Teen Librarian Toolbox
Inside Teen Librarian Toolbox

Cindy Crushes Programming: Five Thoughts on the (Very Slow) March to the End of the Pandemic, by Teen Librarian Cindy Shutts

At my library, we are all excited about the vaccines hitting our area. I am half vaccinated. I am so excited about what is to come but I know that the pandemic is certainly not over yet. We have new strains popping up around the country and since schools have gone back in session there has been an increase in positivity rates. We also serve a population that can not get vaccinated yet, so we have to be even more careful. How is the process toward in person programming looking at your library? Here’s a look at what we’ve been thinking about as we plan programming for the future of 2021.

Outdoor Programming

We are doing outdoor programming starting in the summer. We are hoping to have our program Dog Days of Summer which is an annual pet adoption event. We will still require social distancing and masks of course. Our children’s department is looking at doing outside messy crafts. We plan to have an outdoor volunteering opportunity during the summer and have teens pick up trash in our courtyard and improve our children’s garden.

My niece Julia and her dog Brock at a past dog days.

Avoiding High Touch Programs

We will still have to avoid programs that are high touch such as crafts where supplies would be shared. I do not have enough scissors for everyone one to do crafts so I plan on avoiding in person craft and continuing doing take and make at my library. Make and Take programs have the added benefit of allowing our teens to do programming on their own time.

Keep an Eye on Infection Rates

As we have learned the positivity rate for Covid can go up at any time. The pandemic is not over just because we are over it. All libraries will have to continue to pay attention to local infections rates and be open to cancelling at a moment’s notice should the need to arise. Patron, staff and community safety should always come first.

Keep Things Online

Not everyone can come to the library. We are going to keep doing online programming forever now. We want to keep our D and D online, since it is high touch and also continue to do digital escape rooms. I plan to keep TAG online for the foreseeable future, because we have learned teens like having a chance to do their volunteer hours at all hours. Not everyone can get a ride to the library and this helps them be able to do their hours without having to get a ride from their parents or guardian. Online programming has made library programming more accessible for a large number of previously under-served patrons.

Find Programs That You Can Do

One program we are thinking about is doing Kahoot trivia in the library. It would be easy to set up in our large programming room and have the teens social distance and have them use their devices such as their Chromebooks or phones to answer the trivia while we project it on our big screen. As we look for continued ways to address the pandemic, we will all have to continue to practice and be an example of best safety practices.

What are your plans for the year? Are you doing in person programming and how are you doing it? Also how are you making it accessible for all patrons? We are trying to balance that many teens have been doing well with a lot of our online programming and we want to keep serving those teens. We have seen this a lot at our Crest Hill Branch which is hard for patrons to get to. We noticed a lot more teens from Crest Hill doing virtual programming. We find we are serving different patrons. What is your end of Covid plan?

Cindy Shutts, MLIS

Cindy is passionate about teen services. She loves dogs, pro-wrestling, Fairy tales, mythology, and of course reading. Her favorite books are The Hate U Give, Catching FIre, The Royals, and everything by Cindy Pon. She loves spending times with her dog Harry Winston and her niece and nephew. Cindy Shutts is the Teen Services Librarian at the White Oak Library District in IL and she’ll be joining us to talk about teen programming. You can follow her on Twitter at @cindysku.

Cindy Crushes Programming: 3 RPG Games I Want to Try on Roll20, by Teen Librarian Cindy Shutts

I recently started to run the virtual Dungeons and Dragons for my library on Roll20. I was so grateful to learn about Roll20 from friends and YouTube videos. I do know there are so many more RPG games that can be played with teens on Roll20.  Here are three cool games other libraries have played.

Learn More: Roll20 101 Crash Course

  1. Masks!: This is a superhero RPG.  Players take the role of the new crop of superheroes and must work together to fight forces of evil. This game looks perfect for teens since the characters are teens.  Normal Library in Illinois ran this on Roll20 as a one-shot.  I think using games as a one shot is super helpful because if the teens enjoy it you can always make it a series.  Here is a link to learn more about Masks! https://www.magpiegames.com/masks/
  2. Call of Cthulhu: This is one of the more popular RPG games. I have had a few of my former coworkers play this with the teens before the pandemic. This RPG is about being an everyday investigator of the unknown. You can be one of many different characters trying to dive into the mysteries that live in the Cthulieverse. Cthulhu, for those who do not know who Cthulhu is, is a monster created by Lovecraft which is often a sea creature that looks like a squid or octopus and has a cult surrounding it. It is one of the more popular monsters. Reed Memorial in Ravenna, OH has been running this RPG using Roll20 doing two hour sessions.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CmTFHSrV5TE&feature=emb_title
  3. Goblin Quest: This is a fun slapstick type RPG game filled with Goblins. It seems very similar in humor and vibes to the popular card game Munchkin. There are missions like saving Dwayne Johnson aka the Rock. The goblins make many mistakes along the way and often die. If you are looking for a non-serious game this looks great. It was started with a Kickstarter.  Normal Library also ran a session of this RPG on Roll20. https://www.amazon.com/Goblin-Quest-Softcover-fatal-incompetence/dp/0996376518

