Teen Librarian Toolbox
Inside Teen Librarian Toolbox

If You Like Buffy the Vampire Slayer, take 2

I am a huge Buffy the Vampire Slayer Fan. Huge.  So when I read books, I often find myself thinking, “Fans of Buffy will like this.”  Sometimes it is because of the plot: a feisty, chosen heroine who kicks supernatural butt.  Sometimes it is because of the writing style and dialogue, snarky, witty and full of that back and forth banter that Joss Whedon writes so well.  Whatever the reason, here are 5 new titles for Buffy fans looking for elements of the supernatural, wit and humor, snark galore, and the occasional kick-butt heroine.

The Collector by Victoria Scott
Dante Walker is a collector, sent to collect souls for The Big Guy down below.  He is smug and evil, just like Spike.  And just like Spike, he may find himself falling in love with someone on the wrong team. A great read for Buffy fans to be sure.  Full review hereProphecy Girl by Cecily White is another Entangled Teen title that Buffy fans are sure to love for the snarky voice and elements of the supernatural.


Hold Me Closer, Necromancer by Lish McBride
Sam thought he was a going no where slacker working at a fast food place, until a head shows up in a box on his doorstep and lets him know that he is a Necromancer, and a powerful one at that. Absurdly hilarious and perfect for Buffy fans everywhere.  Full review here.



The Embrace series by Jessica Shirvington
Violet Eden learns that she has the power to help fight evil in this series now being developed into a TV show for the CW.  Violet is a strong, kick-ass female in the tradition of Buffy.  Full review of here.

Every Other Day by Jenny Lynn Barnes
Every other day Kali is this world’s version of the slayer; strong, capable of kicking supernatural butt, and here to save the day (if only it weren’t against the law).  The problem? The girl at school, her father’s bosses daughter, has been marked for death on the every other day, the day when she is a perfectly normal teenage girl.  Full review here.



Alice in Zombieland by Gena Showalter
Alice discovers her overprotective father isn’t as crazy as she thought, unfortunately she discovers this while he is being eaten by zombies.  Now, well after a brief stint of fear and depression, she is joining forces with those who fight the creatures.  Showalter presents an interesting take on both zombies and the Alice in Wonderland tale.  Full review here.
Previously: Top 10 YA Titles That Buffy Fans Will Like
Also of Interest: Top 10 Things I Learned from Buffy the Vampire Slayer

Do Kick Butt Heroines Really Need to Kick Butt? A guest post by author Dawn Metcalf

Strong female protagonists: we love them, we admire them, and we want more of them! Give us more Buffys and Xenas, more Katsas and Katnisses, more Trises and Tallys, and more like our beloved Keladrys of Mindelan. We want our girls to be active, fighting for their lives and the lives of their friends, to be leaders, just and savvy, cool and smart, taking down governments and taking names! And while I am as much of a fan of these stories as the next rabid bookavore, I begin to worry—as a reader and a writer—whether “sharp, pointy stick” has become shorthand for “strong.”
            While there are many strengths in the world, the flashy ones like sword fighting, magic and kung fu action get all the press. Don’t get me wrong—most of my favorite stories (and favorite pastimes) feature that kind of strength, but when characters like Tally Youngblood and Beatrice “Tris” Prior begin to depend on their mental strengths alongside their physical ones, that’s when things get interesting! Subtly strong characters like Cammie Morgan and Frankie Landau-Banks use brains over brawn to subvert the Old Boy networks, and while Katniss Everdeen and Lena Duchannes both wield serious power, it is their love for others that makes them true heroines, showing us how strong they really are.
            Me, I love strong female protagonists! That’s why I wrote INDELIBLE.
Indelible, The Twixt book 1 by Dawn Metcalf
Coming in September 2013 from Harlequin Teen

Joy Malone is strong. An Olympic hopeful in Level 9 gymnastics, she left that world after her mother left the family and hasn’t been training in over a year. Friends, career, clear purpose and happy family: gone. Now Joy cares most about her best friend, Monica, her older brother, Stef, and her depressed father—votes are still out about how she feels about Mom—and is struggling to make this year better than the last while also trying to keep some things safely the same. So when Joy is accidentally pulled into a magical world of monsters and intrigue, immortal honor and revenge, she doesn’t let it take over her life, she meets it head-on, willing to risk anything to keep her family and friends safe. She may not have a pointy stick, but she has her wits, her resourcefulness, and her heart—along with a(n un)healthy dose of wariness and cynicism, deeply afraid of making mistakes.

And this is why Joy makes a lot of mistakes.
Yet making mistakes is where strength is truly tested.
Joy makes mistakes. Indelible Ink makes mistakes. Invisible Inq and Kurt and Graus Claude make mistakes. In fact, everyone in INDELIBLE makes some sort of mistake and Joy is the one I’m most proud of because she admits when she’s screwed up, she speaks up, and that’s one of the strongest things that anyone can do. There’s strength in that vulnerability when you admit that you were wrong, that you don’t know the right answer, and that you don’t know what to do. She’s scared sometimes and wrong sometimes and suspicious and angry and cruel sometimes—all those not-so-heroic things that real heroes feel—and she deals with it. And, sometimes, she even asks for help. That’s what makes Joy stronger when everyone else is throwing around magic and knucklebones and straight razor blades. She trusts herself enough to get over herself, learning to trust others because sometimes, being strong isn’t what’s best. Leaning on friends isn’t a weakness. Admitting fears isn’t a crime. And when she’s held answerable for her actions, she accepts it and does something about it. INDELIBLE is written for strong girls who might not know how strong they really are.
And that’s a strength I admire, no pointy sticks necessary.
INDELIBLE by Dawn Metcalf is due out by Harlequin Teen July 30, 2013.

Once Upon A Time…
…there was a headstrong fairy princess and a frog with an axe. But that’s another story.
My name is Dawn Metcalf and I write dark, quirky, and sometimes humorous speculative fiction. My debut novel, LUMINOUS, is a YA paranormal fantasy by Dutton Books and my next novel, INDELIBLE, is due out summer of 2013 by Harlequin Teen.

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Book Review: Necromancing the Stone by Lish McBride

The Brief Review:

I love this book hardcore and if you don’t read it minions will die and dragons will torch the Earth.  It will be all your fault.  Plus, you will be missing one of the most laugh out loud reading experiences you will ever have.  People will sit around at dinner parties talking about it, rolling in laughter, and you will feel left out and wonder what you are missing.  And what you are missing is awesomesauce!

