Subscribe to SLJ
Teen Librarian Toolbox
Inside Teen Librarian Toolbox

Book Review: Sparrow by Sarah Moon

Publisher’s description

ra6Sparrow has always had a difficult time making friends. She would always rather have stayed home on the weekends with her mother, an affluent IT Executive at a Manhattan bank, reading, or watching the birds, than playing with other kids. And that’s made school a lonely experience for her. It’s made LIFE a lonely experience.

But when the one teacher who really understood her — Mrs. Wexler, the school librarian, a woman who let her eat her lunch in the library office rather than hide in a bathroom stall, a woman who shared her passion for novels and knew just the ones she’d love — is killed in a freak car accident, Sparrow’s world unravels and she’s found on the roof of her school in an apparent suicide attempt.

With the help of an insightful therapist, Sparrow finally reveals the truth of her inner life. And it’s here that she discovers an outlet in Rock & Roll music…

 

Amanda’s thoughts

sparrowA middle grade book that deals with mental health? YES, please.

14-year-old Brooklyn 8th grader Sparrow has debilitating social anxiety. She has always dealt with her fear and shyness by flying away—not literally, of course, but pretty close. She pictures herself off with the birds, away from everything on land that makes her uncomfortable. When she’s found on the school roof during one of her flying episodes, everyone assumes it’s a suicide attempt and won’t hear otherwise. Sparrow begins therapy with Dr. Katz. At first, she’s reluctant to open up, worried Dr. Katz will think she’s crazy. It doesn’t help that her mother isn’t thrilled that she’s in therapy and thinks of it as White Girl Stuff (Sparrow and her mother are black). But slowly, Sparrow begins to talk to Dr. Katz, admitting to herself and her mother how much good the therapy is doing. School is still hard for her, especially because her beloved favorite teacher, Mrs. Wexler, the librarian, died earlier in the year. Sparrow had spent every lunch since 5th grade in the library, finding solace in both the library and Mrs. Wexler. Everything since her death has been harder. But therapy is helping, as is her new (and intense) interest in music. Dr. Katz introduces her to older punk and indie music (think Pixies, Sonic Youth, Patti Smith), and Sparrow revels in the connective and redemptive power of music. Dr. Katz pushes Sparrow to learn how to deal with all of the things that make her want to fly away, but it’s really through a month-long girls’ rock music camp that Sparrow begins to find her voice and overcome her fears.

 

This is a fantastic book for older middle grade readers. Sparrow, though silent through much of school, is such a profoundly real character. Readers get to know her well far sooner than her peers get to know her. She’s funny and bitingly clever. Her passion for books and music will send readers seeking out the bands they’ve maybe never heard of or delighting in seeing their favorite titles or songs as part of the story. Dr. Katz, Mrs. Wexler, and Mrs. Smith, the English teacher, are wonderfully supportive, compassionate adults who see Sparrow for who she is. Though her mother is wary of therapy and Dr. Katz, she loves Sparrow and wants the best for her. She may not totally understand what her daughter is going through or how to best help her, but she’s open to doing whatever seems right for Sparrow and desperately wants to be a part of Sparrow’s very private inner life. Well-written, emotionally powerful, and packed with stand-out characters, this middle grade title is a must for every library. A welcome addition to the small field of middle grade books that address mental health. 

 

Review copy courtesy of the publisher

ISBN-13: 9781338032581
Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date: 10/10/2017

Book Review: Kaleidoscope Song by Fox Benwell

Publisher’s description

ra6Fox Benwell delivers a harrowing and beautifully written novel that explores the relationship between two girls obsessed with music, the practice of corrective rape, and the risks and power of using your voice.

Neo loves music, and all she ever wanted was a life sharing this passion, on the radio. When she meets Tale, the lead singer in a local South African band, their shared love of music grows. So does their love for each other. But not everyone approves. Then Neo lands her dream job of working at a popular radio station, and she discovers that using your voice is sometimes harder than expected, and there are always consequences.

 

Amanda’s thoughts

foxHere is all I knew about this book going in: I like Fox. I like this cover. I know this book, at some point, deals with corrective rape. 