Cindy Shutts, MLIS

Cindy is passionate about teen services. She loves dogs, pro-wrestling, Fairy tales, mythology, and of course reading. Her favorite books are The Hate U Give, Catching FIre, The Royals, and everything by Cindy Pon. She loves spending times with her dog Harry Winston and her niece and nephew. Cindy Shutts is the Teen Services Librarian at the White Oak Library District in IL and she’ll be joining us to talk about teen programming. You can follow her on Twitter at @cindysku.

Cindy Crushes Programming: 10 Tips for Make and Take Crafts During a Pandemic

  1. Use Fandoms: I always try to include fandoms with my crafts. It makes teens be able to recognize that the craft is. Teens will always have their fandoms.
  2. Pick something useful: I have done a lot of light crafts and also this month we are doing handwarmers. It is certainly cold enough for them. We have been in a polar vortex for awhile
  3. Keep costs low: This really depends on your budget. I know a lot of libraries are going through budget cuts including mine. I have been using a lot of the craft supplies I already had. I also have been using sales. I was so excited when Joann’s had a felt sale a couple weeks ago. I also use coupons.
  1. Put a picture on the craft showing what it is: This is so important. Teens will not know what they are taking if you do not display what the craft is.
  2. Make an Example Craft: This is super helpful so teens can see the craft in person and are able to know that it is possible to make
  3. Make the instructions have pictures if the craft is hard: Many teens are visual learners and need to see the steps in the craft. I go through my coworkers craft and look at the instructions and will let them know if I am confused. I figure if I am confused, the teens will be confused.
  4. Make a video for the hard crafts: If you are choosing to do a hard craft, having a video will allow the teens to see your process.
  5. Do not pick very hard crafts: Give teens crafts they can complete and feel good about. Some things are too hard and you do not want to put too much pressure on them.
  6. Do not worry if the craft does not go right away: Sometimes during the pandemic you will not see many teens or their parents. This is okay. Do not stress.
  7. Do not overcraft: I am guilty of this one sometimes. I get so excited about a Take and Make that I want to shove it in a month we are pretty full in. Resist the urge if you can you do not want to bog yourself down with crafts.
  8. Don’t choose super messy crafts: I did this recently when I had a craft with cornstarch. I was covered in it all day. Plus super messy crafts will not make parents happy with their teens doing the craft at home.

Stay Safe during this weather! Here is a picture my dog Harry Winston in winter PJs.

Cindy Shutts, MLIS

Cindy is passionate about teen services. She loves dogs, pro-wrestling, Fairy tales, mythology, and of course reading. Her favorite books are The Hate U Give, Catching FIre, The Royals, and everything by Cindy Pon. She loves spending times with her dog Harry Winston and her niece and nephew. Cindy Shutts is the Teen Services Librarian at the White Oak Library District in IL and she’ll be joining us to talk about teen programming. You can follow her on Twitter at @cindysku.

Cindy Crushes Programming: Programming by Themes, by Teen Librarian Cindy Shutts

Want a hot tip about planning, organizing and promoting programming for teens? I like to take a themed approach, which was my approach even before the pandemic. I would find a theme that appealed to my teens and program around it. In the past, I have done themes such as My Little Pony, Divergent, Hunger Games, Superheroes, Anime, Mythology and so many more. Having a place to start when talking about programming is so helpful, and themes work really well.

When we first started doing pandemic programs, we were honestly just trying to see what worked. If we could find anything that encouraged our teens to use our services virtually or for take and makes we would do it. We learned a lot about the teens we worked with during this just trying anything. We could not do the educational programs that we used to sprinkle in. They did not want it. School was too much. We had to remember that right now a lot of what everyone is trying to do is survive. So we decided to focus all of our programs on fun things. We started to go back to what had worked in the past: themes.

