. As Mara, Hannah, and Charlie come together in the aftermath of this terrible crime, Mara must face a trauma from her own past and decide where Charlie fits into her future. With sensitivity and openness, this timely novel confronts the difficult questions surrounding consent, victim blaming, and sexual assault.

 

 

 

alphaAlpha Wave by Andrew Demcak (ISBN-13: 978-1-64080-193-6 Publisher: Harmony Ink Publication date: 05/15/2018)

The Elusive Spark: Book Two

Keira Fairchild is running for her life, and she won’t make it far without someone watching her back.

Her powers helped her elude a slave trader, Holcomb, who planned to sell her to the highest bidder, and the deadly Paragon Academy. But now Keira needs some allies and some answers. Who is the imprisoned alien being who keeps contacting her in her dreams? Keira is aided by a group of teens—James, Lumen, and Paul—with powers like her own, and all of them are ready for a fight. The small group must rescue the captive alien and escape Dr. Albion, who seeks to steal their abilities and eliminate them. Survival will mean a desperate struggle, and none of them can succeed on their own.

 

 

 

love andLove & Other Carnivorous Plants by Florence Gonsalves (ISBN-13: 9780316436724 Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers Publication date: 05/15/2018)

A darkly funny debut for fans of Becky Albertalli, Matthew Quick, and Ned Vizzini about a nineteen-year-old girl who’s consumed by love, grief, and the many-tentacled beast of self-destructive behavior.

Freshman year at Harvard was the most anticlimactic year of Danny’s life. She’s failing pre-med and drifting apart from her best friend. One by one, Danny is losing all the underpinnings of her identity. When she finds herself attracted to an older, edgy girl who she met in rehab for an eating disorder, she finally feels like she might be finding a new sense of self. But when tragedy strikes, her self-destructive tendencies come back to haunt her as she struggles to discover who that self really is. With a starkly memorable voice that’s at turns hilarious and heartbreaking, Love and Other Carnivorous Plants brilliantly captures the painful turning point between an adolescence that’s slipping away and the overwhelming uncertainty of the future.

 

 

out of theOut of the Blue by Sophie Cameron (ISBN-13: 9781250149916 Publisher: Roaring Brook Press Publication date: 05/15/2018)

When otherworldly beings start falling from the sky, it seems like the end of days are near—but for one girl, it’s just the beginning of an adventure that will change her life.

Jaya’s life has completely fallen apart. Her mother is dead, her dad is on an obsessive wild goose chase, and mysterious winged beings are falling from the sky. For the past nine months, none of the them have survived the plummet to Earth, but when a female being lands near Jaya—and is still alive—she doesn’t call the authorities. She hides the being and tries to nurse her back to health.

Set against the backdrop of a society trying to come to grips with the possibility of a world beyond, Out of the Blue is the story of how one unexpected turn of events can put you on a path toward healing.

 

 

nothing happenedNothing Happened by Molly Booth (ISBN-13: 9781484753026 Publisher: Disney Press Publication date: 05/15/2018)

IT’S MUCH ADO . . . ABOUT EVERYTHING.

This modern-day retelling of Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing takes place at the idyllic Camp Dogberry, where sisters Bee and Hana Leonato have lived their whole lives. Their parents own the place, and every summer they look forward to leading little campers in crafts, swimming in the lake, playing capture the flag and Sproutball, and of course, throwing legendary counselor parties.

This year, the camp drama isn’t just on the improv stage. Bee and longtime counselor Ben have a will-they-or-won’t-they romance that’s complicated by events that happened-or didn’t happen-last summer. Meanwhile, Hana is falling hard for the kind but insecure Claudia, putting them both in the crosshairs of resident troublemaker John, who spreads a vicious rumor that could tear them apart.

As the counselors juggle their camp responsibilities with simmering drama that comes to a head at the Fourth of July sparkler party, they’ll have to swallow their pride and find the courage to untangle the truth, whether it leads to heartbreak or happily ever after.

 

 

brightsiders1The Brightsiders by Jen Wilde (ISBN-13: 9781250189714 Publisher: Feiwel & Friends Publication date: 05/22/2018)

A teen rockstar has to navigate family, love, coming out, and life in the spotlight after being labeled the latest celebrity trainwreck in Jen Wilde’s quirky and utterly relatable novel.

As a rock star drummer in the hit band The Brightsiders, Emmy King’s life should be perfect. But there’s nothing the paparazzi love more than watching a celebrity crash and burn. When a night of partying lands Emmy in hospital, she’s branded the latest tabloid train wreck.

Luckily, Emmy has her friends and bandmates, including the super-swoonworthy Alfie, to help her pick up the pieces of her life. She knows hooking up with a band member is exactly the kind of trouble she should be avoiding, and yet Emmy and Alfie Just. Keep. Kissing.

Will the inevitable fallout turn her into a clickbait scandal (again)? Or will she find the strength to stand on her own?

Jen Wilde, author of Queens of Geek, which Seventeen called, “the geeky, queer book of our dreams” is back with a brand new cast of highly diverse and relatable characters for her fans to fall in love with.

 

 

anger isAnger Is a Gift by Mark Oshiro (ISBN-13: 9781250167026 Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates Publication date: 05/22/2018)

Moss Jeffries is many things—considerate student, devoted son, loyal friend and affectionate boyfriend, enthusiastic nerd.

But sometimes Moss still wishes he could be someone else—someone without panic attacks, someone whose father was still alive, someone who hadn’t become a rallying point for a community because of one horrible night.

And most of all, he wishes he didn’t feel so stuck.

Moss can’t even escape at school—he and his friends are subject to the lack of funds and crumbling infrastructure at West Oakland High, as well as constant intimidation by the resource officer stationed in their halls. That was even before the new regulations—it seems sometimes that the students are treated more like criminals.

Something will have to change—but who will listen to a group of teens?

When tensions hit a fever pitch and tragedy strikes again, Moss must face a difficult choice: give in to fear and hate or realize that anger can actually be a gift.

 

 

funeralI Felt a Funeral, in My Brain by Will Walton (ISBN-13: 9780545709569 Publisher: Scholastic, Inc. Publication date: 05/29/2018)

How do you deal with a hole in your life?

Do you grieve?

Do you drink?

Do you make out with your best friend?

Do you turn to poets and pop songs?

Do you question everything?

Do you lash out?

Do you turn the lashing inward?

If you’re Avery, you do all of these things. And you write it all down in an attempt to understand what’s happened — and is happening — to you.

I Felt a Funeral, In My Brain is an astonishing novel about navigating death and navigating life, at a time when the only map you have is the one you can draw for yourself.

 

 

rage to liveRage to Live by Shirley Anne Edwards (ISBN-13: 978-1-64080-210-0 Publisher: Harmony Ink Publication date: 05/29/2018)

Finding the Strength: Book One

Can a young woman reveal her traumatic past to the woman who wants her to release the bubbling rage inside… her rage to live?

Charlie is attempting to start over after a horrifying, life-altering event pushed her and her family to the breaking point. Living with relatives in a different state might be her chance at something normal, something better.

