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What a strange time to be a woman, a guest post by Bree Barton

tltheader

Author Bree Barton, whose book, HEART OF THORNS, is out today, joins us to talk about freedoms, feminism, power, and stories. Hop on over to this link to see Amanda’s review of Bree’s new book. 

 

 

In some ways, we have never enjoyed more freedom. As I write this post, I am sitting in a café drinking crimsonberry tea and wearing short shorts—an outfit that would have seen my grandmother shunned by “polite society.” I went to a good school and got a good job. At thirty-three, I don’t have kids, and no one is pressuring me to. Last year I saved up money and took myself to Iceland for ten days on a book research trip. I never once felt unsafe.

 

In other ways, we are stripped of our freedoms every day.

 

I’ve always been interested in what it means to have a body, especially as a woman. What brings us pleasure? What brings us pain? Who has control over our bodies? I wish the answer to the last question were unequivocally “ourselves,” but we know that isn’t true. Controlling someone else’s body is about power, and historically, that power has belonged to men. The church. The government. Husbands. Doctors. And, most recently: the Supreme Court.

 

But to be perfectly honest, those questions were not at the forefront of my mind three years ago, when I started writing my debut fantasy novel.

 

We’d had a good few years. I canvassed for Obama in 2008, riding the wave of optimism undulating across the country. Sure, the years under the Obama administration weren’t as rosy as they’d appeared on those “YES WE CAN” posters. But they weren’t that bad. Right?

 

Besides, we had Hillary. I watched Hillary Clinton decimate Donald Trump in the debates with tears in my eyes and pride in my heart. We were going to have our first female president. If I did decide to have children someday, they would grow up never questioning that a woman could be in charge.

 

As a cis white woman, I thought about power in an abstract sense, the way a palm tree imagines a blizzard. That’s the thing about privilege: it’s so inherent for those of us who benefit from it, most of the time we don’t even know it’s there. I knew my book would have magic—it was, after all, a fantasy—and magic typically involves an exploration of power. But that was just fiction. It wasn’t real.

 

Then November 2016 happened.

 

Suddenly, I caught a glimpse of what people of color, my LGBTQIA+ friends, and anyone from a marginalized community had known all along: the world was not an equal playing field. The game was rigged. I only got a taste of the reality they faced on a daily basis, but that taste was staggeringly bitter.

 

Though I will never understand their centuries of pain, I began to see the ripple effect of our new president’s policies. I could no longer afford my health insurance. On my last covered trip to the gynecologist, she urged me to consider an IUD. “Just to be safe,” she said. “Since we don’t know what’s going to happen.”

 

Meanwhile, one of my favorite nonprofits closed its doors after 20+ years. My local library had to abbreviate their hours, thanks to budget cuts. Nightmare stories began to pile in—hate crimes, casual racism, threats to deport kids from LA Unified. I did what everyone did: Unfriended bigoted relatives on Facebook. Read all the memes. Cried over the thought pieces. Called my representatives.

 

heart of thornsAnd then I took the draft of my debut novel—and I burned it to the ground.

 

Heart of Thorns didn’t start out as an expressly feminist fantasy. I hope everything I ever write is feminist, but not until the presidential election did the story truly snap into focus.

 

In the first two drafts of HoT, I had a fuzzy concept of an “evil king.” After Trump seized the throne, let’s just say that character emerged in high definition. For the first time I saw King Ronan of Clan Killian for what he was: a hateful tyrant who seals the borders, persecutes people of color, and abuses his bisexual son. A man who not only condones assaulting women, but makes it actual policy.

 

I wrote about the unmitigated reality of the United States: racism, misogyny, xenophobia, hate. Sci-fi and fantasy authors talk a lot about wordbuilding, but for me worldbuilding was a three-prong process: read the news, shudder in horror, then write it into fantasy.

 

As I shredded my draft to ribbons, a new question knit itself together in my brain. What if our bodies evolved to shift the power imbalance? What if the “tables turned” and magic focalized in a woman’s body gave her power over men? How would she use that power? For good, or for evil?

 

I knew in my bones I wanted to create a magical system in which the female body had evolved to right the imbalance of power. In the world of Heart of Thorns, this power is why women are feared and hated…but the more they are feared and hated, the more powerful they become.