Neo lives in Khayelitsha, South Africa. She’s best friends with Janet, absolutely bonkers in love with music, and dreams of hosting her own radio program. When she goes to see Umzi Radio live at a local bar, she develops an enormous crush on Tale, the singer of one of the bands that night. She knows being in love with another girl is not something her family (or friends or community) will accept, but that doesn’t stop Neo and Tale from embarking on a lovely, passionate, and semi-secret relationship. Tale’s bandmates instantly become Neo’s friends, too, and for the first time in her life, Neo feels a real sense of acceptance and community. She starts to see a bigger world than she knew was possible for her. At one point she thinks, “There is so much more to life than school and work and dirty laundry. And I want it all.” She begins sneaking out to meet up with Tale. Her mother eventually installs a padlock on the door to try to stop her from going out (and working under the assumption that she is going out to hear music and meet up with a boy). As far as her parents are concerned, Neo’s life should be about school, grades, and good behavior. Loving music and dreaming of a life in radio is a waste of time. Her father works at the security desk  at the radio station and takes Neo along to try to prove some kind of point about the reality of working there. It backfires when Mr. Sid, the station owner, lets Neo have an unpaid internship there that eventually involves her having her own show. Though she’s had a falling out with Janet and her grades are rather terrible, everything else seems to be looking up for Neo. She’s blissfully happy with Tale, even if they can only hook up in the shadows and must hide their love. She’s terrified of being found out, but when she learns about Pride, she desperately wants to take part in the protest and celebration of the event. But her increasing boldness and determination to live her life in the open, and her message on the radio about being proud to sing your own song and loving who you love, land her in more trouble than she could have imagined. What follows is devastating, brutal, and heartbreaking.

This is a powerful, harrowing look at the desire to live an authentic life and the many ways taking that risk may be judged and punished. I am always banging on about wanting new stories, and I think this is the first YA story I’ve read that deals with corrective rape… and, I think, also the first YA book I’ve read set in South Africa (I feel like that can’t possibly be true, but I’m coming up with nothing). I felt like I was holding my breath this entire book. Benwell includes an author’s note addressing his privilege as a white Brit—how some elements of the story overlap with things from his own life and from the lives of those around him, but this is not his story. LGBTQIA+ resources are appended, too. Well-written and deeply affecting. Give this to readers who will be able to look past the bleakness and brutality to see the love and joy at the heart of the story. 

 

Review copy courtesy of the publisher and Edelweiss

ISBN-13: 9781481477673

Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers

Publication date: 09/19/2017

 

Book Review: Boy Seeking Band by Steve Brezenoff

Publisher’s description

ra6Great music and great friendships aren’t always in harmony. Terence Kato is a prodigy bass player, but he’s determined to finish middle school on a high note. Life has other plans. In eighth grade, he’s forced to transfer from a private arts school to a public school, where the kids seemingly speak a different language. Luckily, Terence knows a universal one: music. The teen sets out to build a rock band and, in the process, make a few friends. From the acclaimed author of Brooklyn, Burning and Guy in Real Life comes a fresh, funny, genuine novel about enjoying life beyond the opening act.

 

Amanda’s thoughts

boy seeking bandThere’s a lot to like about this book, but the major thing that stands out to me is this: this is a great book for reluctant/struggling readers who want something that looks/feels “older” than they might normally read. While this is about 8th graders, and could easily be a YA title with not much tweaking, kids 10 and up could comfortably read this book. The cover, plot, and deeper issues the story touches on all make this appealing for both fans of middle grade and fans of younger YA.

 

Minneapolis teen Terence has spent a few years attending an arts school, but now is at Franklin Middle School, a public school, after his mom died and he and his father moved across town. There’s no money anymore for the private school tuition and Terence’s dad is in rough shape, debilitated by grief and, understandably, not doing the greatest job parenting or helping Terence grieve or adjust to his new school. Terence, who plays bass, joins the school jazz band, but they’re not up to his standards, so he bails, searching instead to form his own band. Terence is just a bit of a music snob, something that really comes to light as he auditions people for his band. Before long he’s joined by other musicians, and while they sound great and really seem to click, Terence repeatedly makes it clear that this is just a band—he’s not looking for friends at Franklin. Like, he actually, repeatedly says out loud that he does not want friends. Sure, buddy. Whatever you say. It’s clear that Terence is struggling to work through his mother’s death and all the changes that came after, but he absolutely does not want to talk about it with his new friends (sorry, bandmates) to the point that he freaks out on them if they begin to show the tiniest bit of compassion to him.  In fact, things with the band fall apart, thanks to Terence, just when the Wellstone Music Battle of the Kid Bands is coming up. Terence’s band is being buzzed about at school and they seem like real contenders for the battle, but Terence’s anger and grief, and insistence on going it alone, may get in the way of their potential success. 

 

Brezenoff excels in creating interesting characters. Though Terence holds everyone at a distance, including the reader, the depth of his complicated feelings is clear. He’s surrounded by other people who show there is more to them than what they seem. BOY SEEKING BAND is a well-written look at the ways grief can change a life. Packed with music references, this will appeal to a wide range of readers, but especially to anyone who loves music as much as Terence does. A great addition for both middle grade and young adult collections. 

 

Review copy courtesy of the publisher and NetGalley

ISBN-13: 9781496544629

Publisher: Capstone Press

Publication date: 08/28/2017

Book Review: Who’s That Girl by Blair Thornburgh

 Publisher’s description

tltbutton6This laugh-out-loud debut is filled with hilarious awkward encounters, a supportive LGBTQ organization, and too many cheesy lyrics to count—all with the compulsive readability of Audrey, Wait! and Boy Meets Boy.

