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Why I DNFed MUNMUN by Jesse Andrews and Won’t Be Recommending It

Please Be Aware: SPOILERS abound in this discussion


Last summer I went to ALA and picked up an ARC for a book called MunMum by Jesse Andrews. After reading the back copy, this was the book I was most excited to read, but I wanted to wait closer to release date. This past weekend I spent a lot of time driving in the car and read it I did. Well, I started to, but I am DNFing this one. To be honest, it has been a long time since a book has made me this angry. Let me tell you why.

Please note: There will be intense spoilers for the first 100 pages of MunMun below.

So. Many. Spoilers.

In this world, everyone’s size is directly proportional to their economic worth. So the poorest of the poor are the size of rats and called littlepoor. And the richest of the rich are the size of skyscrapers and are called bigrich. There are a lot of sizes in between. There is a handy picture chart at the beginning to put it all in visual perspective for readers.

This story is told in the voice of Warner, a littlepoor and brother to Prayer. In the beginning, their milk crate house is smashed by a slightly larger and thus more well off person, and they find themselves having to live in a camp kind of like a tent city. And they are trying to find a way out of their financial predicament so they can scale up – having more money means they can get physically bigger which would make them safer. It’s a metaphor. The one thing I will give MunMun (which is what they call money in this world) is that it does really demonstrate in concrete terms how wealth is associated with power and safety. The littlepoor are literally in extreme danger constantly because they can be smashed with a single footstep by the bigrich.

But that is the only thing I am giving this book.

So what is their plan? Well, their plan is that the sister should go to law school. No, not to get an education and become a lawyer and get a good job to help bring in money, but to marry a middle rich who would have to share their munmun and scale up the family. That’s their plan: Prayer must woo and marry someone with more money.

So Warner and Prayer take an adventure to the city where a law school is. Prayer brings along U for protection, taking advantage of the love she knows he has for her in a very cold and calculated way. The first part of the novel she is truly awful to him in every way and manipulates his love and devotion to her for her own personal gain. Because of course she does, that’s what women do don’t you know. We are cold, calculating creatures that manipulate and harm people to advance our station in life. Warner, paragon of virtue and conscience, is constantly reprimanding Prayer for this and telling his friend to please stop allowing himself to be used in this way. Man I hate Warner and they way he talks about and to his sister.

When they get to the school her plan is to bat her eyelashes and just agree with everything the law students say, no matter how dumb it makes her sound. Because that’s how women woo. So the men all mock her because they know she’s being utterly stupid and no one can figure out why their plan isn’t working. Well, Warner of course knows why their plan isn’t working and sees the utter contempt that these men have for his stupid sister, because of course Warner does. Yep, I still hate Warner.

But Warner has a secret skill: he is a great dream weaver. So he goes in to the dreams of the law students and creates the most romantic dreamscape he can think of and they pretend that it is Prayer doing it to woo the law students. When she fails at wooing, her brother uses his amazing gift to help her out and takes the credit for it. Warner saves the day.

You can also dreambang, which is having psuedo-sex in the dreams. I’m not making that up, it’s called dreambanging in the book. She of course employs this as well, dream banging whoever is willing in hopes that she will find a spouse and her family can scale up. So she’s a dreambanging prostitute.

And after a while, I just couldn’t keep reading this. What should have been a wildly inventive narrative turned out to be the most horrific of tropes packaged with a new shiny bow. The idea of size being related to wealth and the jeopardy it puts you in and the power it can give is interesting in theory, but this execution is trite and weary and dehumanizing and offensive. I hated everything about the 100 pages of this book that I was reading and I literally threw it down in disgust.

Yes, women in the past have often been forced to use their bodies or marry for financial gain or stability. Yes, they still are today. We know, we’ve seen it a million times. Here is a chance to tell a different story and the first 100 pages are spent slogging through this familiar trope with the most offensive female representation I have read in a really long time. Prayer wants to marry rich, but she is portrayed as being wildly manipulative and inept at the same time. She is literally the worst female representation I have read in maybe any book ever. Not because she’s unlikable, I’m fine with unlikable characters, but because she is so horrifically stupid and inept.

It’s not just that I hated Prayer – and I did hate her – it’s that I hated that I was once again forced to read this narrative. Poor girl manipulates man to attain financial gain, is inept and must be “saved” by the talents of her brother, is willing to use the poor little lost puppy to get what she wants even though she knows she is actively hurting him. She’s like all the worst female tropes rolled into one stunningly offensive package.

As I read this book, my teenage daughter was reading another book in the back seat and I thought to myself, I really don’t want her to read this. I’m tired of people telling her and girls like her that all they have to offer to this world is their bodies, their affection, and marrying for financial gain. And I don’t want my teen boys (and here I mean the teens I serve) reading this book because I’m tired of them growing up with this narrative and developing these views of girls. It’s just a destructive cycle that we read over and over and over again.

It’s so completely demeaning to girls. To women.

Now here’s the deal: I 100% admit that I have not finished this book and I have no intention of doing so. It’s possible that somehow later in the book Andrews redeems Prayer as a character, that Warner isn’t the one to save them all, but I don’t want to have to slog through more of the same old offensive narratives to get there. I’m just refusing to do so. I don’t care how the story ends because I’m tired of it beginning in the same old ways.

This is speculative fiction. Here is a chance to tell a wildly inventive story, to flip the script. But Andrews doesn’t choose to start his story that way and I refuse to give it any more of my time. I’m done with these types of narratives where girls must sell their bodies or affections in some way to attain stability. I’m done with these types of narratives that perpetuate the idea of the cold, calculating woman who will do whatever it takes to whomever it takes for money and stability. And I’m done with the stupid girls trope that we initially see in Prayer. And I’m done with the idea that this is the only idea Prayer and her mother could come up with and yet she still needs her brother’s skill to help make it work, to save her. Everything about this book was offensive to me and made me rage.

I’m ready for something new and I’m not willing to slog my way through 100 or more pages of the same ole, same ole tropes to maybe possibly get there.

Readers deserve better.

Women deserve better.

Whatever pay off there may be at the end of this book, if any, I’m not willing to make the journey to get there.

DNF and not recommended

Publisher’s Book Description:

In an alternate reality a lot like our world, every person’s physical size is directly proportional to their wealth. The poorest of the poor are the size of rats, and billionaires are the size of skyscrapers.