 

This is a strange time to be alive. But if there is one thing I’ve learned from the heartbreaking events of the last two years, it’s that we have never needed stories more. Stories allow us to write about the horrors of the present—and they also empower us to write the future we desire.

 

In 2017, I launched Rock ‘n’ Write, a nonprofit dance and writing class for preteen and teen girls. Every week we come together to dance, write, and connect; to move our bodies and open our minds. What I tell my girls is, stories have power. Anyone who tells a story—or crawls inside the ones they read—does possess magic.

 

Today’s culture tries to alienate us, to remind us of the ways we are different. Books remind us of the ways we are the same. We need libraries now more than ever. We need librarians to lead kids to books. We need stories to shine light on every corner of humanity—the bad, the good, the resplendent. This is why we read. Always and forever, we yearn to be drawn into the light.

 

 

Meet Bree Barton

Bree BartonBree Barton is a writer in Los Angeles. When she’s not lost in whimsy, she works as a ghostwriter and dance teacher to teen girls. She is on Instagram and YouTube as Speak Breely, where she posts funny videos of her melancholy dog. Bree is not a fan of corsets.

Book Review: Hope Nation: YA Authors Share Personal Moments of Inspiration edited by Rose Brock

Publisher’s description

hope nationHope is a decision, but it is a hard one to recognize in the face of oppression, belittlement, alienation, and defeat. To help embolden hope, here is a powerhouse collection of essays and personal stories that speak directly to teens and all YA readers. Featuring Angie Thomas, Marie Lu, James Dashner, Nicola Yoon, David Levithan, Libba Bray, Jason Reynolds, Renée Ahdieh, and many more!

“The hope of a secure and livable world lies with disciplined nonconformists who are dedicated to justice, peace and brotherhood.”—Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

We all experience moments when we struggle to understand the state of the world, when we feel powerless and—in some cases—even hopeless. The teens of today are the caretakers of tomorrow, and yet it’s difficult for many to find joy or comfort in such a turbulent society. But in trying times, words are power.

Some of today’s most influential young adult authors come together in this highly personal collection of essays and original stories that offer moments of light in the darkness, and show that hope is a decision we all can make.

Like a modern day Chicken Soup for the Teenage Soul or Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff for TeensHope Nation acknowledges the pain and offers words of encouragement.

Authors include: Atia Abawi, Renee Ahdieh, Libba Bray, Howard Bryant, Ally Carter, Ally Condie, James Dashner, Christina Diaz Gonzales, Gayle Forman, Romina Garber, I. W. Gregario, Kate Hart, Bendan Kiely, David Levithan, Alex London, Marie Lu, Julie Murphy, Jason Reynolds, Aisha Saeed, Nic Stone, Angie Thomas, Jenny Torres Sanchez, Jeff Zentner, and Nicola Yoon.

 

Amanda’s thoughts

Let me first just say that I really wish the summary for this book didn’t compare this to inspirational books like Chicken Soup or Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff. For one, I’m not sure how relevant those comps are for actual modern teens, and for another thing, I see those things and immediately think, GACK, no thank you. While this is a book focused on hope and encouragement, it, to me, is nothing like those titles. It is far better. Thank goodness.

 

With the exception of Levithan’s fictional piece based on being at the Women’s March in Atlanta, the rest of this collection is essays from a wide variety of authors. Libba Bray writes about the car accident that changed her life and the hope she finds, loses, and learns will come around again. Angie Thomas discusses the current political climate, the publication of her book The Hate U Give, and three particular encounters after its publication. Ally Condie talks about, among other things, depression and the things and people that help with hope. Marie Lu writes about moving from China to America and survival and adaptation. Jeff Zentner talks about the hope that lies in young Book People and the power of stories. Nicola Yoon recounts the challenges of being an interracial couple. Kate Hart explores her combative relationship with hope. Gayle Forman takes on the topics of travel, hope, and life after 9/11. Christina Diaz Gonzalez talks about baseball, being the only Hispanic girl in her small North Florida town, and her Cuban grandmother. Atia Abawi writes about her dream of being a journalist, persistence, roadblocks, and believing in yourself. Alex London talks about the 90s, prom, drag, and the gender binary. Howard Bryant writes about his newspaper internship in a small Pennsylvania farm town and the lessons he learned there. Ally Carter reveals how long she kept her desire to be a writer a secret. Romina Garber recalls her move from Argentina to the US as a child and what it meant to be an immigrant. Renee Ahdieh  talks identity and how it shaped her. Aisha Saeed writes about apologies and being an American Muslim. Jenny Torres Sanchez discusses growing up afraid of her father and the abuse that he suffered as a child. Nic Stone talks about being African American in this post-2016 election era. Julie Murphy finds home and hope in unexpected places. I.W. Gregorio shares how a repressed teen grew up to become a urologist, and discusses breaking taboos and getting rid of awkwardness. Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely have a conversation about their tour for All American Boys and the conversations and kids who have stuck with them.