The Real Review:

Necromancing the Stone is the sequel to Hold Me Closer, Necromancer by Lish McBride, a title that appears on my Top 10 Reads for Buffy Fans.  That is your first clue that this is a good series.  The question you are asking yourself is this: Why? Here are 5 reasons.

Synopsis: With the defeat of the evil Douglas behind him, Sam LaCroix is getting used to his new life. Okay, so he hadn’t exactly planned on being a powerful necromancer with a seat on the local magical council and a capricious werewolf sort-of-girlfriend, but things are going fine, right?

Well . . . not really. He’s pretty tired of getting beat up by everyone and their mother, for one thing, and he can’t help but feel that his new house hates him. His best friend is a werebear, someone is threatening his sister, and while Sam realizes that he himself has a lot of power at his fingertips, he’s not exactly sure how to use it. Which, he has to admit, is a bit disconcerting.

But when everything starts falling apart, he decides it’s time to step up and take control. His attempts to do so just bring up more questions, though, the most important of which is more than a little alarming: Is Douglas really dead? (from the Goodreads page)


The Snark is Strong with This One

Sam is a likable guy as a main character.  An “average Joe” really who doesn’t really know what to do with his skateboarding, fast food life until FATE takes over and we learn that Sam was never really average because he is a necromancer.  I will save you the trip to dictionary.com and tell you that a necromancer is someone who can raise and control the dead.  And Sam does all of this while punning away and providing snarktacular quips as asides.

 
“I know you’re frustrated, Sam, but the reality is you’re in a world now where the majority of the people you run into will be able to snap you like a twig.”

“My world was like that before.”
Lish McBride, Necromancing the Stone

 
“Slow down and explain to us plebeians. If you have to, use sock puppets.”
Lish McBride, Necromancing the Stone

Don’t Let the Snark Fool You, There is Depth

Many people get up in arms when magic and witchcraft and zombies appear in a book, and they definitely have a right to their personal opinions.  But here is the deal: Sam is an incredibly moral young man thrown into a bizarre world with incredible power that could absolutely corrupt him and he struggles immensely with making sure he uses that power responsibly.  He lives in a world where people murder people – even animals – without a second thought and yet Sam has second, third and fourth thoughts and makes some profoundly difficult and moral decisions.  And he is a vegetarian; again another personal lifestyle choice, but another example of how he regards the sanctity of life and his moral character.  A lot of paranormal fiction I read (and I read a lot) has some shady ethics and puts some admittedly despicable characters on a pedestal.  Seriously, sometimes the heroine in paranormal falls in love with a guy that you wouldn’t want your worst enemy dating in real life.  For example, although I love many things about Masque of the Red Death and feel it is an excellent book, one of the 2 male sides of the love triangle just squicks me out – he would not be a real life option for anyone other than those type of girls that write letters to serial killers in prison.  But I digress, my point is this:  Sam is likable, relateable, commendable, funny and thoughtful.  I don’t mean thoughtful like he’ll bring you flowers and open doors on a date, but thoughtful in that he thinks about this world he has been thrust into and what it all means and who he wants to be as a part of it.  He uses both his heart and his noggin to navigate the landscape.  Bottom line: Readers will like Sam and root for him.

 
“Life is a series of calculated risks, James. I happen to think that this one is worth it.”
Lish McBride, Necromancing the Stone
 
“Sometimes life offers you up that kind of dichotomy, that soul-shearing rift of two very different things happening at once.”
Lish McBride, Necromancing the Stone
 
“Fear, left unchecked, can spread like a virus.”
Lish McBride, Necromancing the Stone

The Joss Whedon Family Effect

I believe the underlying meme of the Whedonverse is that we are broken people and we build our own families.  And is this not the quest of the teenage years to find your pack (or hive or group or whatever)?  And the reality is, friends and family sometimes fail us – we can forgive or wake up one day as old cranky people yelling at the neighbors to stay off of our lawn.  Sam’s story is one about finding family, choosing to love and forgive, and accepting the weirdness that comes when your best friend can turn into a grizzly bear.  What?  Oh, did I not mention there were a lot of cool fantasy elements and characters?  My bad.  There are.  It is fun.  There are dragons.  I want a dragon.

“And maybe I was a fool, but I wanted to believe – I needed to believe – that James had started to see us all as friend. As family.”
– Lish McBride, Necromancing the Stone

Bonus Points for Strong Women

I am a huge fan of Brooke.  And Brid.  This is our Brid: “I’m sorry, did you just try to order me around?” (p. 297).  Sam and Brid have some serious bumps in their relationships here; although to be fair, they did meet while being held hostage in a cage together in book one.  Plus, Brid is surrounded by a pack of alpha males that she is supposed to lead, which is no doubt challenging.  And she doesn’t really have an easy time of it here in book 2.  McBride puts her characters through some unkind challenges, because even in the midst of paranormal worlds, real life still happens.  That’s the beauty of it – the characters and heartbreak are relatable even if you won’t find yourself surrounded by magical creatures and such.  But I am holding out hope for Sam and Brid.

Name That Tune

As with Hold Me Closer, Necromancer, every chapter title is a song lyric.  I wondered if McBride would go with movie titles given the nod to Romancing the Stone as the title, but it’s song lyrics.  Right there you have a fun built in contest or way to use your social media page with teens – have them find out what song the lyrics are from.  You will want to as you read.  (Okay so I just went and looked it up, there is a song called Romancing the Stone by Eddy Grant.  The universe is once again in synergy.)

Sample chapter titles:
Hello darkness, my old friend
Our house, was our castle and our keep
Hello, is it me you’re looking for?
Summertime, and the living is easy

I obviously like and recommend this series.  It gets bonus points because I think teen guys will read and love it and Sam.  I am always looking for good guy reads, it is my quest.  Pair this series with A Bad Day for Voodoo by Jeff Strand and Unspoken by Sarah Rees Brennan.  Necromancing the Stone by Lish McBride is nominated for the 2012 Cybils in the Teen Science Fiction/Fantasy category.  It was published in 2012 by Henry Holt. ISBN: 978-0-805-09099-4. 4.5 out of 5 stars.