Charlie may be broken, but she’s a survivor. Even retaking her senior year of high school doesn’t seem so daunting with the support of her cousins, who attend the local university. She finds herself on the road to recovery as her panic attacks vanish, thanks to the vivacious Arielle Forest, president of a popular sorority on campus and daughter of the dean. Arielle is no stranger to attention, drawing Charlie in with her positive attitude. But their new, tenuous relationship comes with a price that scares Charlie. What if Arielle can’t accept how deep Charlie’s scars run? Or the past that catches up with her? Charlie’s anxiety flares, and the temptation to add a matching scar to her right wrist is strong.

Collection Development: Updating My GN and Manga Collection; or, that time I decided I wanted to face my arch nemesis and build a better collection for my patrons

collectingcomics

Hello all, Collecting Comics is Ally Watkins’ column, but I’m co-opting her column for a brief moment to share with you how I’m going about re-vamping my graphic novel and manga collection. It’s okay, Ally helped me periodically on this project. I could not have done it without her and the help of several other librarians and my friends on Twitter, who are way better at graphic novel collection development than I am. I went to the experts.

Some of you may be aware, but I am in the midst of a massive collection development project. I took over here 3 1/2 years ago and after getting the Teen MakerSpace organized, I took a deep dive into collection development. That deep dive has included a huge weed (twice now), a re-organization, a diversity audit, and now I am looking at what I have always called my arch-nemesis: graphic novels. Let me state right at the beginning, I do not hate graphic novels or manga. I know that they are valuable and popular formats, they just don’t personally work for me as a reader, which makes ordering them more challenging. And to be honest, I find them overwhelming, in large part because they are often long running series which keep me on my toes and take a lot of space and budget. The budget issue comes in because I feel like I’m always replacing lost or damaged copies. Graphic novel collection development does not come as easily to me as YA collection development does, and I know I’m not alone.

Graphic novels still make up about 8% of the book market, and some 11.3 million graphic novels were sold in 2017. Source

So, here I am taking this deep dive into graphic novels and manga. Let me share with you a quick outline of what I’ve been doing.

I began by running a shelf list and weeding report.

I then made a list of every series that we have and every superhero we have something on. I used the stats to help me determine if it earned shelf space. If something hasn’t circulated in the last year, it goes into the consider weeding pile. My shelf space for this collection is tight and you have to earn your space.

I used the statistical information to determine whether we should keep or weed the series. I was only able to weed about 100 titles as the circulation statistics indicated that this is a high circulating collection. I also want to make a note here that we are very aware that circulation statistics alone can’t be our only measure because we have a large number of manga and gn readers who come in, read books off the shelf, and then place them back on the shelf. We see it happen daily. We have tried to put a basket for readers and asked that our patrons don’t re-shelve these items to help us get a better idea of what people are reading. I highly recommend not relying on circulation statistics alone for a manga/graphic novel collection because of in-house readers.

I went through and filled holes on massively popular series that we get a lot of I.L.L. requests for. This was a time consuming process that involved my shelf list which let me know which items were missing or lost.

Source: https://publishingperspectives.com/2018/01/childrens-books-salon-international-issues-trends-rights/

Source: https://publishingperspectives.com/2018/01/childrens-books-salon-international-issues-trends-rights/

We then made the decision to re-catalog all of our YA and Adult graphic novels simply as Graphic Novels (for us, GN means graphic novels and manga). This allowed us to put all of our adult and YA GNs into one location. Because we combined them both, we no longer wanted to promote them as YA or house them in YA. So they are no longer YA, but they are YA adjacent. We did this because we had a handful of graphic novels stuck in the 741.5 section, like The Walking Dead, that we knew our teens were reading but were getting lost in adult nonfiction. We wanted to adopt a more book store model and put all of our items of the same format into one location, but we also wanted to make sure that we weren’t saying the titles were necessarily YA. We do still have a separate E and J graphic novel section on our children’s floor.

I then turned to my librarian friends who excel at graphic novel collection development, including TLT’s own Ally Watkins, and several people I know from Twitter. I even tweeted pics of the series we do have and asked for recommendations. I compiled these recommendations and did some research.

I of course did the research and looked at things like award winners and YALSA best graphic novels lists. If a series appeared on a list, it got higher priority when considering whether or not to add it.

I then grabbed a notepad and pen and went a spent a day at Barnes and Noble. This was the most illuminating part of my research. You see, my library has two ranges of graphic novels and manga. Barnes and Noble has sixteen. That’s right, they have fourteen more shelving ranges of graphic novels and manga than the library has. I spoke at length to the staff at B&N and learned that graphic novels and manga are high selling items and a growing market. I knew from our stats that graphic novels were circulating well for us, but I had no idea how big of a market they are. Barnes and Noble has as much graphic novels and manga as they have Young Adult literature. I was blown away by this. Also, going through the graphic novels and manga at Barnes and Noble allowed me to look at a few titles from each recommended series, thumb through them, look at the rating on the back, etc. I felt it allowed me to make a somewhat more informed decision.

“According to NPD Bookscan data from global information provider the NPD Group, the comics and graphic novels category in the U.S. trade book market has experienced compound annual unit sales growth of 15 percent over the last three years, making it one of the highest growth categories in the trade book marketplace.” Source

I then placed an order to help add some new series to my graphic novel collection. I ordered a couple of titles in each series. I will then look in a couple of months to see how they are circulating and determine whether or not we want to add more of that series.

Today I am sharing with you a shelf list of the series that we either own or were recommended to me. Please note, it does not contain stand alone titles or titles by authors such as Raina Telgemeier or Gene Luan Yang, this is simply a look at some manga series that are recommended and some superheroes that you might want to make sure you have. These are not titles necessarily recommended by me, but have been recommended to me or their circulation at our library meant they were worth keeping in our collection. I am sure there are many series that we are missing, in fact, please feel free to comment and let me know what else you recommend.

Series Title (GNs and Manga, not superheroes)
Adventure Time
Ajin
Amulet
Assassination Classroom
Attack on Titan
Bakuman
Behind the Scenes
Black Butler
Bleach
Blue ExorcistBone
Chilling Adventures of Sabrina
Cleopatra in Space
Death Note
Doctor Who
Fairy Tale
Faith
The Far Side
Fruits Basket
Gabriel Dropout
Garfield
Giant Days
The Good Neighbors
Gotham Academy
Haven’t You Heard
I Hate Fairyland
I Kill Giants
Immortal Hounds
iZombie
Kill Shakespeare
The Last Airbender
Lumberjanes
The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzaumiya
Miki Falls
Monster Hunter
Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur
Naruto
One Piece
One Punch Man
Ouran High School Host Club
Pandora Hearts
Princeless
Riverdale (Archie)
Pretty Guardian (Sailor Moon)
The Sandman
School-live!
Scott Pilgrim vs. The World
Secret Coders
A Silent Voice
Simpsons
Spill Zone
Star Wars
Tokyo Ghoul
Transformers
Twin Star Exorcists
The Unbeatable Squirrell Girl
The Walking Dead
Zits
Superhero GNs
Ant-Man
Avengers
Batgirl
Batman
Black Panther
Captain Marvel
Daredeveil
Deadpool
Doctor Strange
Guardians of the Galaxy
Justice League
Ms. Marvel
Runaways
Spider-Man
Supergirl
Watchmen
Wonder Woman
X-Men

Putting the Science Back in Library Science: Collection Development, Diversity Audits, & Understanding Teens – Analyzing Data for Decision Making

I began working at The Public Library of Mount Vernon and Knox County in Ohio in January of 2015, for the second time. This was actually the public library I got my start in and I, along with a peer named Holly, were the first people ever hired to do teen services at this library. We started the collection from scratch as paraprofessionals and it has been interesting to return and work with this collection once again, a little over 20 years later.