Junior Nattie McCullough has always been that under-the-radar straight girl who hangs out in the cafeteria with her gay-straight alliance friends. She’s never been the girl that gets the guy, let alone the girl that gets a hit song named after her.

But when last summer’s crush, smoking-hot musician Sebastian Delacroix—who has recently hit the mainstream big-time—returns home to play a local show, that’s just what she gets. He and his band, the Young Lungs, have written a chart-topping single—“Natalie”—which instantly makes Nattie second guess everything she thought about their awkward non-kiss at that June pool party. That it was horrific. That it meant nothing. That Sebastian never gave her another thought.

To help keep her mind off of Sebastian and his maybe-about-her, maybe-not-about-her song, Nattie throws herself into planning the school’s LGBTQIA dance. That proves problematic, too, when Nattie begins to develop feelings for her good friend Zach. With the song getting major airplay and her once-normal life starting to resemble the cover of a gossip magazine, Nattie is determined to figure out once and for all if her brief moment with Sebastian was the stuff love songs are made of—or just a one-hit wonder.

 

Amanda’s thoughts

whos that girl

The publisher’s description up there gives a pretty thorough summary of the plot, but doesn’t really at all capture how utterly charming and compulsively readable this story is. Nattie and her friends are awesome. Her parents are great. The romantic tension (and denial/ignorance of romantic feelings) is pitch perfect. Nattie makes mistakes and bad choices and is unable to see things that appear totally obvious to the reader, but I mean those things in all the best ways; I say those things to mean that she is such a real character, flawed in realistic ways, learning and making realizations just like we all do. Adult me reads about Sebastian and rolls her eyes and thinks, girl, don’t waste time having a crush on him. But teen me is always around, and she’s like, but he wrote a song about her! Eek!

 

Thornburgh writes great dialogue and memorable characters. There’s great humor, banter, and clever little quips. And while this story is about romance, or the potential for romance, sure, it’s really about friendship. This review is short not because I didn’t like the book–I loved it–but because you just need to go read it and discover the excellence for yourself. Pretty much a perfect read, super satisfying and completely absorbing. 

 

Review copy courtesy of the publisher and Edelweiss

ISBN-13: 9780062447777

Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers

Publication date: 07/11/2017

Book Review: How to Make a Wish by Ashley Herring Blake

Publisher’s description

how-to-makeGrace, tough and wise, has nearly given up on wishes, thanks to a childhood spent with her unpredictable, larger-than-life mother. But this summer, Grace meets Eva, a girl who believes in dreams, despite her own difficult circumstances.

 

One fateful evening, Eva climbs through a window in Grace’s room, setting off a chain of stolen nights on the beach. When Eva tells Grace that she likes girls, Grace’s world opens up and she begins to believe in happiness again.

 

How to Make a Wish is an emotionally charged portrait of a mother and daughter’s relationship and a heartfelt story about two girls who find each other at the exact right time.

 

 

Amanda’s thoughts

I read this book in one sitting. I used to do that a lot—read books in one chunk of time—but don’t so much anymore. While I do typically read a book in one to two days, the time is broken up—I need to write something, I need to run errands, I need to parent, I need to do whatever. My busy brain isn’t the biggest fan of letting me settle into any one thing for too long. But with this book, I was hooked from page one and had no interest in moving until I was done reading. I am not a person who says “all the feels.” I do not tend to feel “swoony” over books. As a fairly cynical, scowly person, those kinds of expressions are just not me. BUT. I kept thinking of both expressions as I read. And when I was done, I shut the book and just held onto it, thinking, well, that was a completely satisfying read. And, really, how often do we read books that just feel completely, absolutely, perfectly satisfying?

 

Grace returns to Maine from a two-week piano workshop in Boston to find that her mother, Maggie, has, once again, moved them in with her newest boyfriend, Pete. Never mind that they’ve barely been dating for a minute. Never mind that Pete’s son, Jay, is Grace’s ex (and that he posted all of their sexts after they broke up). Maggie is always doing this—flitting from guy to guy, being impulsive, not thinking of how things might affect Grace, not doing her job as a parent. She’s basically an overgrown kid (with a drinking problem) and Grace is left to do the parenting. But there’s maybe only one more year of this life. At the end of the summer, Grace will be auditioning for the Manhattan School of Music. College will mean a fresh start for Grace—something that she needs—and not in the way her mother is always giving them new starts. But as much as Grace cannot wait to get away from her life, she’s worried about leaving her mother behind. Who will watch over Maggie?