We knew Animal Crossing was popular, so we did multiple Animals Crossing crafts. This was the beginning of the themes coming back for us.

Last month our theme was Dungeons and Dragons. We had the craft, the dice bags created by Linden Galloway. I ran my first campaign on roll20 for the 5th edition Dungeons and Dragons. I also created a Dungeon and Dragons themed escape room. Here is a link to my escape room. https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfKSs-dVCAGiCHR8zBu3y9ubiQiGC3VGt2o8rLbbKQ-cNTVPA/viewform?usp=sf_link

We are now planning our themes out. February is space. We are doing two Among Us sessions, One Among Us escape room using google forms, and an Among Us handwarmer craft we are borrowing from another library, Star Wars trivia, and origami.

Yes, some things do not fit in our themes, like My Woodchuck Revolution escape room that is coming out at the end of February. But I think doing themes makes life easier for us. We always do a craft, a trivia session and an escape room using the theme. These programs are the ones we know work well for our patrons.

As someone who does regular programming, themes make my life easier. I can find out what teens like and plan around them. I am curious what other libraries are doing during the pandemic. Are you using themes or are you just doing a similar schedule of programs that you did in the before times? What themes are popular at your library?

Cindy Shutts, MLIS

Cindy is passionate about teen services. She loves dogs, pro-wrestling, Fairy tales, mythology, and of course reading. Her favorite books are The Hate U Give, Catching FIre, The Royals, and everything by Cindy Pon. She loves spending times with her dog Harry Winston and her niece and nephew. Cindy Shutts is the Teen Services Librarian at the White Oak Library District in IL and she’ll be joining us to talk about teen programming. You can follow her on Twitter at @cindysku.

Cindy Crushes Programming: Make and Take Crafts Including Dice Bags and Magical Lanterns

Dice Bags

This craft my coworker Linden Galloway came up with. It turned out so well. It was one of the fastest Take and Makes we ever had. My branch had theirs go within a day.

Supplies:

Felt cut into a 10 inches in diameter circle with marks 5/8 inch long each, and it must be 1/4 inch away from the edge. This should be put in the kit like this. The teen will make the cuts themselves.  Total of 24 cuts!

  • 20 inch ribbon use a thinner ribbon to make it thread easily.
  • Scissors
  • Sharpie

Instructions for Teens:

All you need is a sharp pair of scissors!

(Fabric scissors preferred)

1. Cut the circle out if not already cut out.

2) Hold the circle in front of you with the lined side facing away from you

3) Fold one edge over slightly so you can see half of one of the lines

4) Snip with the tip of your scissors in the middle of the line, but don’t cut to the edge of the fabric!

5) Unfold, and use the hole you created to cut to the ends of the line

6) Repeat steps 2-5 for all of the lines

7) Take the ribbon and weave it between the holes you created

8) Pull the ends of the ribbon to close your dice bag, tie in a bow, and enjoy! No-Sew Dice Bag

Magical Lanterns

These lanterns were done by my co-worker Faith Healy. We used our cameo Silhouette machine. You could use a cricut machine also. This is an extremely popular craft but does take a lot of prep time to cut all of the patterns. Faith found the patterns she used online.

Supplies:

  • Tissue Paper
  • Cardstock
  • Tea light

Librarian instructions: Find a lantern pattern online and print it out using either the cameo or Cricut machine.

Teen Instructions:

  1. Warning: Be gentle when assembling tissue paper and parts of the lantern are delicate and if you use too much force  it may tear.
  2. Fold along the folding lines. This will make it easier to assemble later.
  3. Use a glue stick (Any glue will do, but glue stick is the easiest and least messy) and glue the back of the lantern.
  4. Trim the tissue paper to the correct size and place the tissue paper firmly on glue side. You may also trim after gluing tissue.
  5. Fold the lantern this time and glue the tabs in place. Place glue on them and press firmly to help stick. There is one side tab and three tabs on the bottom.
  6. Place light in your lantern and Enjoy!

Teen Winter Care Kits

Our teens did not have finals so we gave them winter care kits instead. We included a hot cocoa bag, a candy cane, red and white pipe cleaners to make a pipe cleaner candy and printable snowflake kits. We found the snowflake online. This one does not take much work for the teens but it was a lot of counting and sorting. I did 45 kits. This one you could do with any season like spring you could use paper animal kits like origami, you could do peeps as candy. Find ways to make it fun and find out what your teens want and are interested in it. You could do a kindness rock if you have leftover rock. This is a great take and make to use leftover supplies.