Warner and his sister Prayer are destitute—and tiny. Their size is not just demeaning, but dangerous: day and night they face mortal dangers that bigger richer people don’t ever have to think about, from being mauled by cats to their house getting stepped on. There are no cars or phones built small enough for them, or schools or hospitals, for that matter—there’s no point, when no one that little has any purchasing power, and when salaried doctors and teachers would never fit in buildings so small. Warner and Prayer know their only hope is to scale up, but how can two littlepoors survive in a world built against them?

A brilliant, warm, funny trip, unlike anything else out there, and a social novel for our time in the tradition of 1984 or Invisible Man. Inequality is made intensely visceral by an adventure and tragedy both hilarious and heartbreaking.

Book Review: Monsters Beware! by Jorge Aguirre and Rafael Rosado, a guest review by Callum (age 11)

Publisher’s description

monsters bewareClaudette is back AGAIN, and she’s ready to kick major monster butt!

She’s fought giants, clobbered dragons, and now Claudette faces her biggest challenge yet… herself! Well, that and a gang of vile monsters. It all begins when Claudette’s town hosts the annual Warrior Games. After some sneaky maneuvering, Claudette manages to gets herself, Marie, and Gaston chosen as her town’s representatives. But none of Claudette’s past battles has prepared her for this. And to make matters worse, they must stop the vicious Sea Queen and her evil children from using the Warrior Games to free the dark Wizard Grombach and conquer the world!

In Monsters Beware!, the third and final book of the Claudette graphic novel series, Claudette is put the ultimate test. With her honor on the line will she learn that there’s more to a fight than just winning?


Callum’s thoughts

This graphic novel is about a kid named Claudette and her friends. There’s something going on in town called the Warrior Games and she wants to participate because her mom did. The Games are like a coliseum thing where you fight monsters and stuff, but this time it was just chores, like churning butter and plowing. There’s another kingdom that participated in this, the Sea Kingdom, which turned into monsters and started eating the other contestants. The same monster ate Claudette’s mother. The final games are between Claudette’s team and the Sea Kingdom. The town unveiled a statue that was like an evil wizard frozen in amber and they (the Sea Kingdom) want Claudette’s sword to free him so the wizard can rule the land. At the end, there’s a giant battle where all four monsters combine and turn into a GIANT monster. It starts to destroy the town, so Claudette gets her dad’s sword and is going to attack the monster. Claudette’s brother knows an ice spell that he was using to make snacks with and then the giant monster gets frozen by her brother. Then Claudette smashes it to pieces. Everyone who was eaten comes back out and she sees her mom.


I really liked the art and the story—it’s really good. I liked how it was written and the suspense in it. I kind of liked the Hunger Games vibe to it. It will appeal to lots of kids, especially kids that like adventures.


Review copy courtesy of the publisher

ISBN-13: 9781626721807
Publisher: First Second
Publication date: 03/13/2018
Series: Chronicles of Claudette Series

What’s New in LGBTQIA+ YA March 2018

tltbutton7It’s time for another roundup for new and forthcoming YA (and sometimes not YA) books featuring LGBTQIA+ characters.  The titles I’m including here have LGBTQIA+ main characters as well as secondary characters (in some cases parents), as well as anthologies that include LGBTQIA+ stories. Know of a title I missed in this list? Or know of a forthcoming title that should be on my radar for an upcoming list? Leave a comment or tweet me @CiteSomething. This list covers March 2018 titles. Head over to this link for the previous post (February 2018 titles) in this series. All annotations here are via the publishers/Goodreads. I also have a 2017 master list and am working on one for 2018. I’m happy to send you the list if you’re interested. Tweet at me or email me to request the list. I’m amanda DOT macgregor AT gmail DOT com.

Looking for more information on LGBTQIA+ books or issues? Check out the hashtag here on TLT and go visit YA Pride and LGBTQ Reads, two phenomenal resources. 


March 2018


inkmistressInkmistress by Audrey Coulthurst (ISBN-13: 9780062433282 Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers Publication date: 03/06/2018)

A sweeping, action-packed, and romantic fantasy full of dangerous magic and dark choices, perfect for fans of Tamora Pierce and Kristin Cashore—set in the same world as Of Fire and Stars.

Asra is a demigod with a dangerous gift: the ability to dictate the future by writing with her blood. To keep her power secret, she leads a quiet life as a healer on a remote mountain, content to help the people in her care and spend time with Ina, the mortal girl she loves.

But Asra’s peaceful life is upended when bandits threaten Ina’s village and the king does nothing to help. Desperate to protect her people, Ina begs Asra for assistance in finding her manifest—the animal she’ll be able to change into as her rite of passage to adulthood. Asra uses her blood magic to help Ina, but her spell goes horribly wrong and the bandits destroy the village, killing Ina’s family.

Unaware that Asra is at fault, Ina swears revenge on the king and takes a savage dragon as her manifest. To stop her, Asra must embark on a journey across the kingdom, becoming a player in lethal games of power among assassins, gods, and even the king himself.

Most frightening of all, she discovers the dark secrets of her own mysterious history—and the terrible, powerful legacy she carries in her blood.


ps i missP.S. I Miss You by Jen Petro-Roy (ISBN-13: 9781250123480 Publisher: Feiwel & Friends Publication date: 03/06/2018)

A heartbreaking—yet ultimately uplifting—epistolary novel about family, religion, and having the courage to be yourself.


Evie is heartbroken when her strict Catholic parents send her pregnant sister, Cilla, away to stay with a distant great-aunt. All Evie wants is for her older sister to come back. Forbidden from speaking to Cilla, Evie secretly sends her letters.

Evie writes about her family, torn apart and hurting. She writes about her life, empty without Cilla. And she writes about the new girl in school, June, who becomes her friend, and then maybe more than a friend.

Evie could really use some advice from Cilla. But Cilla isn’t writing back, and it’s time for Evie to take matters into her own hands.

P.S. I Miss You by Jen Petro-Roy is a heartfelt middle grade novel dealing with faith, identity, and finding your way in difficult times.


the beauty that remainsThe Beauty That Remains by Ashley Woodfolk (ISBN-13: 9781524715878 Publisher: Random House Children’s Books Publication date: 03/06/2018)

Told from three diverse points of view, this story of life and love after loss is one Angie Thomas, NYT bestselling author of The Hate U Give, calls a “stunning, heart-wrenching look at grief that will stay with you long after you put it down.”