Top 10 Reads for Buffy fans
Book Review: A Bad Day for Voodoo by Jeff Strand
Book Review: Unspoken by Sarah Rees Brennan

The Sunnydale Project, a celebration of all things Buffy

Buffy the Vampire Slayer is a whole bundle of awesome.  There are few other shows that have tapped into the zeitgeist so perfectly an explained with humor, pathos and vampires – yes, vampires – the suck that can sometimes be the teenage years.  Although the TV show has ended, the vision of Buffy lives on through books and even comic books.  Joss Whedon writes brilliant characters and television, and then a whole bundle of amazing writers have expanded the verse through books and comic books to keep us enlightened and entertained.  For the months of September and October, we will be exploring that verse and what it means to us personally as librarians, as readers and as fangirls.

The original post announcing the Sunnydale Project can be found here

In celebration of the awesomeness that is Buffy, 3 book bloggers have been working hard all summer to plan this 2 month event: Rachelia @ Bookish ComfortsPatricia @ Patricia’s Particularity, and Karen @ Teen Librarian’s Toolbox. During this event we will be reviewing Buffy books, comics, and episodes as well and sharing some fanfic, delving into some of the characters, and looking at some topics and issues within the Buffy world (such as feminism). We will also have some guest posts from other amazing Buffy fans, hearing their thought and obsession! And what would an event be without a giveaway or two?! There will be plenty of giveaways for you to enter!

Each hosting blog will have their own schedule, providing you with as many views as possible. So please be sure to check out their schedules: Rachelia @ Bookish Comforts & Patricia @ Patricia’s Particularity.

 

September

10 Things I Learned from Buffy with Christie G
X Marks the Spot: Family in the Buffyverse with Karen J
Necromancing the Slayer: Hold Me Closer Necromancer (Lish McBride) will make Buffy fans happy with Karen J (Saturday Scavenger Hunt)
Embrace the Slayer: Embrace (Jessica Shirvington) will make Buffy fans happy with Karen J (Saturday Scavenger Hunt)
Who watches the Watchers? A guest post about librarians by Ilsa J. Bick and why Ashes is a great read for Buffy fans (Saturday Scavenger Hunt)

October

Being the “Slayer” Every Other Day by Jennifer Lynn Barnes with Karen J
Down the Zombie Hole: Alice in Zombieland by Gena Showalter
Sometimes the girl gets to be the hero, Buffy as a feminist hero by Molly Wetta
10 YA Books that Buffy Fans will want to Read
Buffy on the page and on the screen, seasons 8 and 9 by Maria Selke
Buffy and the Reversal of Halloween, a guest post by Nancy Holder

 
This is our Sunnydale Project headquarters here at TLT.  Keep checking back for post updates and fun contests.  All posts will be linked to this page.  And be sure to keep checking all three blogs for a complete look at the awesomeness that is The Sunnydale Project.
 
Sunnydale Project Scavenger Hunt
 
Did you notice some words written in red in this post? If not, go back and take a look. You’ll want to, I can reassure you. Why? Because we are having a Buffy themed scavenger hunt! How fun is that? To find out how to participate, read the details below. And I know you’ll want to participate because we are working on getting some GREAT prizes lined up for the winners!
  • Each week on our Slayer Saturday posts look for the words highlighted. There will be 3 sets of words each weekend, so make sure to visit all three blogs (Bookish Comforts, Patricia’s Particularity and Teen Librarian Toolbox).
  • Write down the words each week (Sept. 8 – Oct. 20), putting them in an order that makes sense. All together these words create a quote from Buffy.
  • During the last week a form will be made available on all three blogs where you can turn in the quote that you have pieced together.
  • On the last weekend of The Sunnydale Project, Oct. 27, the quote will be revealed! We will then draw a winner from those who have correctly completed the quote.
Giles: Into each generation, a Slayer is born. One girl in all the world, a chosen one. One born with the…
Giles, Buffy: -the strength and skill to hunt the vampires…
Buffy: To stop the spread of their evil blah, blah, blah, I’ve heard it, okay?


It is my understanding that not all the words appeared as they were supposed to so if you send an email to me at kjensenmls@yahoo.com telling me what words appeared in Red here on TLT and in what posts, you will be entered to win.  We will be giving away a small collection of Buffy the Vampire Slayer Books of 4 to 5 titles.  Contest entries will be accepted through November 10th.

Buffy and the Reversal of Halloween, a guest post by Nancy Holder

Fangirl Moment of Introduction: You are probably aware that I am a huge Buffy the Vampire Slayer fan.  I have read almost every book and one of the worst days of my professional life was when I had to finally discard the collection because it was quite literally falling apart.  The first book I ever reviewed for VOYA in 2001 was in fact a Nancy Holder book. So this is a truly amazing moment for me as she has so graciously agreed to write a guest blog post for our The Sunnydale Project.  Ladies and gentleman (squeeeee), Nancy Holder . . .

It’s a truism among horror writers that the hardest part of a horror story is the ending. Writers know that for readers and viewers, becoming involved in the scary is like doing the tango—you give yourself, you take yourself back—as you tangle with getting frightened. One way viewers and readers do this is to try to guess the ending. Next time you’re watching Buffy, see if I’m not right—Joss and the writers start laying in the clues about the what’s going to happen as soon as you see the first image on the screen. Then they lead you through a Halloween corn maze of twists and turns (when that’s done onscreen, it’s called “schmucking the bait”) until you reach the exit. I think this underlying, so-very-intentional structure is one of the (many) reasons Buffy endures as a show.

            When Chris Golden and I pitched ideas to write the first-ever original Buffy novel (as opposed to an episode novelization), we included a Halloween story. Like the rest of the world at the time, we assumed that Halloween night would be like the Super Bowl for the Slayer, and that’s how we wrote the story, and how it was published. We had yet to come to know (and love!) Joss’s penchant for reversals.

            A reversal is when you get the opposite of what you expect in a story. “The Gift of the Magi” is a sort of a reversal. The two halves of a loving couple sacrifice the one thing they cherish to buy each other a Christmas present: the husband sells his pocket watch to buy combs for his wife’s hair, which she, meanwhile, cuts and sells to purchase a chain for his pocket watch. The reversal is that they realize they’ve just given each other the best present ever—proof that they are committed and loyal, and their relationship is a precious Christmas miracle. Comedy also depends on reversals—the big laughs come when the joke or story takes an unexpected turn. What’s the most common thing people say when they’re telling a funny story? “Wait for it.” And we do, with an anticipatory grin.

            I think this love of the unexpected is one of the sources of the Joss quote that he didn’t/doesn’t give his fans what they want, but what they need. They need to be intrigued, entertained, to laugh, and to be frightened. So he gives them reversals.