 

Summer on the cape should mean more of the same—hanging with her best friend, Luca, and suffering through her mother’s unpredictable whims—but becomes much more interesting when Eva arrives. Eva is the daughter of one of Luca’s mother’s friends who recently passed away. Emmy, Luca’s mom, is now her guardian. Eva and Grace meet on the beach, where both have gone to process their emotions, and immediately click. Eventually, after Eva tells Grace that she is a lesbian and Grace tells Eva she’s bisexual, their friendship turns into something more. But it quickly becomes complicated by, what else, Grace’s mother. Maggie wants to nurture Eva and becomes buddies with her, something Grace would rather not see happening. Eva doesn’t understand the full story of just how Maggie can be and Maggie doesn’t know that Grace and Eva are dating (oblivious to anything that isn’t her own life, Grace did at one point try to tell Maggie she was bisexual, but Maggie chose to brush that admission off and not understand it). It’s clearly a recipe for disaster. When Maggie eventually makes a(nother) really bad choice—one that affects her, Grace, and Eva—Grace reaches her breaking point and has to decide who she really needs to be taking care of.

 

Blake’s characters are vibrant and multifaceted. Though so much of this book is about pain, loss, and grief, there is also just so much love in this story. Compassion comes from the places we would expect (Emmy, Luca) and from surprising places, too (Jay, Pete). Both Grace and Eva are fragile but resilient. They both find family in new ways—ways neither would have chosen (a dead mom, an irresponsible and alcoholic mom)—and find support and care and love there. And their relationship, though not always easy, is meaningful and achingly lovely. I do not generally want characters who date in YA books to stay together forever (see my earlier remark about being cynical and scowly). But I love Grace and Eva together. This is an easy recommendation for fans of contemporary stories. Again, it’s rare that I find something just completely satisfying, and this book felt perfect in every way. Go read it!

 

Review copy courtesy of the publisher

ISBN-13: 9780544815193

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Publication date: 05/02/2017

Book Review: The Bad Decisions Playlist by Michael Rubens

Publisher’s description

badSixteen-year-old Austin is always messing up and then joking his way out of tough spots. The sudden appearance of his allegedly dead father, who happens to be the very-much-alive rock star Shane Tyler, stops him cold. Austin—a talented musician himself—is sucked into his newfound father’s alluring music-biz orbit, pulling his true love, Josephine, along with him. None of Austin’s previous bad decisions, resulting in broken instruments, broken hearts, and broken dreams, can top this one. Witty, audacious, and taking adolescence to the max, Austin is dragged kicking and screaming toward adulthood in this hilarious, heart-wrenching YA novel.

 

 

Amanda’s thoughts

I gravitated to this because I loved the cover. Then I read the summary and knew I wouldn’t want to overlook this title. As an aging punk whose whole entire teenage life revolved around music—and falling hard for musician boys who made questionable choices—this novel spoke to me (though, once again, it was jarring for me to relate to the teenage characters but realize I’m older than both of the parents in this book—an all-too-common occurrence these days).

 

Set just outside of Minneapolis in Edina, 16-year-old Austin lives with his mother, who works in a nail salon. Her stodgy boyfriend Rick (who Austin at one point refers to as “the world’s least interesting man”) is often around, but Austin tries to just steer clear of him. Austin’s mom told him his dad died before he was born… but as the blurb up there tells you, that’s not true. Austin is a great character. He’s funny and self-deprecating with a history of doing stupid stuff to entertain girls. He’s a talented musician with grand dreams of moving to NYC after high school to become a famous singer-songwriter. But his friend Devon calls him Half-Song because Austin can never finish writing anything. He also is terrified of performing in front of people. He’s supposed to be spending the summer focusing on attending summer school, getting math tutoring, and working to not be sent to military school. Instead, he falls hard for his tutor, Josephine, gets in epic fights with his mother, becomes friends and bandmates with his bully, meets his not-dead (and very famous) father, and finally gets on the stage in front of people.

 

Part of the real joy of this book was seeing how events unfolded, so I won’t tell you too many plot details. The story wasn’t predictable—or when it was, I was roped in enough to believe it wouldn’t take that turn or play out that way. Austin is a great character who experiences a lot of wonderful things in this story (when he’s not busy falling down hills and nearly being killed by a lawnmower, or breaking expensive instruments, or getting in trouble for stealing a car) and even though I KNOW he makes bad decisions, and that people in his life make bad decisions, I thought maybe they’d turn it around. His relationship with Josephine is fantastic. She’s smart, funny, and his total opposite, but they connect through music and when she’s able to see past Austin’s reputation. She’s in his life at just the right moment, as he grapples with the reality of his father and is able to be as involved in making music as he’s always wanted to be. Austin’s journey isn’t an easy one to observe. I spent a fair amount of time wincing and lecturing him in my head. The ending of the book isn’t tidy or necessarily completely happy, but it is satisfying. You know me—I’ll take a realistic ending over a “happy” ending any time. A fun, smart, at times heartbreaking read about families, love, choices, consequences, and the power of music. 