Autumn always knew exactly who she was: a talented artist and a loyal friend. Shay was defined by two things: her bond with her twin sister, Sasha, and her love of music. And Logan has always turned to writing love songs when his real love life was a little less than perfect.

But when tragedy strikes each of them, somehow music is no longer enough. Now Logan is a guy who can’t stop watching vlogs of his dead ex-boyfriend. Shay is a music blogger who’s struggling to keep it together. And Autumn sends messages that she knows can never be answered.

Despite the odds, one band’s music will reunite them and prove that after grief, beauty thrives in the people left behind.


feederFeeder by Patrick Weekes (ISBN-13: 9781534400160 Publisher: Margaret K. McElderry Books Publication date: 03/06/2018)

A monster-hunter teams up with super-powered teens to protect her brother in this fast-paced adventure novel that’s X-Men meets Men in Black.

Lori Fisher hunts monsters. Not with a sword or a gun, but with an interdimensional creature called Handler. Together they take down “feeders”—aliens who prey on mankind. When Lori touches a feeder, Handler’s impossibly large jaws appear and drag the beast into another dimension.

It’s a living—or was, until a job for the Lake Foundation goes wrong, and Lori stumbles across the Nix, a group of mutant teenagers held captive on the docks. Now the Lake Foundation is hunting Lori, and if they find Lori, they find Ben, the brother Lori would do anything to protect. There’s only one thing to do: strike first.

Lori teams up with the Nix to take on Lake, and to discover why the Nix were kidnapped in the first place. But as she watches their powers unfold, Lori realizes the Nix are nothing like her. She has no powers. She has…Handler. Maybe she’s not the monster hunter after all. Maybe she’s just the bait.


ivyIvy Aberdeen’s Letter to the World by Ashley Herring Blake (ISBN-13: 9780316515467 Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers Publication date: 03/06/2018)

In the wake of a destructive tornado, one girl develops feelings for another in this stunning, tender novel about emerging identity, perfect for fans of The Thing About Jellyfish.

When a tornado rips through town, twelve-year-old Ivy Aberdeen’s house is destroyed and her family of five is displaced. Ivy feels invisible and ignored in the aftermath of the storm—and what’s worse, her notebook filled with secret drawings of girls holding hands has gone missing.

Mysteriously, Ivy’s drawings begin to reappear in her locker with notes from someone telling her to open up about her identity. Ivy thinks—and hopes—that this someone might be her classmate, another girl for whom Ivy has begun to develop a crush. Will Ivy find the strength and courage to follow her true feelings?

Ivy Aberdeen’s Letter to the World exquisitely enriches the rare category of female middle-grade characters who like girls—and children’s literature at large.



titanic summerTitanic Summer by Russell J. Sanders (ISBN-13: 9781640801851 Publisher: Dreamspinner Press Publication date: 03/06/2018)

It’s 2015, and teenage Jake Hardy is hiding something. During a summer trip to the Titanic Mecca of Halifax, Nova Scotia, Jake’s father makes a confession, and though Jake feels upset and confused, he also wants to be understanding. But he feels deceived—much like he’s deceiving those he cares about. Jake is gay, just not ready to tell the world.

Jake and his father are far from alone in their secrets, as Jake discovers back in Texas, where the fight for and against the Equal Rights Ordinance rages. He’s surprised to learn how much the outcome will affect his friends, and he’s torn between standing with them and the wishes of his religious fanatic mother. Being true to himself won’t be easy or painless, and it will come with sacrifices—and rewards.


boomerangBoomerang by Helene Dunbar (ISBN-13: 9781510713215 Publisher: Sky Pony Press Publication date: 03/06/2018)

Michael Sterling disappeared from his Maine town five years ago. Everyone assumed he was kidnapped. The truth is worse—he ran away and found the life he always dreamed of.

Now, at seventeen, he’s Sean Woodhouse. And he’s come “home,” to the last place he wants to ever be, to claim the small inheritance his grandparents promised him when he graduated high school, all so he can save Trip, the boy he developed an intense and complicated relationship with while he was away.

Sean has changed, but so has his old town and everyone in it. And knowing who he is and where he belongs is more confusing than ever. As his careful plans begin to crumble, so does everything he’s believed about his idyllic other life.


radical elementThe Radical Element: 12 Stories of Daredevils, Debutantes & Other Dauntless Girls by Jessica Spotswood (ISBN-13: 9780763694258 Publisher: Candlewick Press Publication date: 03/13/2018)

In an anthology of revolution and resistance, a sisterhood of YA writers shines a light on a century and a half of heroines on the margins and in the intersections.

To respect yourself, to love yourself, should not have to be a radical decision. And yet it remains as challenging for an American girl to make today as it was in 1927 on the steps of the Supreme Court. It’s a decision that must be faced when you’re balancing on the tightrope of neurodivergence, finding your way as a second-generation immigrant, or facing down American racism even while loving America. And it’s the only decision when you’ve weighed society’s expectations and found them wanting. In The Radical Element, twelve of the most talented writers working in young adult literature today tell the stories of girls of all colors and creeds standing up for themselves and their beliefs — whether that means secretly learning Hebrew in early Savannah, using the family magic to pass as white in 1920s Hollywood, or singing in a feminist punk band in 1980s Boston. And they’re asking you to join them.

Original stories by:
Dahlia Adler
Erin Bowman
Dhonielle Clayton
Sara Farizan
Mackenzi Lee
Stacey Lee
Anna-Marie McLemore
Meg Medina
Marieke Nijkamp
Megan Shepherd
Jessica Spotswood
Sarvenaz Tash


my shotMy Shot: Balancing It All and Standing Tall by Elena Delle Donne (ISBN-13: 9781534412286 Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers Publication date: 03/13/2018)

Elena Delle Donne, 2015 WNBA MVP and 2016 Olympic gold medalist, shares her inspirational story of being a young basketball prodigy who gave up an impressive basketball scholarship for family and self-discovery.

Elena Delle Donne has always forged her own path. During her first year of college, she walked away from a scholarship and chance to play for Geno Aurriema at UConn—the most prestigious women’s college basketball program—so she could stay in her home state of Delaware and be close to her older sister, Lizzie, who has several disabilities and can only communicate through hand-over-hand signing.