 

My favorite thing about anthologies has always been finding new authors to explore, and this collection, that offers so many personal stories and chances for readers to connect on a variety of shared experiences and interests, will surely point young readers toward new names. I am automatically repelled from anything billed as “inspirational” (it’s just how I’m built), but this look at hope and connection will show readers that they are not alone in their experiences, feelings, or concerns. Definitely worth picking up, even if just read to the pieces by your favorites. 

 

Review copy courtesy of the publisher

ISBN-13: 9781524741679
Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date: 02/27/2018

#SJYALit: The Lunar Chronicles as a Reflection of Current U.S. Political Climate, a guest post by Emily Keyes

Today as part of our Social Justice in YA Lit series, Emily Keyes discusses authoritarianism, othering, and The Lunar Chronicles.

lunarchronicles3

When I first started brainstorming this blog post, I planned to recommend a number of dystopian Young Adult novels whose plots exhibited the issues of authoritarian governments, racism, sexism, and other-ing in believable ways, in order to help teens better understand the current political climate and stay motivated to resist. I started what I thought would be a month-long reading binge of different series, from Divergent to Pretties to Unwound, but upon finishing each book, I kept coming back to what I feel is, to date, the best dystopian series, YA or otherwise, that I have ever read: Marissa Meyer’s Lunar Chronicles.

lunarchronicles2

Precisely what makes Meyer’s series so fantastic is that at the current moment, none of the things in her books seem remotely unbelievable. Both Lunar Chronicles’ world has: an authoritarian government, racism, sexism, classism, and economic crisis, all issues we are currently dealing with in the US.

When I began reading Marissa Meyer’s Lunar Chronicles, it was right when the US election was in full swing, and the characters, plot, and general state of the world built by Meyer’s imagination so closely mirrored my own that at times, it was a little spooky. What follows is a brief summary of the ways that Meyers represents authoritarian governments, racism, and other-ing, and how these representations can inform and inspire readers to fight against these injustices.

The character of Queen Levana Blackburn, the villain of the series, and, in my opinion, one of the most vividly crafted authoritarian leaders I’ve ever read, helped me better understand the motivations behind many of the political actions Donald Trump has made before and since entering the presidential office. Both Levana and Donald Trump have two main motivations: power and adoration.

lunarchronicles

Trump and Levana have a deep-seated need to be loved by their people, and are unwilling to admit that anyone would be unhappy under their rule. When faced with evidence of citizens’ discontent, however, they are both so shocked that they either deny it or let the distress of such a realisation begin to crumble their composure. Just look at how upset Trump was after the Women’s March. If we can continue to show our discontent through marches, protests, calls to legislature, we can affect distress such that our very own American Queen Levana starts to falter, and perhaps America’s Linh Cinder can step in.

The issues of racism and other-ing Meyers builds into the Lunar Chronicles world also mirror those same issues in the US. Earthen society differentiates between humans, androids and cyborgs. Only the former is considered normal and worthy of anything approaching respectful treatment and rights.

Androids are programed to be ‘useful’ above all else, making them naturally subservient to humans such that they often spend their lives as servants, prostitutes, or escorts. The main android in the series, Iko, has a glitch in her programming that gives her a vivacious personality and a kind heart, but she is still often treated, by both her friends and outsiders, as though she were somehow separate, made only to serve those around her.

Like androids, cyborgs in Earth’s Eastern Commonwealth also have no free will and are owned like property The series’ main character, Linh Cinder, experiences substantial prejudice because she is a cyborg. She is at risk of being drafted for plague cure testing, at the end of which she would be killed, her foot is taken away by her owner, and both doctors and friends handle her control panel without her permission. The treatment of both Iko and Cinder’s characters at various points in the series reminded me of the way women are often treated in society, as though we are objects undeserving of rights and capable of being owned or touched without our permission.