Cindy Shutts, MLIS

Cindy is passionate about teen services. She loves dogs, pro-wrestling, Fairy tales, mythology, and of course reading. Her favorite books are The Hate U Give, Catching FIre, The Royals, and everything by Cindy Pon. She loves spending times with her dog Harry Winston and her niece and nephew. Cindy Shutts is the Teen Services Librarian at the White Oak Library District in IL and she’ll be joining us to talk about teen programming. You can follow her on Twitter at @cindysku.

Cindy Crushes Programming: Random Fandom, a Conversation with Linden Galloway, by Teen Librarian Cindy Shutts

Hello All, I am here with my coworker Linden Galloway. We are going to talk about a fun program Linden came up with called Random Fandom.

We did not have a lot of people the first time but the teens who came were so excited that we want to do this program again!

Cindy: Linden, how did you come up with the idea?

Linden: Everyone has a fandom soapbox to stand on, and I think teens don’t get the chance to share their thoughts often enough. I came up with questions like “What’s your favorite fandom trope?” and “Which character would you most like to cosplay?” to start conversations on fandom with the teens and encourage them to speak their minds. My fellow teen librarian came up with the title Random Fandom for my program idea, and from there I thought it would be fun to randomize the questions by rolling a 20-sided die.

Cindy: I loved how many conversations were started during this program.  I really love talking fandoms with the teens. What fandoms did you think our teens were most interested in?

Linden: Before the program, I thought the teens would be into a lot of fantasy books and shows, since I know the teens at my branch love Dungeons and Dragons. As it turns out, the teens who attended LOVE anime, which is awesome because we have tons of upcoming anime programs that we got to tell them about!

Cindy: My favorite question was what fandom shaped your morals. What were your favorite questions we asked the teens?

Linden: When I asked “What or who got you into fandom?” It was really funny because the teens who attended were siblings, and both claimed to have gotten the other started on anime! I was really excited to ask them “What’s the most underrated/overhyped fandom?” because a lot of people have strong opinions on that topic.

Cindy: What Tips would you give to librarians trying this program?

Linden: Attendance has not been high for most of our programs on Zoom, so if I did this program again I would definitely market it in a more targeted way. There are plenty of places teens who are into fandom might go in person and see a flier, so for a virtual program I would think about virtual spaces where teens might like to find information on Random Fandom.

Cindy: That is so true. It is hard to get teens to zoom. We know there is zoom burnout happening. Thank you Linden for chatting with me.

Program overview: Use a 20 sided dice and answer the fandom based that corresponds with the number on the dice. We had twenty premade questions ready to go. This is a discussion based program.

Cindy Shutts, MLIS

Cindy is passionate about teen services. She loves dogs, pro-wrestling, Fairy tales, mythology, and of course reading. Her favorite books are The Hate U Give, Catching FIre, The Royals, and everything by Cindy Pon. She loves spending times with her dog Harry Winston and her niece and nephew. Cindy Shutts is the Teen Services Librarian at the White Oak Library District in IL and she’ll be joining us to talk about teen programming. You can follow her on Twitter at @cindysku.

Cindy Crushes Programming: Talking Virtual Teen Trivia with Faith Healy, by Teen Librarian Cindy Shutts

Teen Trivia with Faith Healy

One of the most successful teen programs we are running virtually at the White Oak Library District is monthly Trivia. My co-worker Faith Healy has been running it since we started. I asked Faith to explain how we do trivia at the library.

Interview with Faith Healy

Hello Faith, Welcome back. Today we are talking about Trivia with teens. At White Oak Library District we do trivia once a month. How do you pick the theme for trivia?

It varies from month to month on how I pick. The first time we did trivia virtually I did a fandom event which combined a bunch of different questions from different popular fandoms. My secret goal of this event was to gather intel on what fandoms the teens got most correct and filed it for future use. We also collect feedback from our teens in what they would like to do such as Percy Jackson Trivia which we did recently and it was a huge success. Teens really loved it. Other times I pick themes that I am into such as Anime Trivia, which did OK. Not a huge turn out, but those who played loved it, or Hamilton Trivia, another hugely popular one that we had to do a second event as some teens were sad that couldn’t attend on our original date!  I try to stay on top of what teens like and how to make that into a fun trivia event while throwing in a few things I love. I find it easier to make up questions when you love the topic you are working on. I did struggle writing the Percy Jackson Trivia as I only read Trials of Apollo and Heroes of Olympus and not the OG series, but luckily I had an amazing co-worker who had my back and came up with great questions! Trivia topics we have coming up are Broadway, Star Wars, and Animals! We are also considering doing a Witches and Wizards trivia as well in the future.