As an experienced and now professional librarian, I work with collections much differently than I did when I began in the early 1990s. For one, there is now far more YA literature than there was in the beginning. Also, my understanding of adolescent development, collection development, and the role of libraries has changed dramatically. I have a greater sense of purpose that comes with having more experience and a stronger foundational knowledge. The collections I build today are more purposeful, and less personal, than they were in the beginning.

So after spending the first year getting re-acclimated to my home library, I dived deep into some real data analysis. I like working with data, facts and figures, to help me better understand who I’m serving, what they’re reading, and how I can best meet their needs. Below I will outline the lengthy process I went through to put together some good data and a plan of recommendations that I drew from analyzing that data.

Step 1: Understanding Teens as a Whole

Serving Full TILT Infographic

As part of our Serving Full T.I.L.T. series a few years back, several fellow YA librarians and myself went through and put together a good, foundational statistical report of what we knew about teens today in the United States. This helps us understand what teenage life is like in the United States.

Step 2: Local Community Demographics

communityprofile3 communityprofile2 communityprofile1

I then went through the process of putting together an extensive local community demographics profile. I searched high and low for every piece of data I could find about our community, including census data, poverty rates, high school graduation rates, etc. I didn’t just focus on teens at this point, though it does have a lot of data about teens which I eventually extracted out for my final report. These two steps gave me a solid portrait of what the national picture of teens looks like as well as at my local level. I won’t go into the process in depth here because I wrote a post about this step here: Doing a YA Collection Diversity Audit: Understanding Your Local Community (Part 1)

Step 3: Diversity Audit

diversityaudt1

I then spent a solid month really look at my library collection, focusing on YA fiction and GNs/Manga, to get a look at how diverse my collection was – or wasn’t – to help guide selections and acquisitions. My goal was to build a more diverse collection to help my teens live in a more diverse world. I wanted them to see both themselves reflected and to step into the shoes of lives different than their own to help increase their knowledge, understanding, and compassion of the world they are living in. Again, I have previously blogged about this process and you can read those posts here:

Doing a YA Collection Diversity Audit: The How To (Part 2)

Step 4: Circulation and Collection Analysis

collectionanaylsis

I then worked with reports to do a lot of weeding, a lot of purchasing, and a lot of data analysis. I looked at what percentage of the collection each part of my YA collections made up and compared it to the overall library holdings. I compared circulation statistics in the same way. For example, I could determine that my YA Fiction holdings were approximately 2% of the entire library holdings and then look to see what percentage of the overall circulation YA Fic items made up. You want the percentage to be the same or more than the holdings. So if YA Fic is 2% of the overall holdings, you want the circulation to be 2% or more of the overall circulation.

If the percentage of holdings is less than the percentage of circulation, you then have to work to find out why. For example, we have a small physical YA Audio collection that is an even smaller percentage of our overall circulation. The most probable reason why is that most teens no longer have CD players to play books on CD on. But the statistics make it clear that these items are not circulating well for us and we should devote less money and shelf space to these items.

In comparison, we have a fairly small collection of GNs and Manga, but the percentage of their circulation is higher. This means that one way we could increase our circulation may be to increase the size and holding of our GN and manga collection.

The data I collected included:

  • Total number of items held in the library collection
  • Total number of item per each collection that I purchased for, including YA fiction, graphic novels and manga, YA audio, and YA nonfiction
  • Total number of circulations for the entire library collection
  • Total number of circulations per each collection that I purchased for, including YA fiction, graphic novels and manga, YA audio, and YA nonfiction
  • Total percentage of holding for each collection that I purchase for
  • Total percentage of overall circulation for each collection that I purchase for
  • Percentage of collection that hasn’t circulated in the last calendar year
  • Number of items added to each collection in the last calendar year
  • Total amount spent on purchasing new items for the collection in the last calendar year
  • Average cost per item spent in the last calendar year
  • Total number of items weeded in each collection in the last calendar year

Some of the data I wanted to analyze I did not have good access to. For example, we subscribe to Hoopla and they do not break out YA items from children/youth items. We have contacted Hoopla and hope that they will work to provide some better data for us in the future.

We do not catalog or shelve our YA titles by genre, but if you do this type of analysis can also help guide future purchasing as you develop a better idea of what types of books your teens are reading. I can do this to some extent just by weeding because I have a long track record in YA, read it a lot, and have just worked a lot with YA fiction. Someone new to YA would have a harder time, though it would definitely help them learn more about their new collection.

Step 5: Findings and Recommendations

I took all of this data and put it into a visual report, an infographic, and then submitted a number of findings and recommendations. For example, I suggested that we stop purchasing YA on CDs and allow the collection to self-weed and put a greater emphasis on our digital YA audio collections. I recommended a variety of other things as well, such as moving the physical location of a couple of collections, increasing the size of a couple of collections, and looking into keeping track of in-house item use for materials such as GNs, manga and nonfiction because a lot of our patrons tend to read them in-house, put them on a shelving cart, and never really check them out. I have observed teens sitting in the YA area and reading entire stacks of GNs and manga that never get checked out and we are missing not only circulation stats, but useful collection development numbers to help guide series retention.

I did all of this background work while doing the daily business of managing staff, maintaining a Teen MakerSpace, working the Reference desk on occasion, etc. So yes, it took a few months to almost a year, but the information I have gained has been invaluable. I now have a much deeper understanding of my local community and a more comprehensive knowledge of my collection. I feel like I am making more informed decisions all around in serving my teens and building our collections. I enjoyed both the process and the outcome. I highly recommend it.

World Languages Collection Development Resources for Teen Librarians by Michelle Biwer

thingsineverlearnedinlibraryschool

A recent project at work led me to research how to find quality, recent books in world languages for children and young adults. The best resources I found that include books for teens are below. If you have any further suggestions please leave a comment, I would love to hear about it!

Vendors:

overdrive

Overdrive: provides e-books in Spanish for adults, teens, and children

tsaifongbooks

Tsai Fong Books:

  • Titles in Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese
  • Translated, authentic, and bilingual titles
  • English annotations for all titles
  • Company will help you build “starter collection” of essential titles
  • Includes literature awards in catalog
  • Adult, YA, and Children’s titles

Publishers:

Lectorum – publisher and distributor of books in Spanish, both books originally written in Spanish and translations.  Features Adult, YA, and children’s books.