Burned out and questioning her passion for basketball, she attended the University of Delaware and took up volleyball for a year. Eventually she found her way back to her first love, playing basketball for the Blue Hens, ultimately leading them, a mid-major team, to the Sweet Sixteen. She went on to become the second overall selection during the 2013 WNBA draft and the WNBA’s 2015 MVP.

Elena Delle Donne delivers a powerful and motivational story of overcoming the challenges of competitive sports through balancing hard work and the support of a loving family.



like vanessaLike Vanessa by Tami Charles, Vanessa Brantley-Newton (ISBN-13: 9781580897778 Publisher: Charlesbridge Publication date: 03/13/2018)

In this semi-autobiographical debut novel set in 1983, Vanessa Martin’s real-life reality of living with family in public housing in Newark, New Jersey is a far cry from the glamorous Miss America stage. She struggles with an incarcerated mother she barely remembers, a grandfather dealing with addiction and her own battle with self-confidence. But when a new teacher at school coordinates a beauty pageant and convinces Vanessa to enter, Vanessa’s view of her own world begins to change. Vanessa discovers that her own self-worth is more than the scores of her talent performance and her interview answers, and that she doesn’t need a crown to be comfortable in her own skin and see her own true beauty.



a possibilityA Possibility of Whales by Karen Rivers (ISBN-13: 9781616207236 Publisher: Algonquin Young Readers Publication date: 03/13/2018)

Twelve-year-old Natalia Rose Baleine Gallagher loves possibilities: the possibility that she’ll see whales on the beach near her new home, the possibility that the trans­gender boy she just met will become her new best friend, the possibility that the paparazzi hounding her celebrity father won’t force them to move again. Most of all, Nat dreams of the possibility that her faraway mother misses her, loves her, and is just waiting for Nat to find her.

But how can Nat find her mother if she doesn’t even know who she is? She abandoned Nat as a baby, and Nat’s dad refuses to talk about it. Nat knows she shouldn’t need a mom, but she still feels like something is missing, and her questions lead her on a journey of self-discovery that will change her life forever.


fire songFire Song by Adam Garnet Jones (ISBN-13: 9781554519774 Publisher: Annick Press, Limited Publication date: 03/13/2018)

How can Shane reconcile his feelings for David with his desire for a better life?
Shane is still reeling from the suicide of his kid sister, Destiny. How could he have missed the fact that she was so sad? He tries to share his grief with his girlfriend, Tara, but she’s too concerned with her own needs to offer him much comfort. What he really wants is to be able to turn to the one person on the rez whom he loves—his friend, David.
Things go from bad to worse as Shane’s dream of going to university is shattered and his grieving mother withdraws from the world. Worst of all, he and David have to hide their relationship from everyone. Shane feels that his only chance of a better life is moving to Toronto, but David refuses to join him. When yet another tragedy strikes, the two boys have to make difficult choices about their future together.
With deep insight into the life of Indigenous people on the reserve, this book masterfully portrays how a community looks to the past for guidance and comfort while fearing a future of poverty and shame. Shane’s rocky road to finding himself takes many twists and turns, but ultimately ends with him on a path that doesn’t always offer easy answers, but one that leaves the reader optimistic about his fate.

miles awayMiles Away from You by A.B. Rutledge (ISBN-13: 9781328852335 Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publication date: 03/20/2018)

From debut voice A.B. Rutledge comes a quirky and completely fresh story of young love, loss, and the drastic distances we sometimes have to travel in order to move on, perfect for fans of Adam Silvera and Jandy Nelson. Explores gender nonconformity and the spectrum of sexual preference in an authentic way.

It’s been three years since Miles fell for Vivian, a talented and dazzling transgender girl. Eighteen months since a suicide attempt left Vivian on life support. Now Miles isn’t sure who he is without her, but knows it’s time to figure out how to say goodbye.

He books a solo trip to Iceland but then has a hard time leaving the refuge of his hotel room. After a little push from Oskar, a local who is equal parts endearing and aloof, Miles decides to honor Vivian’s life by photographing her treasured Doc Martens standing empty against the surreal landscapes. With each step he takes, Miles finds his heart healing—even as he must accept that Vivian, still in a coma, will never recover.

Told through a series of instant messages to Vivian, this quirky and completely fresh novel explores love, loss, and the drastic distances we sometimes have to travel in order to move on.


burroBurro Hills by Julia Lynn Rubin (ISBN-13: 9781635761948 Publisher: Diversion Publishing Publication date: 03/20/2018)

In a town like Burro Hills, you either figure out who you are or die trying.

Seventeen-year-old Jack has lived in the troubled California town his entire life. He hides the truth about his sexuality from everyone, including his best friend Jess and his childhood rival and drug dealing partner, Toby. Keeping your head down, Jack knows, is the best way to survive.

But when Connor, a fearless new arrival, enrolls at school, he sees right through Jack’s façade. Jack finds himself falling for Connor, and the feeling is mutual—but their relationship will set into a motion a series of events with lasting consequences. After a falling out with Jess, Jack is worried to see her growing close to the manipulative Toby. To make matters worse, Jack is becoming increasingly paranoid that Toby will expose his relationship with Connor.

As tensions rise and more secrets come to a head, Jack cuts off ties with Toby. Hungry for revenge, Toby comes after Jack, jeopardizing his budding romance with Connor and the life he’s tried so hard to salvage in Burro Hills.


and she wasAnd She Was by Jessica Verdi (ISBN-13: 9781338150537 Publisher: Scholastic, Inc. Publication date: 03/27/2018)
Dara’s lived a sheltered life with her single mom, Mellie. Now, at eighteen, she’s dreaming of more. When Dara digs up her never-before-seen birth certificate, her world implodes. Why are two strangers listed as her parents?

Dara confronts her mother, and is stunned by what she learns: Mellie is transgender. The unfamiliar name listed under “father”? That’s Mellie. She transitioned when Dara was a baby, after Dara’s birth mother died. She changed her name, started over.

But Dara still has more questions than answers. Reeling, she sets off on an impromptu road trip with her best guy friend, Sam, in tow. She is determined to find the extended family she’s never even met. What she does discover — and what her mother reveals, piece by piece, over emails — will challenge and change Dara more than she can imagine.

This is a gorgeous, timely, and essential novel about the importance of being our true selves. The back matter includes an author’s note and resources for readers.


hurricanHurricane Child by Kheryn Callender (ISBN-13: 9781338129304 Publisher: Scholastic, Inc. Publication date: 03/27/2018)

Caroline Murphy is a Hurricane Child.