 

 

Review copy courtesy of the publisher and Edelweiss

ISBN-13: 9780544096677

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Publication date:08/02/2016

Book Review: This Song Is (Not) For You by Laura Nowlin

Publisher’s description

this songRamona fell for Sam the moment she met him. It was like she had known him forever. He’s one of the few constants in her life, and their friendship is just too important to risk for a kiss. Though she really wants to kiss him…

Sam loves Ramona, but he would never expect her to feel the same way-she’s too quirky and cool for someone like him. Still, they complement each other perfectly, both as best friends and as a band.

Then they meet Tom. Tom makes music too, and he’s the band’s missing piece. The three quickly become inseparable. Except Ramona’s falling in love with Tom. But she hasn’t fallen out of love with Sam either. How can she be true to her feelings without breaking up the band?

 

Amanda’s thoughts

 

Let’s put this right here in the front, just in case you plan to skim this review: THIS BOOK FEATURES AN ASEXUAL MAIN CHARACTER WHO TALKS A LOT ABOUT BEING ASEXUAL.

 

We’ll get back to that later.

 

I burned through this book in about 90 minutes. It’s on the short side and a quick read. The three main characters, Sam, Tom, and Ramona, take turns narrating. Unlike MANY books with alternate narration, their voices are distinctive and it eventually becomes VERY important to be able to see the story from each of their points of view. Sam and Ramona go to a prep school where they don’t really fit in (nor would they want to). They stick together and spend a lot of time practicing with their band (which is just the two of them), April and the Rain. They intend to go to Artibus College of Music and Arts together after graduation. At their audition, they meet Tom, a senior from another area school. Ramona instantly decides that he should be in their band. Tom’s a little overwhelmed by Ramona’s nonstop enthusiasm, but he feels drawn to Ramona and Sam, so joins their band. They changed their name to Vandalized by Glitter and make lovely, weird music together.

 

SKIP RIGHT OVER THIS NEXT PARAGRAPH IF YOU DON’T WANT SPOILERS, OKAY? 

 

Ramona has been in love with Sam basically since the second they met. She doesn’t see any signs that he could maybe feel the same way, and she doesn’t want to ruin their friendship, so she keeps this fact to herself. The thing is, Sam is desperately in love with Ramona, too, and figures the same thing—he’d know by now if she reciprocated those feelings. As an adult, I read this and think, ack! Just tell each other how you feel. But the teenage part of me that lives just under the surface still remembers EXACTLY how they feel and what they’re going through. Enter Tom. Ramona gets a big ol’ crush on him right away. They start to date (seriously, more on this below). She realizes she truly loves both and wants to be with both. Sam and Tom both come to these kinds of revelations too—why can’t they all be together? It’s far more complicated than those two quick sentences, of course, but you can go read all about it yourself. My point is, yes, this is a story with a love triangle, but it’s about a triangle that chooses to stay a triangle.

 

YOU CAN COME BACK NOW—NO MORE SPOILERS.

 

Ramona’s crush on Tom is instant, and he eventually realizes he’s into her as well. Tom recounts (to the reader) what went on in his last relationship with a girl named Sara. Sara talked to him about how he doesn’t want to have sex with her, how he seems bored kissing her and never tries anything else. She wonders if he’s gay. “I’m not gay,” Tom tells her. “I just don’t feel that way about anybody.” He tells her he doesn’t care about sex. Sara doesn’t believe him. She doesn’t think this is possible. So he’s a little hesitant to get involved with Ramona, given what happened before. They get together, and Tom is really into Ramona romantically but not sexually. They kiss and it’s just meh to Tom. YOU GUYS, there is so much about being asexual in this book. Tom really lets us into his brain. He tells the reader all of the things and people he loves and that he doesn’t feel like he’s missing out on anything by not having sexual desires. He knows nothing is WRONG with him, but he still grapples with this a little, thinking maybe he should try harder to be into making out etc with Ramona. Eventually, he tells Ramona he’s asexual. And lots of stuff ensues after this (I’m really trying hard to not tell you the whole plot here. I’m not doing a great job of that, am I?), all of it good and positive and loving and accepting.

 

Other things about this book: Sam lives in the rich area of St. Louis. Tom lives in Ferguson. Their families are all different—Ramona’s mom is dead, Sam’s dad took off, and Tom’s parents are older. All three main characters are super duper giant music nerds. Tom is into cool public art projects, like Glitter in Odd Places. They all have secrets. We get to see tiny bits of their home lives and their school lives in relation to other students. The book is funny, too. Sam tells us about Ramona sleeping in the car: “Her mouth was hanging open, and she was frowning like she was dreaming of something that pisses her off, like dubstep.” 