Penguin Random House – publishes Spanish translations of children’s and YA books, including recent bestsellers.

toonbooks toonbooks2

Toon Books – graphic novel publisher with children’s and YA Spanish translations

Resources and Awards:

International Board on Books for Young People:

  • Awards
    • Hans Christian Anderson Award: recognizes lifelong achievement of children’s authors/illustrators from around the world
    • IBBY Honor List: election of outstanding, recently published books, honoring writers, illustrators and translators from IBBY member countries (2018 list)
    • IBBY Europe: best books for children in languages common in Europe
  • Bookbird – journal of international children’s literature featuring coverage of children’s literature studies and children’s literature awards around the world

Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award – rewards lifetime achievements for children’s authors, illustrators and oral storytellers internationally

Educational Book and Media Association – organization that caters to the educational media marketplace

Global Literature in Libraries Initiative – organization that promotes world literature

Worlds of Words – academic library at University of Arizona that specializes in global literature for children and young adults.

Collecting Comics: December 2017 Edition, by Ally Watkins

collectingcomics

Welcome to the December 2017 edition of Collecting Comics! Here are a few suggestions of things coming out this month that your teens and tweens will enjoy!

comicsdec1

Gotham Academy, Second Semester, Volume 2: The Ballad of Olive Silverlock by Brendan Fletcher, Becky Cloonan, and Karl Kerschl, illustrated by Adam Archer (DC Comics, December 5). In this final volume of the popular Gotham Academy series, we learn the fate of Olive, who has been possessed by her ancestor, Amity Arkham, who wants nothing more than to destroy Gotham City. Will the rest of the Detective Club be able to save her? Collects issues #9-#12 and #4 of the comic book series. This one features a lot of Gotham references, so give it to your Batman fans.

I Am Groot by Chris Hastings, illustrated by Flaviano (Marvel, December 5). When the Guardians of the Galaxy get stuck in a wormhole, a small Groot finds himself on his own in an alien world where no one can understand him. He must make a journey to the center of the world if he wants to find his family again! Collects issues #1-#5 of the comic book series.

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Star Wars: Rogue One Graphic Novel Adaptation by Allesandro Ferrari (IDW Publishing, December 12). This graphic adaptation of the popular Rogue One film features Jyn Erso, daughter of the Death Star’s creator, who is trying to save her father from Imperial control and steal the plans for the Death Star. Leads directly into the opening scene of Episode IV. All of your young Star Wars fans will be lining up for this one.

Lumberjanes Volume 7: A Bird’s-Eye View by Shannon Waters and Kat Leyh, illustrated by Carey Pietsch, Ayme Sotuyo, and Maarta Laiho (BOOM! Box, December 12). The High Council is coming to camp for inspection and everyone is trying to make everything perfect, even though there’s a storm brewing and kittens from the boy’s camp are manifesting magic powers. The multiple Eisner-award winning series is back with a new trade volume! Collects issues #25-#28 of the comic book series. Lumberjanes is perfect for fans of summer camp adventures and friendship stories.

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Brave Chef Brianna by Sam Sykes, illustrated by Selina Espiritu (BOOM! Studios, December 12). Brianna has big cooking dreams. She wants to open her own restaurant. But the only place she can afford to do it is in Monster City…where she’s the only human. Will her restaurant succeed?? Collects the entire limited series.

Misfit City Volume 1 by Kirsten “Kiwi” Smith and Kurt Lustgarten, illustrated by Naomi Franquiz (BOOM! Box, December 19).  Nothing fun has happened in Wilder’s hometown since they filmed a cult classic movie there in the 80s. But then she and her friends happen upon a centuries-old pirate map…and they discover their town might not be so boring after all! Collects issues #1-#4 of the comic book series. Give this one to your adventure readers.

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Ms. Marvel Volume 8: Mecca by G. Willow Wilson, illustrated by Adrian Alphona (Marvel, December 26). An old enemy resurfaces and begins to target those closest to intrepid teenage hero Kamala Khan. She begins to suspect that something even more sinister is at work. Collects issues #19-#24 of the comic book series. Your superhero fans will love Ms. Marvel, the Pakistani-American teen trying to balance family, friends, and superhero-ing in her hometown of Jersey City.

See you in 2018!

Doing a YA Collection Diversity Audit: Resources and Sources (Part 3)

In this final post on doing my diversity audit, I just wanted to share my sources and resources with you. It’s also available in the PDF outline of my process, but since these are clickable links you may prefer to access them this way. Also, if you know of additional book lists or titles that you would like to recommend, please add them in the comments.

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Diversity in Publishing

Statistics | Diversity in YA

The Diversity Baseline Survey | Lee & Low Books

Infographic Series: The Diversity Gap | Lee & Low Books

SLJ Resources for Diversity in Kid and YA Lit | School Library Journal

We Need Diverse Books | Official site of the #WeNeedDiverseBooks

Children’s Book Council (CBC) Diversity ;CBC Diversity Initiative | Children’s Book Council

Cooperative Children’s Book Center: Publishing Stats on Children’s Books and Diversity

Population Statistics

U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts selected: UNITED STATES

LGBT America: By the Numbers | Washington Week – PBS

Doing a Diversity Audit

Diversity in Collection Development – American Library Association

Having Students Analyze Our Classroom Library To See How Diverse It Is

Diversity in Libraries–From Collections and Community to Staff

Third Graders Assess and Improve Diversity of Classroom Library

How You Can Support the #WeNeedDiverseBooks Campaign

Additional Resources: Book Lists and New Releases

Diversity in YA (General)

We Need Diverse Books | Official site of the #WeNeedDiverseBooks

Reading While White

Rich In Color

Book Lists | Diversity in YAwww.diversityinya.com/category/book-lists/

Diversity in Young Adult and Middle Grade (1351 books) – Goodreads

31 Young Adult Books With Diverse Characters Literally Everyone

Diversity YA Life: Diverse Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror – The Hub

Diversity YA Life: Urban Fiction – The Hub

Rich in Color | Reading & Reviewing Diverse YA Booksrichincolor.com/

Diversify YA Life: Horror with Diverse Characters

50 Years of Diversity in Young Adult Literature by Edith Campbell

60 Diverse Books To Look for in 2017

10 Diverse Books by YA Authors of Color to Read in 2017 | Teen Vogue

Faces of Color on 2017 YA Books – Book Riot

Asian American Protagonists

Best Asian-American Teen Fiction (156 books) – Goodreads

A Round-Up of Awesome Asian American Protagonists in YA Lit

11 Young Adult Novels By Asian-American Authors – Bustle

LatinX Representation

Latinx Ya Shelf – Goodreads

13 Upcoming YA Books By Latinx Authors To Start Getting Excited

9 Books By Latinx Authors I Wish I Had As A Teenager – Bustle

Latinxs in Kid Lithttps://latinosinkidlit.com/ 

Native American Representation

American Indians in Children’s Literature

#OwnVoices Representation: Native American Authors – YA Interrobang

Teen Books With Native American Characters and Stories (66 books)

Some thoughts on YA lit and American Indians – American Indians in Children’s Literature/Debbie Reese