Being born during a hurricane is unlucky, and twelve-year-old Caroline has had her share of bad luck lately. She’s hated and bullied by everyone in her small school on St. Thomas of the US Virgin Islands, a spirit only she can see won’t stop following her, and — worst of all — Caroline’s mother left home one day and never came back.

But when a new student named Kalinda arrives, Caroline’s luck begins to turn around. Kalinda, a solemn girl from Barbados with a special smile for everyone, becomes Caroline’s first and only friend — and the person for whom Caroline has begun to develop a crush.

Now, Caroline must find the strength to confront her feelings for Kalinda, brave the spirit stalking her through the islands, and face the reason her mother abandoned her. Together, Caroline and Kalinda must set out in a hurricane to find Caroline’s missing mother — before Caroline loses her forever.


pros of consThe Pros of Cons by Alison Cherry, Lindsay Ribar, Michelle Schusterman (ISBN-13: 9781338151725 Publisher: Scholastic, Inc. Publication date: 03/27/2018)

Drummer Phoebe Byrd prides herself on being one of the guys, and she’s ready to prove it by kicking all their butts in the snare solo competition at the Indoor Percussion Association Convention.

Writer Vanessa Montoya-O’Callaghan has been looking forward to the WTFcon for months. Not just because of the panels and fanfiction readings but because WTFcon is where she’ll finally meet Soleil, her internet girlfriend, for the first time.

Taxidermy assistant Callie Buchannan might be good at scooping brains out of deer skulls, but that doesn’t mean it’s her passion. Since her parents’ divorce, her taxidermist father only cares about his work, and assisting him at the World Taxidermy and Fish-Carving Championships is the only way Callie knows to connect with him.

When a crazy mix-up in the hotel lobby brings the three girls together, they form an unlikely friendship against a chaotic background of cosplay, competition, and carcasses!


i have lostI Have Lost My Way by Gayle Forman (ISBN-13: 9780425290774 Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group Publication date: 03/27/2018)

A powerful display of empathy and friendship from the #1 New York Times Bestselling author of If I Stay.

Around the time that Freya loses her voice while recording her debut album, Harun is making plans to run away from home to find the boy that he loves, and Nathaniel is arriving in New York City after a family tragedy leaves him isolated on the outskirts of Washington state. After the three of them collide in Central Park, they slowly reveal the parts of their past that they haven’t been able to confront, and together, they find their way back to who they’re supposed to be.

Told over the course of a single day from three different perspectives, Gayle Forman’s newest novel about the power of friendship and being true to who you are is filled with the elegant prose that her fans have come to know and love.

Event Recap: NoVa Teen Book Festival by Michelle Biwer

IMG-0783The 5th Annual NoVa Teen Book Festival was held this past Saturday, March 10th in Arlington, VA. It is a completely free event to attend, although advanced registration is encouraged. Due to partnerships with local schools and public libraries, the majority of attendees were teens although all are welcome. 30+ Young Adult authors were present for various programming throughout the day, most of them local to the DC area. Anna-Marie McLemore was the wonderful keynote speaker. She spoke about her childhood growing up as a queer Mexican-American, the obstacles she faced from society due to her identity, and how she gained the confidence to write the queer, Latinx, magical realism she publishes today.

It was my second time attending NoVa Teen and the events team has made this festival even bigger and better for educators and for teens. There was a variety of panels, and attendees could choose from at least 3 events going on at any given time. In addition to the main panels, there was an all day “game room” that was popular with teens who watched a rotating set of authors fail at charades and Balderdash. A feature I haven’t seen at other book festivals were small group breakout sessions. If you chose to attend a breakout session you had the valuable opportunity to pick the brain of one or two authors in a small classroom setting. At the end of the day, most of the authors stayed to sign their books and meet attendees.

The festival also had a series of programming for educators. I attended a few events where authors booktalked their books and educators had the opportunity to ask questions about school visits, the age groups their books was most popular with, etc…I had no idea how many debut novelists were in the DC Metro area and meeting some of them has inspired me to look into setting up more author events at my own library.

Sunday Reflections: It’s Okay to Sit a Moment in Your Pain


Vague spoilers for A Wrinkle in Time appear in this post. If you are totally unfamiliar with the story, read at your own risk of being spoiled.

At the beginning of A Wrinkle in Time, Meg Murray’s father has been missing for 4 years. It’s the 4 year anniversary in fact as she sits in the prinicipal’s office and he tells her that it’s time to move past her hurt and be the good girl Meg that they all miss, in part because that Meg was easier to deal with.

Around the 1 year anniversary of a very complicated pregnancy loss that almost took my life my pastor told me the same thing.

People like to put limit on other people’s pain.

You see it time and time again on social media. Smile, be happy, put it in perspective. Those constant memes with glorious sunsets that remind us all that these are First World Problems, that someone somewhere definitely has it worse, and if you just think positive thoughts and choose to smile then life is really awesome.

It’s a Lego Movie mentality.

Everything is Awesome.

Except, of course, when it’s not.

The truth is, it’s okay to sit for a moment in your pain. It’s actually important that we do so. We have to take the time to really and truly grapple with our life experiences and the emotions that they cause in us. The way that those moments change the landscape of who we are.

Because that’s what they do, moments of pain can change who we are. When a piece of us is stolen, when we learn a horrific truth about the reality of life, when we are betrayed or let down, or when we betray or let down others. It changes you. And yes, that changing doesn’t have to be some permanent hardship, but it’s okay if you sit in the darkness of your soul for a while and really wrestle with what it means to be hurting and human.

“Everybody loves you when you’re easy,” sings Sarah McClachlan in the song Black and White. That lyric has always stuck with me because I recognize the truth of it. Sitting with someone as they sit in their pain is hard.

For a while, Meg Murray sits in her pain. She steeps herself in it. Her father is missing. She doesn’t know what happened to him or what it means. She is entitled to her pain. She is entitled to her anger. No matter how uncomfortable it makes us.

But she doesn’t stay there, because one of the things A Wrinkle in Time is ultimately about is hope. And love. And healing. Meg finds hope and in finding that hope, she learns more about herself and her place in the world. Meg Murray takes a grand adventure and moves from anger to hope, but she does so in part because she learns that the source of her pain can be found, her questions answered, her world righted again. Not every child gets that chance. For every found father there are fathers who have no desire to be found. For every sister screaming into the darkness I love you and I always will, there are sisters who won’t answer the phone and haven’t talked to their siblings in years. Meg Murray is one of the lucky ones.