            Thus it was with Halloween. Because Buffy first came on the air in March, she didn’t have a Halloween episode until seven months later, in her second season. But March is when Chris and I wrote Halloween Rain(in three and a half weeks!) and we weren’t thinking about reversals. So although our story was approved, it’s out of canon—because the Slayer and her quarry have mutually agreed to take Halloween off every year (unless you’re Ethan Rayne, and then as agreeable as you appear to be, you break the rules.)
 
 

            It didn’t take Chris and me long to figure out that reversals were part and parcel of life in Sunnydale. Angel, Buffy’s first true love, is a vampire. Jonathan does not confess to taking fish-monster steroids, but to peeing in the pool.  As soon as Buffy gives her heart to Scott Hope, he breaks up with her. The morning after Tara and Willow reunite, Tara dies. And of course, the ending of the series (on TV) features the biggest reversal of all—the Chosen One, “she and she alone,” is not only not alone, but she shares her power with all the Potentials.

            The night that Buffy went off the air, I couldn’t make myself watch the episode. I had signed a non-disclosure agreement in return for receiving a “beat sheet” that told the story in brisk, narrative form. I knew what was going to happen, and I knew that Buffy was going to get her happy ending. But I approached that last episode as I would the death of a loved one—I mourned. I didn’t think I would ever have such a wonderful gig again as writing about Buffy. I had been there from the beginning of the show to the end, and I really did think it was the end. (Karen just cried reading this part)

            But I’ve had my own reversal. Fifteen years after I started writing Halloween Rain, I’m still writing about Buffy. I have a brand new Buffy book coming out in December titled Buffy: The Making of a Slayer, from 47 North. I wrote the text and helped the book’s producers find images from many of the original staff members such as John Vulich (special makeup effects); Todd McIntosh (makeup); Carey Meyer and Steve Hardie (production designers); and Cynthia Bergstrom (costume designer.) I was also able to talk about Buffywith Amber Benson, Jane Espenson, David Fury, and some of the original moves and shakers in Buffy fandom.
 

            The book was greenlighted by Joss himself, whose original mission statement was to create a character who would find her way as an icon into the zeitgeist of our times.  There was no reversal there—I meet new fans who come to Buffy after discovering Dr. Horrible or Firefly. Buffy continues to be a beloved figure in the ongoing canonical comic book series from Dark Horse Comics. Despite all the prophesies assuring the Slayer an early death, Buffy continues.

            And I’m willing to bet there’ll be a Slayer or two at my door on my very busy Halloween night.      

BIO: New York Timesbestselling author Nancy Holder has written more non-show material about Buffy the Vampire Slayer than any other writer in this dimension. She has received five Bram Stoker Awards for her supernatural fiction, and has been nominated for two more, including for The Angel Chronicles, Volume 1. BtVS: The Watcher’s Guide, Volume 1, appeared on the Los Angeles Times bestseller list. She is a member of the Whedon Studies Association and a Browncoat. Find her at @nancyholder and https://www.facebook.com/holder.nancy. She has a website at www.nancyholder.comShe lives in San Diego with her daughter, Belle the Vampire Slayer, two dogs, three cats, and a leopard gecko.
 
Nancy Holder is now also writing for the Teen Wolf series.  You can check out her book On Fire at Goodreads or on Nancy Holder’s webpage. Buffy: The Making of a Slayer is scheduled for publication on December 11th, 2012.  You can find out more about it at Goodreads.
 

Top 10 YA Books that Buffy fans will want to read . . .

As you know, we are in the midst of our Sunnydale Project here at TLT, where we are discussing all things Buffy blah blah blah.  Today I share with you some of my favorite must reads that will definitely satisfy Buffy fans.

Rotters by Daniel Kraus

Buffy has spent her fair share of time hanging out in graveyards waiting for vampires to rise so she can stake them through the heart.  Joey spends a lot of time in graveyards at night too, but for completely different reasons.  Sure our Slayer was quipping and the show could be funny, but sometimes it was seriously dark.  And trust me, Rotters is seriously dark and twisty and reminiscent of some of the best moments and themes of Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

Morganville Vampires by Rachel Caine
Glass Houses is book #1

 
“Run first,’ Shane said. ‘Mourn later.’
It was the perfect motto for Morganville.” 

 

What if you went to college and learned that your college town had a secret underworld of vampires? Yeah, that’s what happens.  I love this series.  Claire’s roommates may not be showing any signs of life, but there are more than just vampires here – which makes it even more fun.

 
“There’s a ghost in this house! An unquiet spirit!”
Unquiet spirit?” Shane said under his breath. “Is that politically correct for pissed off? You know, like Undead American or something?”
 

Full Tilt by Neal Shusterman

“They were the screams of riders torn apart by the twisted reflections of their own inner selves.”
 
 


In Hush, the Gentlemen came to town and in the most amazing episode of television, and the most silent, the Gentlemen wreaked havoc and gave us all nightmares.  Full Tilt is a throwback to the days of Ray Bradbury – think Something Wicked This Way Comes.  In a very special Halloween episode of Buffy, our Scooby gang become their costumes.  Full Tilt reminds me of that kind of Buffy episode.  Blake and Quinn are brothers who find their very souls at stake when they visit a phantom carnival.  They have to ride all the ride – and they are not your normal rides – before the sun comes up or hand over their souls.
 
Bruiser by Neal Shusterman

“There’s a reason why Brewster can’t have friends – why he can’t care about too many people. Because when he cares about you, things start to happen. Impossible things that can’t be explained. I know, because they’re happening to me.”
 
 

Speaking of Neal Shusterman, one of my favorite and most underrated books ever is Bruiser by Shusterman.  This book reminds of the more emotional Buffy episodes where people can suddenly hear others thoughts.  In Bruiser, Bruiser can literally take away other people’s pain, but it means that he has to feel them.  This is an amazing and thoughtful book and if you haven’t read it yet, you should.

The Fury Trilogy by Elizabeth Miles
Fury book 1, Envy book 2

The town of Sunnydale was built right on top of the Hellmouth, and it has secrets.  Fury introduces us to a town with supernatural secrets as well.  The town in question is Ascension, Maine and Ascension is an automatic nod to Buffy, right.  Here our main characters Em and Chase are being haunted, literally, by the things they have done and someone – or some thing – is very angry.

Kill Me Softly by Sarah Cross

“You went out and made magic. Made your own wishes come true.” 
 