We use Kahoot. How do you create trivia on Kahoot? What are the pros and cons of using Kahoot?

So Kahoot is great for virtual trivia! We tried a virtual trivia without Kahoot as our first one and ran into issues such as a teen’s sound not working properly, or we couldn’t hear their answers. Kahoot allows them to answer without talking. It lets you do multiple choice answers and true and false, at least for the basic. For the free version it does limit you to max of 10 players as well as the types of questions you have access to. I would love to guess the photo round where it shows a part of the image and increases as time goes on, but that is only in the paid option. So far I had made fun trivia questions with the free option so that is what my library will be using in the future. I would say play around with it and consider if the free version works for you or if you need to shell out the money. Another thing is once Kahoot is playing I don’t have control over the scoring. We had some teens click the right answer, but it did not translate to their score. We did find a work around by giving a free hint for any question they have trouble with to help up their score.

We also use zoom. How does using zoom work along with Kahoot?

Using zoom and kahoot is easy enough, you simply get it ready on your computer and share your screen on zoom. We do have a problem of the teen’s losing connection and needing to pop back in, but we always have 2-3 teen librarians present so someone can run the Kahoot and someone can let teens in when need be. We also experience some lag in which the teens don’t see the questions as fast as they appear. To get around this I have been reading the questions aloud. Other than those issues, teens have been having a fun time using kahoot and zoom. Plus we have been using the chat function to share upcoming events and give out hints.

What are some things you wish you know about running trivia in the beginning of the pandemic?

I wish I know about Kahoot sooner, it does make things easier. Plus when teens like a subject but don’t know an answer it is multiple choice upping their chances of getting it correct. I know I plan to continue to use Kahoot for in person as well as virtual. It is also ok for themes to fail it helps you know what your teens like or dislike. Also that while theme baskets might be fun to make, a gift card appeals more to teens, plus is more cost effective.

What types of trivia work best?

Definitely popular themes work best, Percy Jackson and Hamilton were such popular trivia. We definitely plan to do an all new Percy Jackson in the future given its popularity and Hamilton is why we are trying out a broadway edition which is fun! I also tend to avoid the boring trivia questions like what year did this come out in favor of fun trivia rounds. For example, Percy Jackson, we did Claim the Camper, They had to figure out who was the camper’s godly parent, Guess the God, they are given a vague characteristic of god and had to guess who it describes, Where’s that from? Where we named a plot point and they had to quess if it was from the Olympians, Heroes of Olympus, Trials of Apollo, or the Movie. (Yes it is bad, but some teens might like it). Name that Tune, listen to 20 seconds of Percy Jackson Musical Song and quess the name, turns out not a lot of kids have listen to the musical), and Finish the Prophecy which is self explanatory. Teens have more fun with these rounds and really enjoyed them.

What input are the teens giving about trivia?

They are vocal about what theme’s they want us to try out. The Percy Jackson Trivia attendants even asked to be in an email list for when we do another one. Getting feedback from teens is the best. Also when you make an answer wrong they will call you out on it.

Thank you and Stay safe. Any final tips or tricks?

Don’t be afraid to try new things or themes! Also Kahoot allows sharing of trivia games. After we play a round of trivia, I tend to make mine public for everyone to see. They are a bunch of games already created for you to try, I just really like to make my own. I also add in bonus questions for fun like what is my personal favorite Hamilton songs and for the options I make them all correct. It helps the teens get more points and they get to know you!

Cindy Shutts, MLIS

Cindy is passionate about teen services. She loves dogs, pro-wrestling, Fairy tales, mythology, and of course reading. Her favorite books are The Hate U Give, Catching Fire, The Royals, and everything by Cindy Pon. She loves spending times with her dog Harry Winston and her niece and nephew. Cindy Shutts is the Teen Services Librarian at the White Oak Library District in IL and she’ll be joining us to talk about teen programming. You can follow her on Twitter at @cindysku.

Cindy Crushes Programming: Three Make and Take Programs for Teens, by teen librarian Cindy Shutts

Today Teen Librarian extraordinaire Cindy Shutts has three fun make and take program ideas that would be fun for tweens and teens.