Lunars, those from the moon colony but residing on Earth, are perhaps the group receiving the most prejudice and injustice. Lunars cannot reveal their origin on Earth lest they risk being arrested and sent back to their colony to face no end of unimaginable punishments at the hands of Queen Levana. This reminded me of the current battle many immigrants, especially those from Latin America, face with US immigration forces attempting to deport innocent residents without cause.

The Lunar Chronicles’ depiction of the unequal treatment of beings resulting from differences in their gender, genetic makeup and origin perfectly mirrors the continuing issues with sexism, racism and other-ing in the US. Though there is no Happily Ever After at the end of the series, and no clean and tidy resolution of the issues relating to Iko and Cinder’s rights, the series’ end reminded me, and I hope it will remind other YA readers, that sexism, racism and other-ing cannot be defeated in day, but instead requires working together and making a continuous commitment to reversing the opinions, legislature and societal structure that supports inequality and the subjugation of certain groups of people.

Meet Our Guest Blogger

Emily Keyes is an avid reader of YA fiction finishing her Masters of Science in Digital Library Management at the University of Sheffield in Sheffield, England. Originally from Maryland, she hopes to work as a Special Collections Librarian for part of her career, using her previous degree in Medieval Studies to preserve and organise medieval manuscripts. She then hopes to work as a School Media Specialist in international schools. As an early-career librarian, she’s always looking for advice and recommendations about jobs, publications, and good books, and you can find her on Twitter @eckeyes.

DVD Review: Political Animals + Giveaway

When I’m reviewing books for professional publications, I stay quiet about them on social media. I’m always really excited once a review comes out to be able to talk about the book (or, in this case, DVD), finally! Here’s one of my most recent reviews, which originally appeared in the February 2017 issue of School Library Journal.

 

political animalsPolitical Animals

87 min and 53 sec., Dist. by the Video Project. 2016. $89.

Gr 9 Up–The personal is political in this examination of the hard-fought progress for LGBT rights. This engrossing documentary focuses on the work of the first four openly gay state legislators in California, all lesbians. Pioneering politicians Sheila Kuehl, Carole Migden, Jackie Goldberg, and Christine Kehoe (all elected between 1994 and 2000) advocated for laws protecting LGBT people and expanding civil rights. The film looks at the bills these groundbreaking legislators authored, such as one adding sexual orientation to the list of protected identities in schools. Included are extensive archival footage from legislative meetings from the 1990s and early 2000s, interviews with the women, information on their history of activism, and a reunion of the four. Fierce advocates for equal protection, the women also discuss the importance of straight allies and how it felt to listen to their colleagues fight against fundamental rights these four were being denied. The profile ends with the victory of marriage equality in 2015. The state assembly sessions scenes highlight the women’s impassioned speeches and the heated debates often marked by hostility from other legislators. Listening to testimonies and watching bills (particularly the one protecting LGBT students) fail repeatedly reveal just how hard the fight has been. This is a compelling and enlightening exploration of trailblazing women and their lawmaking. VERDICT: Highly recommended for public library collections where documentaries are popular and for high school history curricula on LGBTQ rights, pioneering women, and political movements.

 

Head on over to the Rafflecopter to enter to win this DVD. If you’re a librarian or a teacher, this would be a good addition to your collection! Ends Thursday, March 2. US ONLY. 

Sunday Reflections: Muslim Voices

Some of my favorite people on the planet.

Some of my favorite people on the planet.

If you know me at all, you know I am quite fond of my library minions. And when I say “my library minions,” I mean the teens and young adults I have gotten to know over the past many years working in high school and public libraries in central Minnesota. I’ve since moved and am not currently in a library, but I formed lifelong bonds with those minions. We talk and text. They come visit me. I’ve written college recommendations for them, and scholarship letters, and been a job reference. We’ve had endless lunches and dinners and coffee dates. They turn to me for advice. I am honored that many of them consider me a mentor. I love these kids. Fiercely. 

 

 

The flag of Somalia.

The flag of Somalia.

A large portion of my beloved minions are Muslims from Somalia. Minnesota’s Somali population is the largest in the United States. The area I lived in for the past decade, St. Cloud, has a HUGE Somali population. My young friends are amazing. They’re college students, tutors, grad students, volunteers, activists, med school students, writers, artists, and history-makers. They want to be doctors, lawyers, judges, authors, teachers, and therapists. As you might guess, when the travel ban was issued, I started furiously texting with some of my friends. A few of them sent me their thoughts, which I share with you here today.