 


There are moments on Buffy where everyone steps into some bizarro world and then suddenly, they are the Halloween costume they are wearing.  Or they become literal neanderthals from the beer that they drink.  Or they are being chased around by a cheese man in their dreams. Kill Me Softly is a look at a world where many people are living lives that are twisted version of the fairy tales.  See that girl hobbling over there down the street? She is obviously supposed to be the stepsister from Cinderella and the show didn’t fit so she hacked off her toes.  This is a dark, interesting look at a world that you can definitely see our Scooby gang making a visit too.

I Hunt Killers by Barry Lyga

“Jazz hadn’t given her many details of exactly what life in the Dent house had been like, but he’d told her enough that she knew it wasn’t hearts and flowers. Well, except for the occasional heart cut from a chest. And the kind of flowers you send to funerals.” 
 
 


At some point or another, it seems like everyone in the Buffyverse has to try and hold back the evil inside them.  Anya is of course a demon and Angel and Spike are vampires, so they are quite literally trying to hold back evil.  But even Buffy had times where she is tempted into darkness.  And let’s not forget the story arc where Willow became addicted to magic.  I Hunt Killers by Barry Lyga is also about a boy trying to hold back the evil he fears inside of him: his father is the world’s most notorious serial killer, so what does that make him.

The following books were previously reviewed and discussed.  Please click on the titles to read the reviews:

Hold Me Closer, Necromancer by Lish McBride
Embrace/Entice by Jessica Shirvington
Every Other Day by Jenny Lynn Barnes
Ashes/Shadows by Ilsa J. Bick
Alice in Zombieland by Gena Showalter

Slayer Scavenger Hunt

Did you notice some words written in red in this post? If not, go back and take a look. You’ll want to, I can reassure you. Why? Because we are having a Buffy themed scavenger hunt! How fun is that? To find out how to participate, read the details below. And I know you’ll want to participate because we are working on getting some GREAT prizes lined up for the winners!
  • Each week on our Slayer Saturday posts look for the words highlighted. There will be 3 sets of words each weekend, so make sure to visit all three blogs (Bookish Comforts, Patricia’s Particularity and Teen Librarian Toolbox).
  • Write down the words each week (Sept. 8 – Oct. 20), putting them in an order that makes sense. All together these words create a quote from Buffy.
  • During the last week a form will be made available on all three blogs where you can turn in the quote that you have pieced together.
  • On the last weekend of The Sunnydale Project, Oct. 27, the quote will be revealed! We will then draw a winner from those who have correctly completed the quote.
We really hope you have fun with this! We’re still finalizing the prize, but it’ll be worth participating for! An announcement will be made when all details have been finalized.
 
And yes, there are a few more than titles on this list – but I can live with that.  What would you add?

Buffy, off the screen and on to the page: seasons 8 and 9 (guest post by Maria Selke)

Buffy the Vampire Slayer appeared on TV for 7 seasons, but that is not the end of the story.  In a unique twist, Joss Whedon continued the story of the Buffy verse in comic book seasons.  So far there has been a season 8 and 9.  They are released as serial comics and then compiled into a graphic novel that works much better for libraries.  I love that Joss Whedon is using the written word to continue to spread his message even though the tv show is no longer.  Today, guest blogger Maria Selke reviews seasons 8 and 9 for us.


I have a confession to make – I didn’t start watching Buffy the Vampire Slayer until partway through season two. It was at the recommendation of some online gaming friends that my husband and I took the plunge and started to watch the series. For you young things out there, that online RPG required us to have dialup Internet access! Ahem… but I digress. 

We had a good run, Joss and I. I spent a glorious seven years watching Buffy grow up, fall in love, die, come back to life, fight off every possible form of the apocalypse, and do it all over again. I followed Angel to his show and had a son around the same time he did. Midnight feedings? You’d find me on the couch with a Buffy rerun. Saying goodbye to the Scooby gang was far from easy.



I moved on, though the powerful messages of the Whedonverse stuck with me. So many of the Sunnydale Project posts have done an excellent job explaining exactly what those messages have meant to us all over the years.

Of course, the journey doesn’t have to be over. I didn’t realize that until recently, when I discovered that Buffy had continued into a season 8 comic. By that point, season 9 was about to begin, so I eagerly devoured the trades. In the comics, there were no special effect budgets to consider. No sets to construct. The world could be exactly as the Whedon team wanted it to be – with a world full of slayers who are learning how to handle their power.  Joss being Joss, though, we do lose a few beloved characters along the way.
If you haven’t yet experienced the world of Buffy comics, you may be amazed by the ongoing story.  I reviewed many of the season 8 trades on Fandom Post.
Volume 1: The Long Way Home (the first 5 issues of season 8) is reviewed by one of the other reviewers on the site. http://www.fandompost.com/2011/06/28/buffy-the-vampire-slayer-season-8-vol-1-the-long-way-home-tpb-review/ 
Volume 2:  No Future for You: This arc brings Faith back into the picture, and also has a heavy focus on Xander. I love the heart of the team. http://www.fandompost.com/2011/08/15/buffy-the-vampire-slayer-season-8-vol-02-no-future-for-you-review/
Volume 3: Wolves at the Gate: Remember when Dracula was on Buffy? You’ll see him again here. Very funny stuff! I loved this arc a lot. http://www.fandompost.com/2011/08/24/buffy-the-vampire-slayer-season-8-vol-03-%E2%80%93-wolves-at-the-gate-review/

Volume 4: Time of Your Life: This arc jumps into the future world, with the slayer Fray. I was glad I read this as a trade, because it took a bit to get into the swing of it all. The final issue of this set was a dream Buffy has of being in Sunnydale. Definitely enjoyed that one. http://www.fandompost.com/2011/09/02/buffy-the-vampire-slayer-season-8-vol-04-%E2%80%93-time-of-your-life-review/

While I read the other parts of season 8, I didn’t review them. This was about when season 9 started up, and I jumped into reviewing single issues whenever I could.
Season 9 is now in full swing, and it has something for every Buffy aficionado. There are two main lines running in this season; “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” and “Angel and Faith”.
Buffy picks up where season 8 left off, with the loss of magic in the world. The first arc is appropriately called “Free Fall”, as Buffy is tumbling into a life more ordinary than she could have expected.  Spike is here to help, though he keeps warning about something mysterious rumbling on the horizon.
I’ll link up to a few reviews here, but you can find more at Fandom Post:  

Issue 1 http://www.fandompost.com/2011/09/13/buffy-the-vampire-slayer-season-9-1-review/

Buffy handles a new job, Xander and Dawn juggle helping Buffy with their budding relationship, and Willow deals with the fallout of the disappearance of magic. Andrew even jumps back into the storyline with humorous results. Even though there were some plot points I felt were handled poorly, overall it’s been a fun season so far.