 

This book was a total joy to read. Initially I found Ramona kind of insufferable, but her constant enthusiasm grew on me. I loved how into music they were, I loved their relationships with one another, and I loved getting to see the story through all of their eyes. Nowlin really captured what to me is a distinctly teenage feeling of being instantly completely obsessed with someone, finding everything they do fascinating, and then being confused on what to do next. This book should be in all collections. It’s not often we see an asexual character in YA or see romantic relationships handled the way they are here. A wonderful, quick, unique read. 

 

Review copy courtesy of the publisher

ISBN-13: 9781492602903

Publisher: Sourcebooks

Publication date: 01/05/2016

We Call Upon the Author: A Literary Playlist

As a lifelong reader and writer, I’ve always had a special interest in songs that talk about reading, writing, writers, or books. I’ve compiled 20 of my favorite songs about these topics for your listening enjoyment. I’m also linking to other blogs and articles that compile their own lists. There are A LOT of songs out there about these subjects. My musical taste leans heavily toward all things punk, alt, and indie (as you probably know by now), and my list here reflects that. Do you have favorite songs about writing and reading? Share them with us in the comments or tag us on Twitter (I’m @CiteSomething). 

 

We Call Upon the Author: A Literary Playlist

 

“When I Write my Master’s Thesis” by John K. Samson

 

“Who Wrote Holden Caulfield?” by Green Day

 

“High School Poetry” by 764-HERO

 

“I Typed for Miles” by Jets to Brazil

 

“Impossible Things” by Looper

 

“Wrapped up in Books” by Belle and Sebastian

 

“Read it in Books” by Echo and the Bunnymen

 

“Open Book” by Cake

 

“We Call Upon the Author” by Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds

 

“I Should Be Allowed to Think” by They Might Be Giants

 

“Everyday I Write the Book” by Elvis Costello

 

“Oxford Comma” by Vampire Weekend

 

“The Engine Driver” by The Decemberists

 

“Party for the Fight to Write” by Atmosphere

 

“Romeo and Juliet” by the Indigo Girls

 

“Cemetery Gates” by The Smiths

 

“You Speak My Language” by Morphine

 

“Words” by Low

 

“All My Little Words” by The Magnetic Fields

 

“The Book of Love” by The Magnetic Fields

 

 

 Other literary playlists:

“25 Songs That Reference Books” at ShortList.com 

“Songs Inspired by Books” at Songfacts

 “11 Songs Inspired by Literature” at Mental Floss

 “25 Very Literary Songs” at Entropy Mag

“The 11 Best Metal Songs About Literature” at Electric Lit 

“10 of Music’s Most Literature-Obsessed Songwriters” at Flavorwire 

“22 Rock Songs Inspired by Batman, Spidey, and Other Comics Heroes” at Blastr 

Teenage Anthems: The Soundtrack to TLT’s Teen Years

We’ve got a music theme going on this week at TLT, so we decided to collaborate on a playlist to share with you. We each chose five songs that were important to us as teenagers. I won’t tell you how long I agonized over this. Only five?! Though I would have agonized even if I were sharing 50 songs that were important to me as a teenager. Enjoy our picks and share your teenage anthems with us, too! Tag us on Twitter (@TLT16), use the hashtag #teenageanthems, or leave a comment on this post!

 

The TLT Teenage Anthems Playlist

Karen’s picks:

People are People by Depeche Mode

This album and Songs from the Big Chair by Tears for Fears were the first albums I ever bought. I saved up my babysitting money, went to the mall and pulled them both off the shelf without hesitation because I was waiting hardcore to buy them. By the way, they’re still great albums.

 

Add it Up by the Violent Femmes

The Violent Femmes were totally cool, all my friends loved them an adults hated them. What more can you ask for in life. Plus, it’s fun to sing along really loud to with all your friends. See also, Kiss Off and Blister in the Sun.

 

Every Rose Has Its Thorn by Poison

My best friend and I were united by our love of Duran Duran, but she was also very much into hair metal bands. She loved this song hardcore. She died our junior year in a car accident and I can’t even listen to this song without thinking of her.

 

I Don’t Want Your Love by Duran Duran

Duran Duran had way bigger hits, but it was while they were touring for the Notorious album during my Sophomore year that I finally got to see them in concern at Six Flags Over Texas. And on a school night. I may or may not have hyperventilated after it was over causing my best friend to slap me in the face. And we may or may not have gotten in trouble for not meeting our parents out front at the reasonable hour we were supposed to. But man, what an amazing moment in my life.

 

Wuthering Heights by Kate Bush

Kate Bush is an amazing artist that not enough people seem to know about. They played her song Running Up That Hill a lot on MtV when I was in Jr. High, when MtV still played a lot of videos and you could find tons of cool music. The day I graduated high school I took the money I got as gifts, it wasn’t much, and bought the complete works of Edgar Allan Poe and The Sensual World album by Kate Bush. Fantastic album.