 

 

From Sahra:

I feel like Trump has yet to comprehend that immigrants are an asset to society. In fact, they have always been. From early settlement in the thirteen colonies, to the era of industrialization, we have learned that it was foreigners who built the U.S.A from the ground up.

This country was established by people who escaped religious persecution in Europe and here we are denying immigrants access to a new life simply due to their religion.

We keep hearing “It’s not a Muslim ban, it’s not a Muslim ban,” but what do you call it when the only thing the 7 countries have in common is that (an astonishing majority) believe that “There is no God but Allah, and Mohamed (Peace and blessings be upon him) is his messenger”?

Fun fact: The immigrants I have had the pleasure to meet are so eager to start working as soon as they step foot in this country. I mean surely if they are working they are also paying taxes, and if they are paying taxes surely the government is benefiting.

But hey, what do I know?

Aside from that, I’m flabbergasted that a man with so little values, so little support, and so little common sense has become the president of the United States of America. At this point, we are lucky if we make it out alive by the time he gets impeached.

 

From Saido:

Do you know what it is like living in fear? Looking at everything from a different perspective. Analyzing every movement a person makes and thinking, what do they mean? Are they bullying me? I live like that every single day. I live in fear that someone might jump out of nowhere and attack me for no reason. It’s sad we live in a society where people are afraid to be themselves, and if they decided to become themselves, they become the target of a hate crime.

When I first heard about the ban, I thought it was a joke. Then I saw it on the news—people who were actually being held in the airport because they come from a country that the president thinks is a threat to this nation. I am a person who is from one of the countries the president now bans from entering the United States. I feel sad because I am an individual who has lived in this country for twelve years and I have not seen or heard about the threat my people are causing to this nation. It took me awhile to process this because,I have never heard of crimes that these countries that were put a ban have committed. On the other hand, I am glad to see people who are standing up for the rights of the refugees and also for the rights of those who are mistreated. I am a proud American citizen and I am thankful for the opportunity this country has given me.

 

From Khadija:

As citizens of the United States of America we enjoy a rare privilege. One that is not available to many people around the world. This is a privilege that I am acutely aware of at all times as a citizen with the freedom to express her thoughts and fight for what I think is right in the form of peaceful protests without fear of repercussions or violence. I want people who are oppressed to have the opportunity for a better life regardless of what religion they follow. It is my responsibility not just as a US citizen, but as a citizen of Earth to fight for peace and a world without violence and ignorance. Our best shot at unity is to advocate for peace.

Book Review: Factory Girl by Josanne La Valley

Publisher’s description

factoryIn order to save her family’s farm, Roshen, sixteen, must leave her rural home to work in a factory in the south of China. There she finds arduous and degrading conditions and contempt for her minority (Uyghur) background. Sustained by her bond with other Uyghur girls, Roshen is resolved to endure all to help her family and ultimately her people. A workplace survival story, this gritty, poignant account focuses on a courageous teen and illuminates the value—and cost—of freedom.

 

 

 

Amanda’s thoughts

Sixteen-year-old Roshen intends to continue her schooling to become a teacher. Her plans are changed for her when she is sent away to work in a factory in southern China. Roshen is devastated to have to leave her Muslim Uyghur family, who live near the Taklamakan Desert in northwest China. In addition to leaving behind her plans for school and her family, she leaves Ahmat, the boy she shares a special connection with and who it seems likely she will soon be engaged to. Roshen’s family isn’t told exactly where she will be taken, only that she will be gone for a year and is not allowed any devices or contact with her family. She and Ahmat set up a secret email address for her and devise a code, hoping she will be able to find internet stations and at least get a little information back to him. They expect that Roshen will be mistreated at the factory and discuss how she shouldn’t fight back. There may be spies and traitors among the girls, too.

 

Roshen and eleven other Uyghur girls are taken on the long journey to their factory. They’re led by Ushi, who is not only mean, but unfortunately also one of their bosses. They arrive to learn they will cut, sew, and finish work wear. It’s grueling work that’s hard on their bodies. The girls work very long hours, are hit with a rod if appearing unsatisfactory, are forced to speak Mandarin only (and penalized  if they speak Uyghur), aren’t allowed to wear their headscarves, and are often served meals with pork in them. They’re served tea with a drug in it to keep them awake so they can work longer hours. Many of the Chinese girls use clothespins to keep their eyes open. Additionally, the girls don’t even make money for many months as they are forced to pay for their trip from home to the factory, their meals, their uniforms, and the many unfair penalties they are assessed.