Books Outside The Box: Native Americans – The Hub

Teen Books by Native Writers to Trumpet Year-Round | School Library

POC Leads

10 Diverse Books by YA Authors of Color to Read in 2017 | Teen Vogue

Faces of Color on 2017 YA Books – Book Riot

12 Young Adult Novels With POC Protagonists – Bustle

14 YA Books About LGBTQ People of Color – The B&N Teen Blog

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LGBTQAI+

YA Pride (formerly Gay YA) : YA Pride (@YA_Pride) | Twitter

30 Essential LGBT Books for YA Readers – AbeBooks

100 Must-Read LGBTQIA YA Books – Book Riot

23 of Our Most Anticipated LGBTQA YA Books of 2017 – The B&N

72 Must-Read YA Books Featuring Gay Protagonists – Epic Reads

The Rainbow Book List

Stonewall Book Awards List

Disability in YA Lit

Disability in Kidlit — Reviews, articles, and more about the portrayal of …

People First: Disabilities in YA Lit – The Hub

Feminist YA

50 Crucial Feminist YA Novels – The B&N Teen Blog

34 Young Adult Books Every Feminist Will Love – BuzzFeed

100 Young Adult Books for the Feminist Reader | Bitch Media

Body Acceptance

5 Body-Positive YA Reads to Take to the Beach – The B&N Teen Blog

Celebrating Every Body: 25 Body Image Positive Books for Mighty Girls

7 Body Positive YA Books That Slay | Brit + Co

Julie Murphy’s ‘Dumplin’ And 6 Other Body Positive YA Novels – Bustle

Religious Diversity in YA

#FSYALit at Teen Librarian Toolbox

Rich in Color | Six YA Books with Middle Eastern or Muslim Protagonists

Diversity in YA Literature: Muslim Teens – The Hub

Jewish Themed Young Adult Books, Not About The Holocaust

The Big Five (+1) in YA: Atheism and Agnosticism – The Hub

The Big Five (+1) in YA: Buddhism – The Hub

Mental Health in YA

#MHYALit at Teen Librarian Toolbox

29 YA Books About Mental Health That Actually Nail It – BuzzFeed

16 YAs That Get it Right: Mental Health Edition – The B&N Teen Blog

YA novels that get real about mental health – HelloGiggles

11 YA Novels That Deal With Mental Health Issues – Bustle

10 Must-Read YA Books That Also Talk About Mental Health – Healthline

Socio-Economic Diversity in YA Lit

Socio-Economic Diversity in YA Lit

Poverty in YA Literature

Rich Teen, Poor Teen: Books that depict teens living in poverty

#SJYALit: A Bibliography of MG and YA Lit Featuring Homeless Youth

Own Voices

MG/YA/NA #ownvoices (216 books) – Goodreads

#OwnVoices in Disability and Neurodiversity | The Daily Dahlia

11 of Our Most Anticipated #OwnVoices Reads of 2017

10 Amazing #OwnVoices Reads from 2016

LGBTQA Science Fiction and Fantasy YA by #OwnVoices Authors

Don’t forget to check out the hasthag #OwnVoices on Twitter

New Releases

YA Books Centralwww.yabookscentral.com/

Teen Reads – www.teenreads.com

Book Riot – www.bookriot.com

Barnes and Noble Teen Blog – www.barnesandnoble.com/blog/teen/

YA Interrobang – www.yainterrobang.com

YA Lit – www.yalit.com

Epic Reads – www.epicreads.com

Pop Crush – www.popcrush.com

Bustle – www.bustle.com

Adventures in YA – www.adventuresinya.com

Coming Soon

17 Upcoming YA by Authors of Color: Bustle

Teens of Color on 2018 YA Book Covers – STACKED – books

2018 YA/MG Books With POC Leads (120 books) – Goodreads

Thirteen YA Books That Feature POC Leads Coming to You This 2018

17 YA Books By Authors Of Color To Look Out For In The First Half Of 2018

2018 YA Books with (Possible) LGBT Themes (114 books) – Goodreads – please note the possible noted here

The Complete List of 2018 YA Releases | Fictionist Magazine

YA Novels of 2018 (708 books) – Goodreads

YA Debuts 2018 (96 books) – Goodreads

Electric Eighteens | Electric 18s – 2018 Debut Young Adult

*with assistance from TLTer Heather Booth

Complete YA Collection Diversity Audit Series

Doing a YA Collection Diversity Audit: Understanding Your Local Community (Part 1)

Doing a YA Collection Diversity Audit: The How To (Part 2)

Doing a YA Collection Diversity Audit: Resources and Sources (Part 3)

Diversity Audit Outline 2017 with Sources

Doing a YA Collection Diversity Audit: The How To (Part 2)

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So yesterday I began telling you about doing my diversity audit. I began in a place that many people wouldn’t suspect, by doing a local community needs and assessment evaluation. I thought if I wanted to understand why I was building a diverse/inclusive collection, I also wanted to understand who I was doing it for. Also, this was part of my process on researching target goals. The question I asked myself is this: what does an inclusive YA collection look like? And to do that I thought I needed to better understand what my local community and the world at large actually looks like. No guessing, no anecdotes, but facts.

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After looking at my local community demographics, I then researched what the U.S. population looks like, keeping in mind that U.S. Census data comes out every ten years and involves a lot of margin for error because respondents must use per-detetermined categories to respond and many people identify in more than one way. (Note: please see uploaded outline below for a more complete look at stats and diversity categories to investigate.)

2010 census data

Serving Teens in Libraries Infographic

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Then I dived deep into what diversity in children’s publishing looks like (spoiler alert: it’s not good). I used resources like the Lee and Low Diversity Baseline Survey to get a better understanding of what diversity in children’s publishing looks like. A realistic diversity goal has to include an understanding of what is being published. We can’t buy diverse titles that don’t exist, which is why we must continue to ask the publishing world to work towards better inclusion at all levels of publishing.

Childrens Books Infographic 18 24 V3

“This year, the number jumped to 28% . . . ” – http://blog.leeandlow.com/2017/03/30/the-diversity-gap-in-childrens-book-publishing-2017/

Checklist: 8 Steps to Creating a Diverse Book Collection | Lee & Low

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Another worksheet example can be found here: http://sfpsmom.com/black-history-month-12-diversify-bookshelves/

With a better understanding of what the world looks like and some real investigation into my own personal biases and privilege (which is an ongoing process), I then began looking at my collection in depth. This was a painstaking process that involved a lot of research. I researched each title and author in my collection to the extent that was reasonably possible. Reasonably meaning given an appropriate use of my time, skills, and what information is available. For example, not all authors are publicly out and they deserve to make that decision for themselves, but it can affect a count of Own Voices GLBTQAI+ titles. Please note: you can make your headings and count whatever it is you wish to audit.

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My excel worksheet, created by importing a shelf list, looks like this

At one point my fellow TLTer Robin Willis came out for a week long visit and we went title by title through my shelf list discussing whether or not a title had a main or supporting character that was something other than white, male, cisgender. We had a lot of quality discussions about individual titles, authors and the idea of diversity and inclusion as a whole. And yes, public librarians do indeed end up taking weird vacations, so thank you Robin for taking your time to come spend with me and help me with this project.