While both series have fabulous teams of writers and artists, I’m finding Angel and Faithto be my favorite right now. 

Desperate to learn more about Giles and his younger years? The first arc of Angel and Faith, “Live Through This”, has some amazing flashbacks to his younger years.  The dialogue between Angel and Faith is dead on, and they make a dramatic team.

Love Drusilla’s broody insanity? Angel and Faith brings her back in the arc “Daddy Issues”. We also get a peek into Faith’s past as we meet her father. Check out a review of the issue 6, which is the start of this arc. http://www.fandompost.com/2012/01/25/angel-faith-6-review/

The current arc, “Family Reunion”, is my favorite one yet. Willow arrives, and the team recruits Angel’s son Connor to help them enter a hell dimension and find a way to restore magic to earth.  Read my review of issue 11, which is the start of the Family Reunion arc. http://www.fandompost.com/2012/07/13/angel-faith-11-review/

Issue 14 came out September 26th, and I haven’t gotten a review in yet, but I’d be a failure if I didn’t show you this adorable variant cover. Check out more information at the Dark Horse site: http://www.darkhorse.com/Comics/19-622/Angel-Faith-14-Rebekah-Isaacs-variant-cover

Finally, there are two extra special minis that will be part of this season. The first focuses on Spike, and has already started. Seriously, friends, you want to read this one. My review of the first is live at Fandom Post, in case you want more details. Really want to check it out? You are in luck – assuming you win. I’m giving away a copy of the first and second issues of Spike to one lucky reader!

http://www.fandompost.com/2012/09/18/buffy-the-vampire-slayer-spike-1-review/

The second features Willow, and won’t begin until she’s finished with her run on Angel and Faith. The Dark Horse site has it listed as being available in November.

Even if you’ve never been a comic reader, I encourage you to give this season a shot. I hadn’t read any comics, and I loved how the art, lettering, and writing brought my beloved characters back into my life.

Interested in winning those first two issues of the Spike mini? Take a moment and tell us how you feel about Spike (or any vampire, if you don’t know Spike). One lucky commenter will receive both comics!
Maria Selke blogs at Maria’s Melange.  You can read all about it and join her for Sci Fi Fridays.
Slayer Scavenger Hunt
Did you notice some words written in red in this post? If not, go back and take a look. You’ll want to, I can reassure you. Why? Because we are having a Buffy themed scavenger hunt! How fun is that? To find out how to participate, read the details below. And I know you’ll want to participate because we are working on getting some GREAT prizes lined up for the winners!
  • Each week on our Slayer Saturday posts look for the words highlighted. There will be 3 sets of words each weekend, so make sure to visit all three blogs (Bookish Comforts, Patricia’s Particularity and Teen Librarian Toolbox).
  • Write down the words each week (Sept. 8 – Oct. 20), putting them in an order that makes sense. All together these words create a quote from Buffy.
  • During the last week a form will be made available on all three blogs where you can turn in the quote that you have pieced together.
  • On the last weekend of The Sunnydale Project, Oct. 27, the quote will be revealed! We will then draw a winner from those who have correctly completed the quote.
We really hope you have fun with this! We’re still finalizing the prize, but it’ll be worth participating for! An announcement will be made when all details have been finalized.

Sometimes, the Girl Gets to be the Hero (Buffy as a Feminist Hero by Molly Wetta)

I watched my first episode of Buffy the Vampire Slayer my freshman year of college. I went home for a weekend because I was distraught after breaking up with my high school boyfriend. My younger sister, in an attempt to cheer me up, said, “at least your ex-boyfriend isn’t going around killing your friends,” and then forced me to watch “Passions” with her.
 
 

This was also just about the time I started to identify as a feminist. I was aware of feminism as a high schooler, but I never proclaimed myself a feminist until I took Social and Political Philosophy with the director of the Women’s Studies program my first year in college. The confluence of my own feminist awakenings and my discovery of BtVS has inextricably woven the two together in my mind. I have always viewed Buffy through a feminist lens.



But even if one is not predisposed to associate Buffy with feminism, the show still provides a framework for exploring various feminist issues. The show’s concept deliberately subverts a common teenage female stereotype of the ditzy blonde cheerleader by imbuing her with supernatural powers that give her not only the strength but the obligation to save the world. There is an entire subfield of cultural studiesdedicated to exploring the myriad of questions that Buffy prompts, and I’m not attempting to cover the ground of an academic discipline in a blog post. Whether or not you think Buffy the Vampire Slayer is a feminist show, there’s no doubt that it invites discussion of feminism, which is an important reason it’s still relevant ten years after going off the air and why the comics, graphic novels, and related publications are read by fans both old and new.

 
“This is why Joss Whedon is my Hero”
Image from Shawnee Small blog
Arguments can be made both in favor and against BtVS as feminist. Though the show’s creator, Joss Whedon, is a self-identified feminist who explicitly states that Buffy is intended as a feminist work, Sarah Michelle Gellar, the actress who portrays Buffy, has claimed in interviews that she doesnt label herself as a feminist. This tension is at the heart of what makes BtVS great. There aren’t easy answers, but complicated contradictions that allow viewers to explore issues from gender to sexuality, ethics to metaphysics.  

Buffy is a girly-girl. She may be able to kick some demon butt, but the first thing she wants to do after destroying the Hellmouth is go to the mall. In part, due to the proliferation of kick-butt girls in YA fiction that reject femininity, there is a common misconception among some teens that for a girl to be “strong” she can’t embrace her girliness at the same time. Buffy offers another way of being a strong young woman. She hunts vampires in stylish leather boots and halter tops, staking them just after delivering a snappy pun.  

Being a vampire slayer results in several complications in Buffy’s life—many of them romantic. From having your boyfriend turn evil after you sleep with him (Angel), to having your boyfriend resent you for being stronger (Riley), to engaging in a self-destructive relationship fraught with violence (Spike), Buffy experiences a wide spectrum of heartache. Buffy’s romantic entanglements are more than just good drama, however—they can prompt reflection by those navigating real-life relationships. Buffy makes mistakes, and learns from the consequences. Buffy writers did not shy away from controversial topics like teen sex, dating violence, and attempted rape. During the series finale, Buffy explains to Angel that she is “cookie dough” that’s “not done baking yet.” Her primary interest is in finding out who she is, rather than allowing a romantic relationship to define her.  