 

Heather’s picks:

 

Fall On Me by REM

The first album I bought was Out of Time and I very quickly tried to acquire all of the REM I could. This one is my favorite ever. I think it’s REM at their best: each part both stands out and blends perfectly with the others.

 

Suzanne by Leonard Cohen

I discovered Leonard Cohen in the library, after first hearing his name in Nirvana’s Pennyroyal Tea. I loved how quiet and beautiful and dark this album was, and the pacing in Suzanne was almost hypnotic. And what geeky, quiet girl wouldn’t get sucked up by a line like “she’s touched your perfect body with her mind”?

http://youtu.be/otJY2HvW3Bw

 

To Bring You My Love by PJ Harvey

My friend Dan never drank, but he got a fake ID in high school so he could get into shows. I was never that daring, so he just brought me CDs to listen to. PJ Harvey was scary and alluring and had a voice and power like no other woman I’d heard.

 

Sometimes by James

It’s such a vivid picture and I loved the refrain. I remember trying to write down all of the lyrics, because they weren’t in the liner notes and this was pre-home internet for me. Play- scribble – pause – scribble – play – scribble, etc. My friends and I were so excited about the release of this album (Laid), we’d tease each other “I got laid this weekend – did you get laid yet?” It was all so mature.

 

Say it Ain’t So by Weezer

This was our driving around aimlessly album. We’d play air guitar to this one and scream the lyrics out the window.

 

Amanda’s picks:

 

The First Part by Superchunk

Superchunk albums were in constant rotation throughout my teen years. I always loved the line “one good minute could last me a whole year.” It spoke to the melodramatic (and secretly hopeful, under all my cynicism) part of me.

 

Punk Rock Girl by The Dead Milkmen

When I was 17, my not-quite-yet boyfriend showed up at my house late one night, set up his band in my driveway, and proceeded to play “Punk Rock Girl.” I’d been in my room listening to Beautiful Music for Ugly Children and working on a zine (I actually specifically remember this moment in time, but it’s safe to say that at any given point on a late night in my teen years I was listening to music and making a zine). I sat out by my front door, both amazed and kind of mortified this was happening (late night appearance of a band playing in my quiet neighborhood drew attention). That relationship, like so many high school relationships, eventually imploded in a pretty spectacular way, but 20 years removed from that night, I still think it was pretty fantastic.

 

Chesterfield King by Jawbreaker

“We stood in your room and laughed out loud.
Suddenly the laughter died
and we were caught in an eye to eye.
We sat on the floor and did we sit close.
I could smell your thoughts and thought.
Do you want to touch a lot like me?”

Still some of my very favorite lyrics ever. Conjures up memories of rainy Minneapolis nights, hooded sweatshirts with patches, and the thrill of not really knowing what would happen next.

 

Going to Pasalacqua by Green Day

Green Day was the first band I saw at First Ave in Minneapolis (October 10, 1993. I still have the ticket stub).  Their first two albums are seared into my brain, and this song, all about infatuation, made it onto nearly every mix tape I ever made.

 

Showdown by Propagandhi

It’s possible I’ve seen Propagandhi live more than any other band. Maybe they’re tied with Built to Spill, or Ani Difranco, or Low. At any rate, I saw them a lot. This band was my everything. I loved to scream along to their angry, political, swear word-laden songs. They were good to dance to, to jump around to, to be angry to, to blast out the car windows coming back from shows late at night. I still know every single word of their How To Clean Everything album.  When I need to get the cobwebs out of my brain, I still put this album on. Teenage Me would be happy with that.

 

Robin’s picks:

Music from my teen years is kind of a weird topic. I grew up in Lynchburg, VA (home of Jerry Falwell’s Thomas Road Baptist Church and Liberty University.) There were very few radio stations that didn’t play Christian, Country, or Christian Country music. We had 1 top 40 station. It played a lot of Madonna and Duran Duran. That said, at some point MTV came on the air, and I was exposed to a slightly more varied set of artists. So here are 5 songs that will always remind me of my teen years:

 

Take on Me by a-ha

 

Bust a Move by Young MC

 

Pulling Mussels (from the Shell) by Squeeze

 

Don’t You (Forget About Me) by Simple Minds

 

Tainted Love by Soft Cell

 

 

 

Take 5: You Spin Me Right Round, Baby: YA Books About Records

Record Store Day is Saturday, April 18.  As a music fanatic, I think this is a day worth celebrating.

 

From their website: “Record Store Day was conceived in 2007 at a gathering of independent record store owners and employees as a way to celebrate and spread the word about the unique culture surrounding nearly 1400 independently owned record stores in the US and thousands of similar stores internationally. There are Record Store Day participating stores on every continent except Antarctica.”