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After doing the inventory several times and determining that I had the best knowledge that I could have, I then went and did the math that told me which percentage of my collection was diverse, Own Voices, GLBTQAI+ or featured a teen with a disability. I assumed I was doing a good job of building diverse, inclusive collections. It “felt” like I was doing a good job. I was trying to do a good job. Spoiler alert: I was not. Even when I was being intentional in building inclusive collections, I was not doing as well as I thought I was. For example, the percentage of titles featuring a teen with a disability were dismal at only 2.2%. However, after some targeted ordering, my GLBTQAI+ percentage went from around 3% up to 6.5%. This is part of why this type of collection audit is informative: I thought I was doing a good job of buying diverse titles, but an audit revealed that I wasn’t doing as good of a job as I thought I was and helped me make more informed and purposeful purchasing decisions. I thought I was doing a good job, I learned that I wasn’t, now I am doing better and have the data to back that statement up.

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As a tangential note, I will also admit that this in depth collection analysis has also led me on a quest to investigate subject headings in our catalog. For example, we had books with the heading of transvestite, transsexual and transgender, and since transgender is the term that teen readers will be most familiar with and is the currently preferred term, we added a subject heading of transgender (transgender people – fiction) to all titles. Similarly, we looked at titles like Tash Hearts Tolstoy to make sure that teens looking for asexual representation could find that title using our card catalog without having to ask an adult. Teens looking for GLBTQAI+ materials in particular don’t always want or feel comfortable asking an adult for help so we are working on making these titles accessible in multiple ways for teens who want to read but don’t necessarily want to ask for help in locating titles.

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This work is ongoing for me. As I mentioned above, it helps inform my monthly book ordering. Now when I do a book order, I do a sort of mini audit of each book order to make sure that I am doing the work of building an inclusive collection each and every order. I will also do occasional targeted audits, like this summer when I went through each and every letter of the GLBTQAI+ umbrella and made sure I had quality titles that represented each letter. A yearly or every few years audit combined with monthly book order audits and targeted audits makes my collection development more intentional. It’s not enough to think I’m doing the work, I now do the work. And having concrete facts and figures in front of me helps me to stop assuming while confronting my purchasing biases head on. And since I just took over this collection 3 years ago (new library), it has helped me better know and understand this collection as well as what is offered, making for some amazing RA to be honest. It also helped me fill in title holes and re-order missing or lost books that I think every collection should have.

The benefits of doing a diversity collection audit are plentiful and I highly recommend it, with a few caveats. First, it’s important that we remember that not all representation is good representation. There are a lot of tropes, stereotypes, and controversial titles out there that you should be aware of. You’ll also want to take the time to make yourself more familiar with Own Voices authors and titles. Remember that even when we talk about diversity, we should have diverse titles within that diverse representation. For example, not all GLBTQAI+ titles should be coming out stories, and not all coming out stories are the same. And, finally, we should remember and value the importance of intersectionality: most people identify as more than one thing, and that should be represented in our literature as well. For example, a black woman may identify as having a disability and being bisexual, because we are all complex human beings who are more than one thing and all more than our labels. Those stories deserve to be told and read.

With all that said, here is an in depth outline of this project: Diversity Audit Outline 2017 with Sources

Complete YA Collection Diversity Audit Series

Doing a YA Collection Diversity Audit: Understanding Your Local Community (Part 1)

Doing a YA Collection Diversity Audit: The How To (Part 2)

Doing a YA Collection Diversity Audit: Resources and Sources (Part 3)

Edited to Add: Someone asked about measuring intersectionality. You could simply add a column heading for intersectionality and any book that has more than one tally mark in a column would also have a tally mark for intersectionality. Then you would do the math and have an idea of how many intersectional titles are in your collection.

Also, after you do your original collection audit, you can then just do an audit of all the titles added since the date of your last audit and combine the information. If you do book order audits, that information could also be added to your original audit to keep your figures current.

In Our Mailbox: How Do You Keep Track of New Releases?

Occasionally we get email from readers, which we try to answer. One question we’ve gotten asked a lot is about how we keep track of upcoming MG and YA releases. So today we thought we would share with you each of our personal methods. Share yours with us in the comments please.

How Karen Keeps Track of Upcoming & New Releases

I have learned over the years that I am a visual person, so I have made for myself a notebook which is my life blood for both reviewing for the blog and collection development for my library.

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The notebook is divided into months and at the beginning of each month I print out a calendar where I write in release dates for review purposes and schedule posts.

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Then within each month I print off a variety of lists of titles that come out that month. I use sources like Edelweiss and Baker and Taylor 360 to build my lists of upcoming titles. For example, I will put titles into carts based on their release dates. Then in February I can go in and submit the March and April carts for purchase (we can’t have titles more than 3 months out in our ordering carts). Having a visual print out of my carts also helps me do a double check for diversity. I look at each title to see what topics it covers, who the authors are, etc. If I find I am ordering too many of one type of book, I look to see what midlist titles I can drop off and replace with different types of titles. And yes, I take covers into consideration as well because teens do judge a book by its cover. I have the amount of money and how many titles I can purchase by month down to an exact science, which also helps.

For specific tools, I like to use Edelweiss, Netgalley and B&T. Edelweiss, for example, allows you to move titles into a “Collection” and give it a name. I name mine by publisher and release date. I then print them off and place them into my notebook. Then when it’s time to order I can move those collections into an ordering cart to be submitted.

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I use Edelweiss and B&T because they allow me to sort and print lists in ways that are meaningful to me. They also allow me to include things like synopsis, subject headings and age ranges. I then also visit other blogs to make sure I’m not somehow missing either big name titles or something that maybe sounds awesome but just isn’t getting the big buzz. No matter how hard we all try, however, things do occasionally get missed because we’re all human.

You can also get a good visual list to begin with by Googling “April New YA Goodreads” (as an example), particularly during the first three months of a new year. For some reason, these lists tend to taper off as the year progresses. This is by no means a great collection development tool, but it can be a great resource for new series titles that are coming out in the beginning of the year.

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And yes, I recycle. 😀


How Robin Keeps Track of Upcoming & New Releases


I usually select new titles after reading reviews in periodicals such as School Library Journal, VOYA, or Booklist. Once I’ve decided a title might be something to add to our collection, I go online to the vendors I normally use for purchasing and add it to one of the lists I’ve created to track items for purchase. I’ve divided the lists into fiction, graphic novels, social sciences, science and technology, humanities, and history and biography.


How Amanda Keeps Track of Upcoming & New Releases


I keep a few different lists to stay on top of what’s new. One is specifically new and forthcoming LGBTQIA+ YA books. One is galleys I’ve gotten and intend to read. Another document includes ALL of the review books I get–whether I requested them or not, whether I intend to review them or not. My last document is books on my radar that I need to track down. I check in with Edelweiss weekly to add new titles to all those lists. I am lucky that I get a lot of catalogs from publishers asking me to pick what I’d like them to send me. I read SLJ, VOYA, and The Horn Book and build lists from titles that catch my attention there. I owe a lot of credit to Twitter–all of the book chatter there about new and upcoming titles means I’m adding titles to all of my lists almost daily.


To manage my TBR mountain, I try to mostly read in order of publication date. I plan out what I intend to review for TLT as books roll in, then fit in other books around those titles. I rarely read out of order–publication dates keep me on a schedule and help the pile not feel so staggering. I’ve had to learn to DNF books, something I’ve never been good at, because there are only so many books I can ever read, so why waste my time on ones that don’t work for me. I’ve made myself stop hate-reading things. I tend to not write negative reviews and will just skip books that aren’t appealing. Some days my mountain feels manageable. Then UPS shows up with more books. And all of my library holds come in at once. And Edelweiss adds new titles. And publishers’ catalogs appear in my inbox. I’m not complaining; it’s a pretty great problem to have.