BtVS was a groundbreaking show. Whether it was the critically acclaimed silent episode “Hush” or the musical episode “Once More with Feeling” before Glee was a hit, Joss Whedon was a pioneer pushing the limits of the pop culture frontier. Perhaps the most important achievement of BtVS was exploring the first lesbian romance on television. Willow and Tara had a complex relationship that wasn’t free of conflict and helped create a generation more accepting of the LGBTQ community. 

It isn’t just the ladies of the Buffyverse that challenge gender stereotypes. When, following Tara’s accidental and very unsupernatural death, Willow’s grief plunges her deep into dark magic, it is her childhood best friend Xander—not Buffy, with her strength—that stops Willow from destroying the world in “Grave.” His appeal is an emotional one rather than a logical argument or an exercise in physical strength. Rather than the knight-in-shining-armour swooping in to save the day, Xander uses his relationship with Willow and their history to pull her back from the edge, a tactic that might be considered stereotypically feminine.  

Popular culture doesn’t offer nearly enough feminist role models. Buffy may not be the ideal, but the storylines and characters of Buffy the Vampire Slayer provide a framework for feminist discussions. It’s my belief that public and school libraries—as community centers and sites for education —have the ability to serve as places of consciousness raising about sexism and oppression. Including Buffy-related items in collections and promoting them is a way to contribute to feminist consciousness raising. 

In the final episode of the television series, Buffy poses the question: “Are you ready to be strong?” After seven seasons on television, Buffy the Vampire Slayer the characters represented many different ways to be strong woman or man, regardless of gender.
 
Editor’s note: In a time where we have just had the discussion about ya literature and body image, it is nice to have strong, empowered female characters that remind teens that girls they can be the hero.
 
 
Slayer Scavenger Hunt
 

Did you notice some words written in red in this post? If not, go back and take a look. You’ll want to, I can reassure you. Why? Because we are having a Buffy themed scavenger hunt! How fun is that? To find out how to participate, read the details below. And I know you’ll want to participate because we are working on getting some GREAT prizes lined up for the winners!
  • Write down the words each week (Sept. 8 – Oct. 20), putting them in an order that makes sense. All together these words create a quote from Buffy.
  •  
  • During the last week a form will be made available on all three blogs where you can turn in the quote that you have pieced together.
  • On the last weekend of The Sunnydale Project, Oct. 27, the quote will be revealed! We will then draw a winner from those who have correctly completed the quote.
We really hope you have fun with this! We’re still finalizing the prize, but it’ll be worth participating for! An announcement will be made when all details have been finalized!

Who watches the Watchers? (a guest post by Ashes author Ilsa J. Bick)

For the last two Saturdays, as part of The Sunnydale Project, I have shared with you some of my favorite Buffy read alikes.  Today, I share with you a guest blog post by an author of another amazing Buffy read alike, Ilsa J. Bick, author of both Ashes and ShadowsOne of the key characteristics of our girl Buffy is that she is a strong, independent, kick ass heroine.  And so is Alex, the main character in the Ashes trilogy.  Ashes is the story of “the changed” (the changed become zombie like in that they now eat human flesh, yummy) and Alex’s quest to survive in a new world.  The moment that the change occurs and Alex is spared marks a turning point for our heroine in much the same way that Buffy’s life is forever changed when she becomes The Chosen One, the slayer.  Like Buffy, Alex is reborn and must fight to hold back the darkness, both in the world and within herself.  You can read my review of Ashes (book 1) here and of Shadows (book 2) here.  Today, we’ll let author Ilsa J. Bick tell you why librarians, though probably not technically Watchers, rock!
 
The Changed will grow in numbers.  The Spared may not survive.
The Ashes trilogy by Ilsa J. Bick, published by EgmontUSA

True story: I’m on tour for ASHES, and I go to this school library in Michigan to talk to about two hundred kids.  They’re nice.  Most kids are.  So we’re talking, and they’re into it and so am I—when, all of a sudden, out of the corner of my eye, I see this big, hulking, football kid, call him Brandon, unfold from the depths of the couch where he’s been hiding.  (Really.  The kid was tucked up, head down, arms crossed, legs going in that please-God-get-me-out-of-here jiggle we all know because we’ve all done it.)  Now, Brandon is really huge, neck like a tree trunk, muscles large as cantaloupes, buzz cut.  The kind of boy a football coach would throw his grandmother under the bus to put on the team, know what I saying?  I’m not indulging in stereotypes, really, but given Brandon’s behavior, I know he’d rather have his tonsils taken out with a fork.  Except something snagged him, lured him out of hiding.

So Brandon makes this interesting circuit, walking the perimeter, scoping things out.  Counterclockwise.  (Yes, it’s the geek in me.)  Not quite making like a shark; more like a drone whose operator’s trying to decide if you’re worth the effort.  So I’m still talking, but I’m watching, see, keeping an eye on this kid, wondering what’s going on—when, from the very back, he shouts, “So, like, this book?  There’s survival stuff and an army guy and all that?  Like, and it’s not about vampires and boyfriends and in the future and crap?”   (He didn’t say “crap,” but this is a PG-13 blog.)

So, you know, I said that, no, my book was . . . blah, blah.  What I said really isn’t important.  Here’s what is: the minute Brandon said, “Dude, this is awesome,” and then marched up to sit in the front row.  (And, yes, you could see the heads turn and hear the buzz.)  Brandon even stayed after to talk until the librarian shooed him to his next class.

And here’s what else is important: when the librarian said, “Oh, this is marvelous. Brandon doesn’t read.  I’ve tried so hard to get him interested.  This is the first time I’ve seen him excited over a book.”  Thanked me for getting Brandon jazzed, and the way she said it?  Choked me up.

Now, was Brandon’s sudden interest a testament to my sparkling persona and great delivery style?  Only sort of; I’d like to think it’s the story because what this really speaks to is two-fold: a shared love for story, and a librarian’s commitment to her kids.  One almost never exists without the other because our librarians are often the ones who put the books we come to love in our hands in the first place.  That this woman knew this boy so well and tried so hard tells you, right off the bat, she cares not only about books but each kid.  She knows Brandon, and wants to share what she loves.

The best librarians are like that: people who turn an anonymous place into one where your name is known and you matter.  Where someone hands you a book and says, “I saw this and thought of you.”