 

The twelve Uyghur girls are isolated from the rest of the workers and though they don’t all get along, and Roshen can’t stop wondering is someone is a spy, they bond together to help and protect one another. Roshen becomes a leader and learns how to work the system and avoid punishment as best she can. Roshen’s closest friend, Mikray, is defiant and determined to escape. Young Zuwida is in very poor health and only getting worse. Proud and haughty Hawa is selected to help the bosses by looking beautiful and being available to help placate clients. Eventually, Roshen, who speaks English in addition to Mandarin and Uyghur, is forced to go out with the boss and some clients. She is horrified by what is expected of her and receives some very unexpected (and heartbreaking) help. After returning to the factory, she is determined to allow herself to become gaunt, unwashed, and unappealing to avoid further assignments like this. Her decision has unintended consequences that leave her feeling incredibly guilty but also move her to further action.

 

Throughout all of her time at the factory, Roshen tries to remember the power of words. She clings to the songs and poems she has been taught and formulates her own. Her experience as a factory girl changes her forever. Roshen knows now that she will write, that she will tell the story of the factory girls. Generally well-written, the story’s one real downfall is the lack of development of many of the Uyghur girls, who don’t feel necessary beyond showing they are part of the block of girls isolated and most abused. At the same time, it’s the development of the girls who do carry pieces of the story, and their friendships and support, that make this story especially interesting and powerful. My ARC didn’t include the afterword, which apparently provides more context for the story and how La Valley came to tell it.  This harrowing story of exploitation, abuse, and forced labor is a compelling (and horrifying) look at a story (and a setting) not often seen in YA. 

 

Review copy courtesy of the publisher

ISBN-13: 9780544699472

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Publication date: 01/10/2017

Sunday Reflections: How the 2016 Election is Affecting Teens, Week 3 (A tweet story by Mary Hinson)

On Sundays, I have the privilege of hosting a weekly event that we call Spaghetti Sunday (inspired by author Christa Desir). We open our home to a wide group of people, eat food (not always spaghetti), do puzzles, play games, and just hang out. My beloved Mary Hinson (@knoxdiver on Twitter, YA assistant at Irving Public Library) is one of my treasured guests. And we usually have anywhere from 2 to 10 teens come.

The Bestie reading How the Grinch Stole Christmas to The Teen at Spaghetti Sunday

The Bestie reading How the Grinch Stole Christmas to The Teen at Spaghetti Sunday

It then became a more involved storytie

It then became a more involved storytime

Sometimes it gets wild

Sometimes it gets wild

No matter how loud it gets or how much chaos there is, these 2 teens always read through it

No matter how loud it gets or how much chaos there is, these 2 teens always read through it

Did I mention we eat a lot?

Did I mention we eat a lot?

Last night, Mary had a conversation with one of the teens which she tweeted about. She gave me permission to Storify those tweets and share them with you here. So in my ongoing quest to show you how the results are affecting teens, here's week three presented by Mary Hinson.

 



  1. Tonight I got to hang out 1 on1 with one of my fave teens. She told me about what's going on at school & then she broke down because she is


  2. Scared about what the election of the "screaming yam" (as she calls him) will mean for her marginalized friends. She told me how upsetting


  3. It is when kids at school make jokes about suicide. How offensive it is when boys make rape "jokes" or ask Hispanic classmates when they're


  4. Going to be kicked out of the country. I asked her if she felt safe. She said she feels okay for herself but she is terrified for others.


  5. Tonight I held this beautiful, kind, smart, sweet, pure-hearted child in my arms & together we cried about our future, our country's future.


  6. And I was so scred because I have become that non-parent adult I was told as a kid I could go to for help but I couldn't DO anything.


  7. I held this girl & rubbed her back & gave her napkins to blow her nose & told her how proud I am of her, how much I love her. I told her


  8. I'm here for her. But I'm heartbroken for this child who is witnessing the world's ugliness in ways no child ever should. And I'm angry that


  9. We, collectively, as a society, have failed these kids. It can't continue. Something has to change. WE have to change. LISTEN to those who


  10. Are speaking out--esp marginalized voices. SEEK the truth. EDUCATE yourself. STAND UP for those who need a shield & SPEAK OUT against hate.