 

This year’s ambassador for Record Store Day is Dave Grohl. On the website, he writes, “Every weekend I couldn’t wait to take my hard earned lawn mowing cash down for an afternoon full of discovery. And, the chase was always as good as the catch! I spent hours flipping through every stack, examining the artwork on every cover, the titles and credits, searching for music that would inspire me, or understand me, or just to help me escape. These places became my churches, my libraries, my schools. They felt like home. And, I don’t know where I would be today without them.”

 

I spent a HUGE part of my teen years hanging out at Ernie November Records in Mankato, Minnesota. Other than going to shows and buying books, most of my babysitting money went to buying albums at Ernie’s. Some of my other favorite record store haunts as a teen were Extreme Noise in Minneapolis and Oar Folkjokeopus in Minneapolis. Lots of great music and zines purchased at all of those shops over the years.

 

To help celebrate Record Store Day, set up a display of YA books about record stores and musicians. Here are a few to get you started. These books take place in record stores, star DJs, and show what happens when you’re the subject of a hit song. Summaries via the publisher.

 

Take 5: You Spin Me Right Round, Baby: YA Books About Records

 

The Vinyl Princess by Yvonne Prinz

ISBN-13: 9780061715839

Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers

Publication date: 12/22/2009

Summary:

Summer is here, and 16-year-old Allie, a self-professed music geek, is exactly where she wants to be: working full-time at Berkeley’s ultra-cool Bob and Bob Records. There, Allie can spend her days bantering with the street people, talking the talk with the staff, shepherding the uncool bridge-and-tunnel shoppers, all the while blissfully surrounded by music, music, music. It’s the perfect setup for her to develop her secret identity as The Vinyl Princess, author of both a brand-new zine and blog. From the safety of her favourite place on earth, Allie is poised to have it all: love, music and blogging.
Her mother, though, is actually the one getting the dates, and business at Allie’s beloved record store is becoming dangerously slow—not to mention that there have been a string of robberies in the neighbourhood. At least her blog seems to be gaining interest, one vinyl junkie at a time….

 

Beautiful Music for Ugly Children by Kirstin Cronn-Mills 

ISBN-13: 9780738732510

Publisher: Llewellyn Worldwide, Ltd.

Publication date: 10/8/2012

Read my review here

Summary:

“This is Beautiful Music for Ugly Children, on community radio 90.3, KZUK. I’m Gabe. Welcome to my show.”

My birth name is Elizabeth, but I’m a guy. Gabe. My parents think I’ve gone crazy and the rest of the world is happy to agree with them, but I know I’m right. I’ve been a boy my whole life.

When you think about it, I’m like a record. Elizabeth is my A side, the song everybody knows, and Gabe is my B side—not heard as often, but just as good.

It’s time to let my B side play.

Winner of the 2014 Stonewall Book Award for Children’s and Young Adult Literature.

 

Girl Defective by Simmone Howell

ISBN-13: 9781442497603

Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers

Publication date: 9/2/2014

Read my review here

Summary:

This is the story of a wild girl and a ghost girl; a boy who knew nothing and a boy who thought he knew everything.

It’s a story about Skylark Martin, who lives with her father and brother in a vintage record shop and is trying to find her place in the world. It’s about ten-year-old Super Agent Gully and his case of a lifetime. And about beautiful, reckless, sharp-as-knives Nancy. It’s about tragi-hot Luke, and just-plain-tragic Mia Casey. It’s about the dark underbelly of a curious neighborhood. It’s about summer, and weirdness, and mystery, and music.

And it’s about life and death and grief and romance. All the good stuff.

 

Audrey, Wait! by Robin Benway 

ISBN-13: 9781595141927

Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group

Publication date: 4/2/2009

Summary:

When funny, charming, absolutely-normal Audrey Cuttler dumps her boyfriend Evan, he writes a song about her that becomes a number-one hit-and rockets Audrey to stardom!

Suddenly, tabloid paparazzi are on her tail and Audrey can barely hang with her friends at concerts or the movies without getting mobbed-let alone score a date with James, her adorable coworker at the Scooper Dooper. Her life will never be the same-at least, not until Audrey confronts Evan live on MTV and lets the world know exactly who she is!

 

DJ Rising by Love Maia

ISBN-13: 9780316121897

Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

Publication date: 2/12/2013

Summary:

The first thing I hear is music. The first thing I’ve always heard is music.

Meet Marley, an unassuming high school junior who breathes in music like oxygen. In between caring for his heroin-addicted mother, and keeping his scholarship at a fancy prep school, he dreams of becoming a professional DJ.

When chance lands Marley his first real DJ job, his career as “DJ Ice” suddenly skyrockets. But when heart-rending disaster at home brings Marley crashing back down to earth, he is torn between obligation and following his dreams.

 

If you would like to recommend additional titles on this topic, please leave us a comment. We always look forward to hearing what books others value and recommend.