Being nominated for a YALSA award is an honor and a thrill, all by itself.  Would I love for ASHES to make the Teen TopTen?  You bet.  But the nomination is also fabulous because it affirms what I truly believe.  What I write, I write out of great feeling and with care for my characters, my craft, the story.  That what I do is valued and becomes a gift?  What writer could fail to be honored?

Brandon . . . Dude, enjoy the read.

Ilsa J. Bick is a child psychiatrist, as well as a film scholar, surgeon wannabe, former Air Force major, and an award-winning author of dozens of short stories and novels, including the critically acclaimed Draw the Dark (Carolrhoda Lab, 2010); Drowning Instinct (Carolrhoda Lab, 2011); Ashes, the first book in her YA apocalyptic thriller trilogy (Egmont USA, 2011) and the just-released second volume, Shadows. Forthcoming is The Sin-Eater’s Confession (Carolrhoda Lab, 2013) and the last installment in the ASHES trilogy, Monsters (Egmont USA, 2013).  Ilsa lives with her family and other furry creatures near a Hebrew cemetery in rural Wisconsin.  One thing she loves about the neighbors: They’re very quiet and only come around for sugar once in a blue moon.
Visit her at www.ilsajbick.com.  Follow her on Facebook or Twitter @ilsajbick.
Slayer Scavenger Hunt
 

Did you notice some words written in red in this post? If not, go back and take a look. You’ll want to, I can reassure you. Why? Because we are having a Buffy themed scavenger hunt! How fun is that? To find out how to participate, read the details below. And I know you’ll want to participate because we are working on getting some GREAT prizes lined up for the winners!
  • Each week on our Slayer Saturday posts look for the words highlighted. There will be 3 sets of words each weekend, so make sure to visit all three blogs (Bookish Comforts, Patricia’s Particularity and Teen Librarian Toolbox).
  • Write down the words each week (Sept. 8 – Oct. 20), putting them in an order that makes sense. All together these words create a quote from Buffy.
  • During the last week a form will be made available on all three blogs where you can turn in the quote that you have pieced together.
  • On the last weekend of The Sunnydale Project, Oct. 27, the quote will be revealed! We will then draw a winner from those who have correctly completed the quote.
We really hope you have fun with this! We’re still finalizing the prize, but it’ll be worth participating for! An announcement will be made when all details have been finalized!

Embrace the Slayer: Embrace by Jessica Shirvington (TheSunnydaleProject)

“It’s time for you to know who you are . . . ” – Jessica Shirvington

Last Saturday I told you about my absolute favorite Buffy readalike, Hold Me Closer, Necromancer by Lish McBride. Today, I am going to share another readalike with you – the Embrace series by Jessica Shirvington (technically called The Violet Eden series).

Into every generation a chosen One is born and Buffy is our girl. She fights. She slays. She quips. But the deal is, she honors her destiny while staying true to the core of who she is. And girl can seriously kick butt.

Meet Violet Eden. She too has a destiny (please note the angel wings on the cover – it is a big hint). She becomes aware of it when strange voices begin to whisper to her. And then there is the matter of a strange tattoo that is appearing on her arm. Violet doesn’t know her destiny when we first meet her, but in some ways she has already been in training for it.

The Violet Eden series begins with book 1, Embrace (read my review here), and continues with book 2, Entice, which just came out this month. They are written by Jessica Shirvington and published by Sourcebooks Fire.


Embrace introduces us to Violet and Linc and a few other interesting characters. In Entice, we learn more about what, exactly, Violet is and what her calling is. It involves a hierarchy of angels, yin and yang, good vs. evil and the battle for the world – you know, Buffy stuff.

Like Buffy, Violet is a strong female character who has to make important choices. Not just once, but over and over again. And like Buffy, there are sometimes HUGE consequences for those choice, including who to love. Destiny is always a tricky business.

When I originally read Embrace, I was bothered by a scene in the book that I felt could be construed as rape and I struggled with how to contextualize it. But Entice helped me to be at more peace with the relationship involved. And a recent discussion about Spike over at Bookish Comforts helped me to remember that even Buffy had scenes that really bothered me but we can’t take them out of context because they are part of a whole story arc. Each new book is a new piece to Violet’s story just as each episode helped us flesh out Buffy and the Scooby Gang’s stories.

I also recently mentioned the cover for Entice in my post regarding ya lit book covers an the influence I feel they have on teen body image. And although I worry about the message of the cover, I reiterated even then that I really like the series.

But here is the really interesting thing about the series, The Mr. is a HUGE fan. When I came back from Midwinter, it was the first arc out of all the arcs I brought back that he chose to read after reading all the back covers. And the same thing happened with Entice. He likes the characters and says they are well developed (they are), he likes the action (it is good) and he likes the Buffyness of it (we are both fans). It just goes to show you, we can’t always predict what guys will like to read.

If you are a Buffy fan, you’ll want to be reading this series. Violet, like Buffy, is an example of a strong female character (a kick-butt girl) who can save the world. Like Buffy, she’ll probably do it more than once. And I am not the only one who has noticed the Buffy vibe to this series, the CW recently announced that it was developing this series into a tv show and the press release called out to Buffy fans. Violet Eden has answered the call to her destiny, you should answer the call to Buffy fans and read this series.

Please note: I already have a great programming idea put together for you with this book series.  You’re welcome.

EMBRACE and ENTICE GIVEAWAY

As part of The Sunnydale Project, I will be giving away my Embrace and Entice arcs by Jessica Shirvington to one lucky winner. Leave a comment with a way to get in contact with you via email or Twitter by next Saturday’s post for your chance to win.

Slayer Scavenger Hunt
Did you notice some words written in red in this post? If not, go back and take a look. You’ll want to, I can reassure you. Why? Because we are having a Buffy themed scavenger hunt! How fun is that? To find out how to participate, read the details below. And I know you’ll want to participate because we are working on getting some GREAT prizes lined up for the winners!
  • Each week on our Slayer Saturday posts look for the words highlighted. There will be 3 sets of words each weekend, so make sure to visit all three blogs (Bookish Comforts, Patricia’s Particularity and Teen Librarian Toolbox).
  • Write down the words each week (Sept. 8 – Oct. 20), putting them in an order that makes sense. All together these words create a quote from Buffy.
  • During the last week a form will be made available on all three blogs where you can turn in the quote that you have pieced together.
  • On the last weekend of The Sunnydale Project, Oct. 27, the quote will be revealed! We will then draw a winner from those who have correctly completed the quote.
We really hope you have fun with this! We’re still finalizing the prize, but it’ll be worth participating for! An announcement will be made when all details have been finalized.