  11. We're so lucky in this YA book community to have some really amazing people to turn to for advice & action items. LISTEN. TO. THEM.


  12. If you're not okay with everything happening right now, DO SOMETHING. Call your reps & talk. Leave messages. Send letters.


  13. Elected officials are supposed to represent us. Let them hear your voice. Attend community meetings. Get involved. Don't know what to say?


  14. You don't have to be a poli-sci major or a govt intern or whatever to talk with your reps. Call & let them know what matters to you.


  15. Tonight made me feel so emotionally raw. I didn't have the answers for this teen. But I know I want to fight for her. I want to fight for


  16. The teens & kids at my library. In my state. In our country. In the world. we need to bleed & fight for these kids. Adults, we've kind of


  17. Fucked everything up for them. We need to make it right for them & someday, they're gonna blow us all away.

Thank you Mary for being there for this teen last night. I adore you, even if you do dip your potato chips in ketchup.

spaghettisunday8

More on the Aftermath of the 2016 Election and Teens

Spending the Day After the 2016 Election with Teenagers

Now What? On Being a Librarian and a Book Lover After the 2016 Election

Things I Never Learned in Library School: On Being a Teen Librarian 2 Weeks After the 2016 Election

Sunday Reflections: My Teens Will be Voting in the Next Presidential Election

Things I Never Learned in Library School: On Being a Teen Librarian 2 Weeks After the Election of Donald Trump

thingsineverlearnedinlibraryschool

I knew eventually something like this would happen, I just didn’t think it would be so soon. The call came on Friday. A co-worker, her nephew took his own life. He was both black and gay and he saw the writing on the wall and he was scared. He read the news, he heard the hate, and he saw no future for himself. Just days later Trump supporters were seen praising the election results while making a Heil Hitler salute. (See: At White Supremacist Meeting: Nazi Salutes, Heil Hitler Chants ; White Nationalists Quote Nazi Propaganda, Salute Donald Trump)

****

Last night I went for a walk with The Teen. We walked long and far as she told me how sad she was about the racist things she was seeing and hearing in the middle school.

Why don’t you go back to where you came from? . . . .

I can’t wait until we build that wall . . . .

You are a terrorist . . .

****

Another friend reported that last week there were 2 sexual incidences at work. In one, an employee asked maintenance to get them a garbage can and they replied, “No, I’d rather see your tits.” In another, someone said a sexually assaultive remark and replied, “That’s just how men talk.” (See: Trump’s ‘locker room talk’ ; Donald Trump, ‘Locker-Room Talk’ and Sexual Assault)

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In the meantime, Donal Trump has met with the press and is already attempting to attack Freedom of the Press. He has tweeted out about the New York Times 7 times, stating that they are “not nice.” He has tweeted about Hamilton the Musical. You know what he hasn’t tweeted about? He hasn’t tweeted about the rising incidence of hate crimes, many of which are being carried out in his name. This is Trump’s America now some say, as they taunt, harass, and intimidate others. (See: Donald Trump Personally Blasts the Press – The New Yorker ; Billionaires vs. the Press in the Era of Trump ; Trump Says Freedom of the Press Must Go Because He’s ‘Not Like Other People ; Donald Trump’s War on Press Freedom)

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I was a librarian on 9/11. It was a scary time. I was in the library, working, when the towers fell. I remember the fear of not knowing what comes next. But there were some things that brought me comfort. The press, for example, was not under assault and being intimidated by our elected leaders.

This feels like scary new territory.

Freedom of the press and speech, those were things a lot of us took for granted. That fight had already been fought and won, I thought. As a librarian, it was – to me – a given. Now suddenly it is something I have to keep reminding myself and others to be vigilant about.

gloryobrien

A. S. King is one of my favorite teen authors. She writes surreallism. In her novel, Glory O’Brien’s History of the Future, “from ancient ancestors to many generations forward, Glory is bombarded with visions–and what she sees ahead of her is terrifying: A tyrannical new leader raises an army. Women’s rights disappear. A violent second civil war breaks out. And young girls vanish daily, sold off or interned in camps. Glory makes it her mission to record everything she sees, hoping her notes will somehow make a difference. She may not see a future for herself, but she’ll do anything to make sure this one doesn’t come to pass.” The book was written in 2014, and here we are in 2016.