Lots of our kids are not, in fact, Meg Murray. Breakfast will not magically appear tomorrow morning. A loving Dad will not be rescued from the darkness. Bullies won’t reconsider the harm they are causing to those that they bully.

Yesterday I sat in the movies with my two daughters and I watched a childhood favorite come to life, and I was profoundly moved to share this inspiring moment with my girls. I looked over at them and I wept as they saw a family come back together in love and heard time and time again the affirmations made to our dear Meg.

But I also thought about every one of my kids who won’t get that, the happy ending and the words of affirmation. And my heart also ached. But also I thought about this: it’s okay that Meg needed to sit for a while in her pain and anger. Sometimes that’s where we need to be. And we need to allow our kids and teens to be honest with themselves and with their pain while also giving them hope that they can move out of the darkness. And that, ultimately, is the hope that A Wrinkle in Time provides. We can fight the darkness, but it is, indeed, a fight.

Friday Finds: March 9, 2018

fridayfindsThis Week at TLT

Around the Web

Making Elementary School A Lot More Fun: Like Preschool!

A Diversity & Cultural Literacy Toolkit

Great Graphic Novels for Teens 2019 (#GGN2019) Nominee Round Up

EW has your exclusive first look at The Wicked King

20 Kid and Teen Books Hollywood Should Adapt After ‘A Wrinkle in Time’

Two YA authors on why they’re telling stories of hope in the Trump era


Book Review: After the Shot Drops by Randy Ribay

Publisher’s description

after the shotA powerful novel about friendship, basketball, and one teen’s mission to create a better life for his family in the tradition of Jason Reynolds, Matt de la Pena, and Walter Dean Myers.     
Bunny and Nasir have been best friends forever, but when Bunny accepts an athletic scholarship across town, Nasir feels betrayed. While Bunny tries to fit in with his new, privileged peers, Nasir spends more time with his cousin, Wallace, who is being evicted. Nasir can’t help but wonder why the neighborhood is falling over itself to help Bunny when Wallace is in trouble.

When Wallace makes a bet against Bunny, Nasir is faced with an impossible decision—maybe a dangerous one.
Told from alternating perspectives, After the Shot Drops is a heart-pounding story about the responsibilities of great talent and the importance of compassion.


Amanda’s thoughts

This fast-paced story of choices, compassion, and consequences is the kind of book you need to read in one sitting. Both the stakes and the tension are high, the characters are dynamic and complicated, and, because of the dramatic principle of Chekhov’s gun, you can be pretty sure you know what’s eventually coming, but it’s still shocking and somehow a surprise.


For Bunny Thompson (nicknamed Bunny “because I got the hops”), a talented basketball player who likely has a huge career ahead of him, transferring to a private school in the suburbs seemed like a good choice. He will get to play on a great team, get a better education, and hopefully get noticed even more, which will all lead to him hopefully being recruited heavily and eventually able to help out his family (which consists of his older sister, who is in college, his twin little sisters, his nurse mother, who works the graveyard shift at the hospital, and his dad, who owns a bookstore). But Bunny grows conflicted about his choice as his time at St. Sebastian’s goes on. He’s one of a handful of black kids, feels like he has nothing in common with his classmates, and often feels like some sort of mascot. To his best friend Nasir and many others in their neighborhood, Bunny’s move feels like a betrayal, a rejection, like he’s leaving everyone behind and thinks he’s better than they are. Nasir and Bunny go months without talking, though it’s clear that both boys miss each other and would like to be able to bridge the gulf between them. But for Nasir, that’s an especially complicated idea, thanks to his cousin Wallace.


Wallace is no fan of Bunny. His only real friend is Nasir, who would love to be able to help Wallace and his grandma, who are about to be evicted, but doesn’t really have any resources to do that. So he tries to help by encouraging Wallace to get a job to help with bills, by being in Wallace’s corner and advocating for him and defending him, even though Nasir’s parents think Wallace is a bad influence. Wallace tries to get some money by making shady deals and placing bets that he isn’t good for. Bunny and Nasir repeatedly approach each other to try to mend their friendship, but each time, Nasir feels like he’s betraying Wallace, that Bunny has plenty of people in his corner, and plenty of resources and opportunities, but Wallace has nothing and no one. Wallace eventually puts Nasir—and Bunny—in an impossible situation, one that will test everyone’s loyalty, and the already high stakes of this story really ramp up. Readers will race through the final chapters to see what happens to all three of these complicated and conflicted characters.


Told through an incredibly effective alternation narration, readers get to see deep inside the minds of both Bunny and Nasir. who show that the situation is much more complicated than just being about two best friends driven apart by Bunny’s choice to change schools. Gripping, suspenseful, and complex, this story of basketball, friendship, courage, desperation, and choices will appeal to a wide audience. A must-have for all collections. 


Review copy courtesy of the publisher

ISBN-13: 9781328702272
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date: 03/06/2018

Book Review: The Night Diary by Veera Hiranandani

Publisher’s description

night diaryIn the vein of Inside Out and Back Again and The War That Saved My Life comes a poignant, personal, and hopeful tale of India’s partition, and of one girl’s journey to find a new home in a divided country

It’s 1947, and India, newly independent of British rule, has been separated into two countries: Pakistan and India. The divide has created much tension between Hindus and Muslims, and hundreds of thousands are killed crossing borders.

Half-Muslim, half-Hindu twelve-year-old Nisha doesn’t know where she belongs, or what her country is anymore. When Papa decides it’s too dangerous to stay in what is now Pakistan, Nisha and her family become refugees and embark first by train but later on foot to reach her new home. The journey is long, difficult, and dangerous, and after losing her mother as a baby, Nisha can’t imagine losing her homeland, too. But even if her country has been ripped apart, Nisha still believes in the possibility of putting herself back together.

Told through Nisha’s letters to her mother, The Night Diary is a heartfelt story of one girl’s search for home, for her own identity…and for a hopeful future.


Amanda’s thoughts

This was another of those rare books that I read in one sitting, ignoring all of the other things I was supposed to do, allowing myself to be sucked into this book and its world.