How Heather Keeps Track of Upcoming & New Releases



I keep a running cart that I can add to. I check http://www.teenreads.com/coming-soon pretty regularly (I should do it every month, but don’t always remember) so I can preorder. That’s mainly for ordering purposes. For my own TBR list, I use Goodreads.

Evy’s First Impressions

What prompts a teen to pick up one book instead of another? Evy dug through Heather’s big old box-o-books and picked four to take home. What did she pick and why? This TLT Teen Advisory Board member is an avid YouTube fan, so she decided to tell you in a video. Thanks Evy!

Books discussed:

Gorgeous by Paul Rudnick

Love Drugged by James Klise

Under Shifting Glass by Nicky Singer

The Sister Pact by Stacie Rayme

Maker Bookshelf, the next step in our Maker journey at The Public Library of Mount Vernon and Knox County

A few weeks ago, I announced that we were organizing a Maker Collection of materials that we will circulate at The Public Library of Mount Vernon and Knox County. It is one of three things we are doing to better incorporate the Maker movement into our library.

makerspaceThis is the process we went through to establish the collection.

1. Collection Codes and Definitions

Before we began, we had to figure out the technical aspects of starting a new collection. This meant discussing things like collection codes, spine labels, circulation periods, etc. We use Polaris and it was pretty easy for our Tech Services staff to put together the necessary collection codes for us. We decided to label them MS for MakerSpace and TS created special spine labels for them. This first step was actually the easiest part of the entire process.

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2. Evaluating the Current Collection

Next we began actually trying to build the collection. The first thing we did was to go through all the items we actually had on the shelves and decide if we wanted to keep them where they were or re-catalog them and move them to the MS collection. We discovered we had quite a few titles on hand that we felt could easily fit into this collection and we pulled them. As I type this TS in the process of re-cataloging them for us (thank you TS!)

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3. Researching New Items

The next part of the process involved research, but since we are librarians we’re actually pretty good at this. We began with the recent SLJ Maker Shelf list and went from there. Another great resource are the books published by Make which you can find at Make Zine. I then created a very extensive wishlist of books using Amazon. It ended up being rather large. I printed off a copy of the list for multiple people and then the head of Children’s and I sat down and went through the list title by title to evaluate them. One of the first things we looked at was, of course, publication date. Beyond that we wanted to make sure we had a variety of topics covered. The topics we are looking to include in our Maker collection include: Coding, Electronics, Robotics, Engineering, Digital Photography, Movie Making, Making, Tinkering, etc.

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4. Discussing Goals and Definitions, Again

We had a rather lengthy discussion about the crafting section and decided that due to it’s size, we would leave it for the time being where it was because the shelf space that we have for the Maker collection would not accommodate the number of titles we currently have in the J nonfiction collection that deal with arts and crafts. I personally am a big proponent of arts and crafts and feel like this is a valid part of the maker movement, but in the end we had to select some specific, targeted goals and boundaries because of the space we had available to us.

5. Building the New Collection

In the end, we ordered a pretty decent number of titles for this new collection (which I have conveniently shared with you below thanks in no small part to the kind generosity of TLTer Robin Willis – thank you Robin!).

Note: The list below includes items that we ordered for the Maker collection and items that we ordered to put into our Circulating Maker Kits (CMKs).

As you can tell, this is a work in progress. And if you ask me, it’s an exciting and very fulfilling work in progress. A lot of people have worked hard to try and make all this happen and it has been fun, informative, and very professionally fulfilling. I believe we are doing good things for our local community, and that basically rocks.

Maker Collection Booklist:

Stopmotion Explosion: Animate Anything and Make Movies- Epic Films for $20 or Less  by Nate Eckerson

Brick Flicks: A Comprehensive Guide to Making Your Own Stop-Motion LEGO Movies by Sarah Herman

The Kids’ Guide to Digital Photography: How to Shoot, Save, Play with & Print Your Digital Photos by Jenni Bidner

The Maker Movement Manifesto: Rules for Innovation in the New World of Crafters, Hackers, and Tinkerers by Hatch, Mark

Totally Awesome Rubber Band Jewelry: Make Bracelets, Rings, Belts & More with Rainbow Loom(R), Cra-Z-Loom(TM)​, or FunLoom(TM) by Colleen Dorsey

Robot Building for Teens by Behnam Salemi

Kids Inventing! A Handbook for Young Inventors by Susan Casey

Fundamentals of Robotics: Fun for parents and children (Robots For Children) (Volume 1) by Prof Charria

101 Mixed Media Techniques: Master the fundamental concepts of mixed media art by Cherril Doty, Suzette Rosenthal, Isaac Anderson

Drawing Comics Lab: 52 Exercises on Characters, Panels, Storytelling, Publishing & P​rofessional Practices (Lab Series) by Robyn Chapman

Creative Photography Lab: 52 Fun Exercises for Developing Self-Expressio​n with your Camera. Includes 6 Mixed-Media Projects (Lab Series) by Steve Sonheim, Carla Sonheim

Print & Stamp Lab: 52 Ideas for Handmade, Upcycled Print Tools (Lab Series) by Traci Bunkers

Collage Lab: Experiments, Investigations​, and Exploratory Projects (Lab Series) by Bee Shay

Art Lab for Little Kids: 52 Playful Projects for Preschoolers (Lab Series) by Susan Schwake, Rainer Schwake

Paint Lab: 52 Exercises inspired by Artists, Materials, Time, Place, and Method (Lab Series) by Deborah Forman

Drawing Lab for Mixed-Media Artists: 52 Creative Exercises to Make Drawing Fun (Lab Series) by Carla Sonheim

Art Lab for Kids: 52 Creative Adventures in Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Paper, and Mixed Media-For Budding Artists of All Ages (Lab Series) by Susan Schwake, Rainer Schwake

The Loomatic’s Interactive Guide to the Rainbow Loom by Suzanne M. Peterson

Loom Band It: 60 Rubberband Projects for the Budding Loomineer by Kat Roberts, Tessa Sillars-Powell

Brick City: Global Icons to Make from LEGO (Brick…LEGO Series) by Warren Elsmore

The Art of LEGO Design: Creative Ways to Build Amazing Models by Jordan Schwartz

Brick Vehicles: Amazing Air, Land, and Sea Machines to Build from LEGO® by Warren Elsmore

The LEGO Adventure Book, Vol. 2: Spaceships, Pirates, Dragons & More​! by Megan H. Rothrock

The Unofficial LEGO Builder’s Guide (Now in Color!) by Allan Bedford

The LEGO Adventure Book, Vol. 1: Cars, Castles, Dinosaurs & Mo​re! by Megan H. Rothrock

Make: The Makerspace Workbench: Tools, Technologies, and Techniques for Making by Adam Kemp

Zero to Maker: Learn (Just Enough) to Make (Just About) Anything by David Lang

Arduino for Beginners: Essential Skills Every Maker Needs by John Baichtal

The Best of Instructables Volume I: Do-It-Yourself Projects from the World’s Biggest Show & Tell (v. 1) by The editors at MAKE magazine and Instructables. com