The Hunger Games was a warning my friends, not a guide book. Dystopian literature was not meant to be a sounding board for government leaders, but a warning call to world citizens.

And yet here we are, 2016. Freedom of the press is being assaulted in the nation that felt so strongly about it that they made it the first item in the Bill of Rights. The very Nazis we once applauded Indiana Jones for defeating our saluting our newly elected leader. Men are talking about sexual assault and proclaiming, “that’s just how men are.” And our children are lining up to call each other racial slurs.

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At a recent conversation over at School Library Journal, YA author Michael Grant suggested that now was not the time to worry about little things like representation in kidlit and cultural appropriation. But the truth is, maybe we are here because we didn’t worry about it sooner.

See also: Spending the Day After the 2016 Election with Teenagers

Spending the Day After the 2016 Election with Teenagers

 

thingsineverlearnedinlibraryschoolI have been a teen services librarian for 22 years, maybe 23. I have sat with teenagers through a lot of moments. Many elections. 9/11. I have talked with them about war, the economy, and yes, about their abortions. Some teenagers we see once or twice, others we come to know more personally. They tell us their hopes and fears. They share who they are at the deepest core of their being. Wednesday I sat in a room of teenagers as they processed what this election meant for them. I tweeted about what I heard and saw and gather those tweets for you here. Listen to our youth, I implore you. We are their voice. Whatever we do next doesn’t just affect us, it affects them. Now and in the future.

 

TLT16
TeenLibrarianToolbox
@TLT16
Yesterday a teen came into the teen MakerSpace. She was shaking and gutted. She was drawn inward when she is usually so outgoing.
a day ago
TLT16
TeenLibrarianToolbox
@TLT16
Someone asked about the election and she said, “Do you know Pence wants to send gay kids away and torture them until they’re straight?”
a day ago
TLT16
TeenLibrarianToolbox
@TLT16
I know but I don’t know who else knew that she identifies as GLBTQ. In fact, 3 of the teens in that room did.
a day ago
TLT16
TeenLibrarianToolbox
@TLT16
Later a new teen brought up the election and it was getting heated, so I changed the subject. “Buy can we talk about Mike Pence?”, she said.
a day ago
TLT16
TeenLibrarianToolbox
@TLT16
“You’re really scared, aren’t you?”, I asked. “Yes, this cuts into my soul. They hate me,” she said.
a day ago
TLT16
TeenLibrarianToolbox
@TLT16
“They want to send me away and torture me,” she said. Here she was, standing before me, scared and dejected. Not scared, terrified.
a day ago
TLT16
TeenLibrarianToolbox
@TLT16
All I could do was tell her this: “There are many, many, adults who love you. We will continue to fight for your safety & civil rights.”
a day ago
TLT16
TeenLibrarianToolbox
@TLT16
But it honestly didn’t feel like much. It felt empty.it felt impotent against the backdrop of her very palpable fear.
a day ago
TLT16
TeenLibrarianToolbox
@TLT16
We have a handful of black kids who come to our space on a fairly regular basis. And they have increasingly shared the racist insults
a day ago
TLT16
TeenLibrarianToolbox
@TLT16
that have been hurled at them. We have had to intercede a couple of times in that very space to keep them safe. Racism is very real:
a day ago
TLT16
TeenLibrarianToolbox
@TLT16
I haven’t seen those kids all week. Not once. And I keep hoping they are safe and know that yes, they are loved. I miss them. I fear.
a day ago
Another teen posted this on her social media. She is 13. https://t.co/wb12FiRGYr
Another teen posted this on her social media. She is 13. pic.twitter.com/wb12FiRGYr
TeenLibrarianToolbox@TLT16
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a day ago
TLT16
TeenLibrarianToolbox
@TLT16
These are kids. Our kids. Our communities. We are supposed to be mentors and role models. And we shape their world. We are responsible.
a day ago
TLT16
TeenLibrarianToolbox
@TLT16
But listen, here’s what these examples prove. Our kids are watching. They are listening. They are learning, both the good and the bad.
a day ago
TLT16
TeenLibrarianToolbox
@TLT16
We. Must. Do. Better. We must be better. For ourselves. For each other. For them. For our now. For our future.
a day ago