Teen Librarian Toolbox
Inside Teen Librarian Toolbox

Cindy Crushes Programming: Make and Take Crafts for a Pandemic State of Mind

Today for Cindy Crushes Programming we’re talking about Make and Take Kits. Though a lot of libraries initially swerved to Virtual Programming, with things like curbside pick up now happening, many libraries are starting to think about and put together Make and Take Kits. These are kits where all the supplies are provided for a program activity that patrons can drive through and pick up via curbside. Librarian Cindy Shutts shares some specific Make and Take Kit activities and I talk about some things you’ll want to consider when putting your Make and Take Kits together.

Since many libraries are not having  in person programs for a while including mine. I have been looking at possible make and take crafts. This is a hard one to do because you have to make sure you provide all the supplies that patrons need to complete the craft. Often teen patrons might not have supplies you would assume they have in their homes such as glue and scissors. I tried to think of easy and fun crafts that could be done quickly.One way to find out what supplies teens have by having them sign up ahead of time so you can find out which supplies they need such as markers or crayons. I suggest making a Youtube video or linking to one already made for teens who are visual learners. Do not forget to put the instructions in the bag.

The Classic Pet Rock

Supplies needed:

  • A rock
  • Googly eyes or buttons or beads for the eyes
  • Glue. I am putting glue dots in the kits to make it easier for the teens.
  • Markers

Instructions:

  1. Glue the eyes on the rock
  2. Use marker to add decorations

Nail Polish Splatter Art Tile

Supplies:

  • Tile
  • Nail polish

Instructions:

  1. Make sure your tile is nice and flat.
  2. Drip different colors of nail polish on the tile to create different patterns
  3. Let nail polish dry

DIY Hair Bows

This is based on this previously blogged about craft and you can find instructions at the post.

Some Things to Consider When Creating Make and Take Craft Kits

Do not assume that your patrons will have any of the supplies they need at home, including things like scissors and glue. Provide every supply necessary in the kit itself so that no one takes home a kit and can’t complete it because they don’t have the tools they need at home. Somewhere shared online that they were sending glue dots home in case their kids didn’t have glue. Another person I talked to said they were even sending crayons. In order to make accessible craft kits, you’ll want to include every supply needed.

Consider having patrons pre-sign up for kits so that you have enough on hand. First come, first served can be very frustrating when you go to great lengths to go out during a pandemic and then you go away empty handed. You could use something as simple as a Google form to help facilitate sign ups for kits to make sure that everyone that comes to pick up a kit leaves with a kit.

Whenever possible, consider making detailed step by step instructions – including pictures – or make a video tutorial and share the information where that tutorial can be found in with your kits, especially if they are more difficult crafts.

Though many libraries have circulating maker kits, because of the nature of the pandemic you’ll want to consider kits in which no items are returned for health and safety reasons. It’s true that you could probably clean and disinfect things like safety scissors, but you’ll also probably lose a fair number if you send them out in kits with the expectation that they will be returned. Plus, is cleaning and sanitizing safety scissors the best use of our time in this particular scenario when you consider how deadly the virus can be for some?

Create a hashtag for your library system, your kits, or specific projects and invite your patrons to share their completed projects with you when they are done so you can get some built in social media and PR. It’s voluntary, of course, but if you’re making kits you might as well invite your patrons to share their completed projects with you.

You’ll want to look for crafts that are easy, creative, inexpensive and require as few supplies as possible, but are still fun and have a visual punch. Kits can be put into something simple like a ziploc or paper bag. Be sure to include some type of branding on your craft kits.

Make and Take Craft Kit Resources

Pinterest Board of Make and Take Craft Kits: https://www.pinterest.com/PosiePea/library-make-take/