Nisha, an introvert who rarely speaks to people outside of her family, begins keeping a diary in July 1947, after Kazi, the family chef, gives her a blank book for her 12th birthday. She narrates her life and the events unfolding around her in letters to her Muslim mother, who died while giving birth to Nisha and Amil, her twin brother. Nisha’s father is Hindu (as are Nisha and Amil), and Kazi is Muslim. Nisha is used to being friends with Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs, but that all changes when Partition happens. Nisha struggles to understand how India will soon be free from British rule, but will be divided up into two countries, one for Muslims and one for Hindus and Sikhs. Where they live will now be part of Pakistan, where Muslims will live. Nisha and her family must leave behind Kazi and make the perilous journey to their new home on foot. The trip is long, and they have very little food or water. As they grow more exhausted and dehydrated, Nisha becomes sure that she, Amil, her father, and their grandmother will all die. Their destination, while ultimately the new India, is first making it to Rashid Uncle’s house, halfway to the border. Rashid is their mother’s brother, someone Nisha has never met before. Their time there is precious, with Nisha recognizing so much of herself and her mother in Rashid. Leaving his house, being displaced yet again, is hard for Nisha. The remainder of their trip is horrific and frightening, but they arrive safely in their new home, where an unexpected surprise helps Nisha feel like this is more like home.


This intimate look at Partition, families, and identity is beautifully written and especially engaging due to the diary/letters format. A solid read for those looking for historical fiction, books about India’s history and culture, or refugees. 

An author’s note explains that this novel is loosely based on her father’s family’s experience. A glossary is appended.



Review copy courtesy of the publisher

ISBN-13: 9780735228511
Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date: 03/06/2018

YA A to Z: “Fake News” and Disinformation, a guest post by Diana Rodriguez Wallach

Today for YA A to Z author Diana Rodriguez Wallach is talking with us about disinformation and “fake news”.


I’m often asked, “What sort of research did you do for your novel?” For me, that’s a loaded question. The Anastasia Phoenix series is set around the world, so I traveled overseas to Italy, England, and Brazil to create some of the settings for my novels. That’s research! (Or so I tell my husband.) My books also deal with conspiracy theories of real historical events, so there was a lot of Googling that could have gotten me flagged by the FBI. Then, there were the in-person interviews, the real life people who inspired the characters in my books and who helped me portray the espionage world of disinformation. For me, the most important interview came from a professor at Boston University.

I was a journalism major in college back in the late 1990s. (Yeah, I’m giving my age.) At the time, one of the professors in the College of Communication was a man named Larry Martin Bittman (formerly Ladislav Bittman). He was the former Deputy Director of Disinformation for Czechoslovakia during the Cold War—a real life Communist spy who went on to teach budding journalists how to tell when they were being fed disinformation.


At the time I started writing PROOF OF LIES, way back in 2008, Trump had yet to coin the term “fake news.” In fact, I hadn’t really heard of the concept outside of wartime propaganda. But because of that professor from BU, who generously met with me in his home in Massachusetts to discuss my novel, I decided to give this specialty to the spies in my book.

fake news | Lesson Plan | PBS NewsHour Extra

It’s a research dream come true. Now, not only do I get to wander the streets of Rome claiming I need to taste the gelato for “book research,” but I also get to spend months in a deep dive into conspiracy theories. All of the historical moments I twist in my novels are based on real events. One of my favorite compliments from reviewers is when they state that “The Truth” page at the end of my novels made the books stand out even more.

(FILES) This file picture taken on May 9, 1978 in Via Caetani near the Communist Party headquarters, in central Rome shows Aldo Moro's bullet-riddled body, found in the boot of a car. Thirty years since the Red Brigade leftist militant group killed former prime minister Aldo Moro, many Italians still blame his death on what they see as a self-interested political class. Most remember the moment they learned on March 16, 1978, that the former Christian Democrat leader had been kidnapped and five bodyguards had been killed. Fifty-four days later, on May 9, Moro's body was found in the boot of a car halfway between the Rome headquarters of his party and that of the Italian Communist Party (PCI), symbolising his killers' disdain for Moro's proposed "middle way" associating the two parties. AFP PHOTO/FILES/UPI (Photo credit should read OFF/AFP/Getty Images)

(FILES) This file picture taken on May 9, 1978 in Via Caetani near the Communist Party headquarters, in central Rome shows Aldo Moro’s bullet-riddled body, found in the boot of a car. Thirty years since the Red Brigade leftist militant group killed former prime minister Aldo Moro, many Italians still blame his death on what they see as a self-interested political class. Most remember the moment they learned on March 16, 1978, that the former Christian Democrat leader had been kidnapped and five bodyguards had been killed. Fifty-four days later, on May 9, Moro’s body was found in the boot of a car halfway between the Rome headquarters of his party and that of the Italian Communist Party (PCI), symbolising his killers’ disdain for Moro’s proposed “middle way” associating the two parties. AFP PHOTO/FILES/UPI (Photo credit should read OFF/AFP/Getty Images)

So was Aldo Moro, the prime minister of Italy, really kidnapped, murdered, and left in the trunk of a car in 1978? Yes, and there are a lot of people who don’t believe the Red Brigades, the communist group blamed for the crime, did it. Were hundreds of journalists and military officersunjustly imprisoned in Turkey in 2010 over a fake coup plot? Yes, and to date no one has been brought to justice for those lengthy false imprisonments. Did soccer super star Ronaldo LuísNazário de Lima of Brazil secretly suffer a seizure before the 1998 World Cup but play anyway? Yup, and people still wonder why,especially after the team’s epic loss.

Do tweens and teens believe “fake news”? – Common Sense Media

I understand the urge to roll your eyes at another “fake news” headline, but remember these types of covert campaigns really exist and have been around a long time. Trust me, I know; I did the research, and you can read all about it in PROOF OF LIES, and its new sequel LIES THAT BIND.

If you want to enjoy some more books on disinformation, here are some I read as research:

The Deception Game; by Ladislav Bittman

The KGB and Soviet Disinformation, an Insider’s View; by Ladislav Bittman

The Women of the OSS, Sisterhood of Spies; by Elizabeth P. McIntosh


About Lies That Bind:

What do you do when you learn your entire childhood was a lie?

Reeling from the truths uncovered while searching for her sister in Italy, Anastasia Phoenix is ready to call it quits with spies. The only way to stop being a pawn in their game is to remove herself from the board. But before she can leave her parents’ crimes behind her, tragedy strikes. No one is safe, not while Department D still exists.