Unscrewed: Salvage and Reuse Motors, Gears, Switches, and More from Your Old Electronics by Ed Sobey

Life Hacks: Any Procedure or Action That Solves a Problem, Simplifies a Task, Reduces Frustration, Etc. in One’s Everyday Life by Keith Bradford

The Big Book of Maker Skills (Popular Science): 200+ Tools & Techni​ques for Building Great Tech Projects by Chris Hackett

The Big Book of Maker Skills (Popular Science): Tools & Techni​ques for Building Great Tech Projects by Chris Hackett

The Big Book of Hacks: 264 Amazing DIY Tech Projects by Doug Cantor

62 Projects to Make with a Dead Computer: (And Other Discarded Electronics) by Randy Sarafan

Boomerangs: How to Make and Throw Them by Bernard S. Mason

The Paper Boomerang Book: Build Them, Throw Them, and Get Them to Return Every Time (Science in Motion) by Mark Latno

Papertoy Monsters: 50 Cool Papertoys You Can Make Yourself! by Brian Castleforte, Netta Rabin, Robert James

Making Things Move DIY Mechanisms for Inventors, Hobbyists, and Artists by Dustyn Roberts

Amazing Leonardo da Vinci Inventions: You Can Build Yourself (Build It Yourself) by Maxine Anderson

Karakuri: How to Make Mechanical Paper Models That Move by Keisuke Saka, Eri Hamaji

The Motorboat Book: Build & Launch 20 Jet Boats, Paddle-Wheeler​s, Electric Submarines & M​ore (Science in Motion) by Ed Sobey

The Art of Tinkering by Karen Wilkinson, Mike Petrich

LEGO Chain Reactions: Design and build amazing moving machines (Klutz S) by Pat Murphy and the Scientists of Klutz Labs

Kinetic Contraptions: Build a Hovercraft, Airboat, and More with a Hobby Motor by Curt Gabrielson

Make: More Electronics: Journey Deep Into the World of Logic Chips, Amplifiers, Sensors, and Randomicity by Charles Platt

Programming Arduino: Getting Started With Sketches by Monk Simon

Make: Getting Started with Adafruit FLORA: Making Wearables with an Arduino-Compat​ible Electronics Platform by Becky Stern, Tyler Cooper

Make: Wearable Electronics: Design, prototype, and wear your own interactive garments by Kate Hartman

JunkBots, Bugbots, and Bots on Wheels: Building Simple Robots With BEAM Technology by David Hrynkiw, Mark Tilden

Make an Arduino-Contro​lled Robot (Make: Projects) by Michael Margolis

Make a Raspberry Pi-Controlled Robot: Building a Rover with Python, Linux, Motors, and Sensors by Wolfram Donat

Robot Builder: The Beginner’s Guide to Building Robots by John Baichtal

Make: Basic Arduino Projects: 26 Experiments with Microcontrolle​rs and Electronics by Don Wilcher

The Best of Make: (Make 75 Projects from the pages of MAKE) by Mark Frauenfelder, Gareth Branwyn

Make: Electronics (Learning by Discovery) by Charles Platt

Make: Sensors: A Hands-On Primer for Monitoring the Real World with Arduino and Raspberry Pi by Tero Karvinen, Kimmo Karvinen, Ville Valtokari

Robot Builder’s Bonanza, 4th Edition by Gordon McComb

Make: The Maker’s Manual: A Practical Guide to the New Industrial Revolution by Paolo Aliverti, Andrea Maietta, Patrick Di Justo

Making Makers: Kids, Tools, and the Future of Innovation by AnnMarie Thomas

Make: Tinkering: Kids Learn by Making Stuff by Curt Gabrielson

Make: Getting Started with littleBits: Prototyping and Inventing with Modular Electronics by Ayah Bdeir, Matt Richardson

Making Simple Robots: Exploring Cutting-Edge Robotics with Everyday Stuff by Kathy Ceceri

Make: Getting Started with Sensors: Measure the World with Electronics, Arduino, and Raspberry Pi by Kimmo Karvinen, Tero Karvinen

Kodu for Kids: The Official Guide to Creating Your Own Video Games by James Floyd Kelly

Video Game Programming for Kids by Jonathan S. Harbour

Teach Your Kids to Code: A Parent-Friendl​y Guide to Python Programming by Bryson Payne

Super Scratch Programming Adventure! (Covers Version 2): Learn to Program by Making Cool Games by The LEAD Project

Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python, 2nd Edition by Al Sweigart

Java Programming for Kids: Learn Java Step By Step and Build Your Own Interactive Calculator for Fun! (Java for Beginners) by R. Chandler Thompson

Adventures in Minecraft by David Whale, Martin O’Hanlon

Python for Kids: A Playful Introduction to Programming by Jason R. Briggs

Learn to Program with Scratch: A Visual Introduction to Programming with Games, Art, Science, and Math by Majed Marji

Doc Fizzix Mousetrap Racers 14.20 9781565233591
Make 11.99 9781457186707
Rosie Revere Engineer 13.31 9781419708459
How to Make a Movie in 10 Easy Lessons 7.19 9781633220126
Python for Kids 20.97 9781593274078
Tricky Video 18.95 9781591746232
The Spinning Blackboard and Other Dynamic Experiments on Force and Motion 10.80 9780471115144
Tinkerlab 13.17 9781611800654
Squishy Circuits 8.53 9781631377952
Stomp Rockets Catapults and Kaleidoscopes 10.17 9781556527371
Video Game Programming for Kids 11.99 9781435461161
Cool Creations in 101 Pieces 11.77 9781627790178
Cool Creations in 35 Pieces 10.20 9780805096927
Cool Cars and Trucks 10.20 9780805087611
Totally Cool Creations 11.99 9781250031105
Filmmaking For Teens 11.37 9781932907049
The Paper Boomerang Book 7.77 9781569762820
Recycled Robots 19.59 9780761154662
The Racecar Book 8.97 9781613747148
The Flying Machine Book 8.97 9781613740866
The Robot Book 8.97 9781556524073
Javascript for Kids 20.97 9781593274085
HighTech DIY Projects With 3D Printing 11.16 9781477766767
Engineering the ABCs 11.35 9781933916514
Making a Circuit 4.79 9781432956790
Conductors and Insulators 20.41 9781432956738
Teach Your Kids to Code 17.97 9781593276140
Animation Studio 15.69 9780763667016
Amazing Rubber Band Cars 8.97 9781556527364
Python Basics 15.00 9781107658554
Hello World 23.99 9781617290923
3D Game Programming for Teens 33.24 9781598638431
Loom Magic Creatures 7.19 9781629147956
Loom Magic Charms 7.19 9781632202598
CSS for Babies 7.06 9780615555218
HTML for Babies 7.06 9780615487663
ABC of the Web 12.30 9780988472617
Web Design for Babies 20 7.84 9780988472600
Computer Coding 3.59 9781465426857

MakerSpace Notes:

My Original Mobile Makerspace
My Updated Mobile Makerspace
MakerSpace Tech Tools Comparison Chart
The Unboxing and Learning Curve
Exploring Circulating Maker Kits