Now, with help from her friends, Anastasia embarks on a dangerous plan to bring down an entire criminal empire. From a fire-filled festival in England to a lavish wedding in Rio de Janeiro, Anastasia is determined to confront the enemies who want to destroy her family. But even Marcus, the handsome bad boy who’s been there for her at every step, is connected to the deadly spy network. And the more she learns about Department D, the more she realizes the true danger might be coming from someone closer than she expects…



About Diana Rodriguez Wallach:



Diana Rodriguez Wallach is the author of the Anastasia Phoenix Series, three young adult spy thrillers (Entangled Publishing, 2017, ’18, ‘19). The first book in the trilogy, Proof of Lies, was named by Paste Magazine as one of the “Top 10 Best Young Adult Books for March 2017.” Bustle also listed her as one of the “Top Nine Latinx Authors to Read for Women’s History Month 2017.” Additionally, she is the author of three award-winning young adult novels: Amor and Summer Secrets, Amigas and School Scandals, and Adios to All The Drama (Kensington Books); as well as a YA short-story collection entitled Mirror, Mirror (Buzz Books, 2013).

She is an advisory board member for the Philly Spells Writing Center, a school-based Workshop Instructor for Mighty Writers in Philadelphia, and has been a Writing Instructor for Johns Hopkins University’s Center for Talented Youth since 2015. She holds a B.S. in Journalism from Boston University, and currently lives in Philadelphia.

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Book Review: P.S. I Miss You by Jen Petro-Roy

Publisher’s description

ps i missA heartbreaking—yet ultimately uplifting—epistolary novel about family, religion, and having the courage to be yourself.


Evie is heartbroken when her strict Catholic parents send her pregnant sister, Cilla, away to stay with a distant great-aunt. All Evie wants is for her older sister to come back. Forbidden from speaking to Cilla, Evie secretly sends her letters.

Evie writes about her family, torn apart and hurting. She writes about her life, empty without Cilla. And she writes about the new girl in school, June, who becomes her friend, and then maybe more than a friend.

Evie could really use some advice from Cilla. But Cilla isn’t writing back, and it’s time for Evie to take matters into her own hands.

P.S. I Miss You by Jen Petro-Roy is a heartfelt middle grade novel dealing with faith, identity, and finding your way in difficult times.


Amanda’s thoughts

Oh, friends. We need SO MANY MORE middle grade books about LGBTQIA+ kids. I can’t wait for the day that kids of all identities can see themselves joyfully and lovingly represented and embraced.

Evie’s path to discovering who she really is is a very complicated and painful one. The entire book is told through letters to her sister Cilla, who at first has no internet/phone access and then later just isn’t responding. At first I couldn’t get past how extremely dated it feels to only be able to communicate through snail mail, but I did get past that once I got caught up in the story. Cilla got pregnant at sixteen and has been sent away from their home in Massachusetts to their great-aunt’s home in Virginia, to have the baby in secret, then to head to an all-girls’ Catholic boarding school after the baby is born and adopted. Evie desperately misses her sister and sends her endless letters, despite only rarely (and tersely) hearing back from Cilla. Evie’s extremely judgmental and withholding parents have retreated into work and baking/hiding away crying since Cilla left, leaving Evie so alone as she navigates some new feelings toward new classmate June. But it’s not like her parents would be comforting or loving to Evie during this time, anyway. The version of Catholicism that they practice is a strict and punishing one, one that makes them shun their pregnant daughter and, Evie is sure, would make them just as quickly disown their lesbian daughter. So she writes to Cilla, despite the silence back, trying to work out her feelings for June and process her sister’s absence. Evie is not at all prepared for what she finds when she goes looking on her own to find her sister. Uncovering a betrayal so profound that it’s hard to imagine it actually happening, Evie is forced to face the lengths some people will go to to maintain appearances and hide secrets. It’s a revelation that will change her life and her perception of her family, religion, and her thoughts on her own identity.


There is so much shame, stigma, and embarrassment here. Their parents constantly talk about how horrible Cilla’s “mistake” and “sin” is. They are mortified, deeply ashamed, and do everything to hide what has happened, including the very outdated-feeling move of sending her away to have the baby in secret. They have completely turned their back on Cilla, not communicating with her, showing any love, or even uttering her name. They remove her pictures from their walls, spin lies to the community about where she is, and even tell an old friend that Evie is their only child. The constant onslaught of shame and judgment toward teen pregnancy honestly got really hard to stomach.


Evie is very, very young-sounding and naive. The story takes place during 7th grade, but quite often, she feels much younger. She initially thinks in pretty simplistic ways (“bad girls get pregnant”). When she meets June, she notes that she’s never met anyone with dyed hair. When she learns June is an atheist, she again notes that she’s never met one. She observes that her sister broke commandments and sinned, but that she’s learned her lesson and won’t sin again. It’s clear how much of her thinking early on in the book has been influenced by her (awful) parents. Her thoughts on everything change and progress as the story unfolds, but for quite a bit of the story she is sheltered, naive, and parroting her parents’ beliefs. This development, this change to having her own opinions on right and wrong, on religion’s role in her life, on things like teen pregnancy and homosexuality, is believable if not always easy to read.


Evie’s relationship with June also develops in a believable, if not always happy, way. Though she recognizes and struggles with the crush she has on June early on, she is so worried that her parents will disown her, that she’s a sinner, that she’s doing something wrong. But she pushes past that and lets herself feel what she feels. Their relationship follows a very typical trajectory for 7th graders—they’re hesitant, nervous, excited, and happy. They hold sweaty hands, kiss (once, then Evie decides she isn’t ready to be doing that), and spend tons of time together. But for much of the book, it’s all in secret. Thankfully, when Evie does tell her best friends what is going on, they react positively. But even when Evie has told June how she feels and they are girlfriends, Evie notes that she still feels a little ashamed of herself for liking a girl.


My hope is that readers can see past the onslaught of shame and stigma, even felt and perpetuated by Evie herself, to see the joy of discovering someone you have a crush on and see how Evie eventually learns to not hide or be ashamed of who she is. A well-written, if deeply uncomfortable and often disheartening, look at identity, family, and secrets. 


Review copy courtesy of the publisher

ISBN-13: 9781250123480
Publisher: Feiwel & Friends
Publication date: 03/06/2018