Shrinky Dinks

This is a classic craft. I used to do them all the time pre pandemic but now I realize it is an easy take and make. I am doing fandom Shrinky Dinks. I am including different coloring pages they can trace to make their image.

Supplies:

  • Shrinky Art Paper Kit
  • Sharpies
  • Coloring pages
  • Toaster oven or oven
  • Oven Mitt
  • Scissors
  • Optional: hole punch

Industructions:

  1. Trace your image from the coloring page with a sharpie on the Shrinky Dink page and color it in as needed.
  2. Cut your image from the Shrinky Dink page
  3. Use a hole punch if  you want to make your image a charm.
  4. Turn the oven on to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Please do this craft with parental or guardian supervision. Make sure you have an oven mitt to take the image in and out of the toaster oven.
  5. Place the image on a tray in the oven. Make sure your tray is for oven use. Please use an oven mitt.
  6. Watch the oven for 1-2 images. It should shrink. If  it curls and looks like it will not uncurl, remove the tray with the oven mitt and use the scissors to press down the image.
  7. Please wait to touch this Shrinky Dink until it has cooled.

Bottle Cap Pins

We had Riverdale comics in because we had already ordered comics before free comics book day. So our Crest Hill Branch teen librarian Faith Healy came up with doing a Bottlecap Riverdale Pin to help give the comics away.

Supplies Needed:

  • Bottle Caps               
  • Elmer’s Glue
  • Character Sheet        
  • 2.2 in cloth pins
  • Hole punch for preparing the bottle cap

Here are Faith instruction’s

1. Make your own set of Riverdale Pins or Archie Comics Pins or mix and match. Choose your favorite eight characters to make your pins and cut them out to fit on the bottle caps.

2. Put down a light layer of Elmer’s glue on top of a bottle cap, place your chosen character on the bottlecap. Then place a light layer of glue on top of the character and on the sides. This layer will give the pin a sealing layer to stay nicer longer. Leave them to dry. Anywhere between 30 minutes to 2 hours.

3. Each bottle cap should have two holes punched in it. Open a safety pin and slide in the two holes.

4. Wear the pins, place them on your backpacks. Trade and share with friends.

Fairy Jars

This is a craft I have done many times. In fact last year I was doing one to two jar crafts a month. I loved doing fairy tale images and all different types of fandoms images. Hamilton images were very popular. You can do a theme. I think that works best.

Supplies:

  • Jar
  • Tissue Paper light colors work best
  • Image printed and cut out ot using the silhouette Cameo Machine
  • Glue
  • Tape
  • Accent pieces such as ribbons and buttons and fake flowers
  • Glitter Glue (Optional)
  • Glue Brush
  • LED Tea light

Instructions:

  1. Place your image inside the jar. You can tape or glue the image inside the jar
  2. Place a layer of glue around the jar and then gently place the tissue paper around the jar. Trim off any extra. I am very careful about making sure the silhouette in the jar is not covered by the over fold of the tissue paper. You also want to create a very small part where there are two layers of tissue paper.
  3. Add another layer of glue on top of the tissue paper.
  4. Wait for it to dry
  5. You can use a layer of glitter glue on top if you want.
  6. Add accent pieces. I like to add my accent pieces to the top of the jar. I open the jar so I can see how it will be when I need to replace the light inside or turn it back on.
  7. Turn on the light and place it in the jar.

Cindy Shutts, MLIS

cindy

Cindy is passionate about teen services. She loves dogs, pro-wrestling, Fairy tales, mythology, and of course reading. Her favorite books are The Hate U Give, Catching FIre, The Royals, and everything by Cindy Pon. She loves spending times with her dog Harry Winston and her niece and nephew. Cindy Shutts is the Teen Services Librarian at the White Oak Library District in IL and she’ll be joining us to talk about teen programming. You can follow her on Twitter at @cindysku.

Cindy Crushes Programming: Virtual Programs You Can Do Right Now, Part 4, by teen librarian Cindy Shutts

Teen programming looks a little different for public libraries right now because getting together in groups just isn’t safe so everyone has turned to virtual programming. You can see our previous discussions on virtual programming hereherehere, here and here. Today we have even more virtual programming ideas for you.

Virtual Pet Show

This is a program we are going to do next week. We are excited about this because teen librarians can show off their pets and talk about what makes them special. Patrons do not even need a pet, they can talk about their favorite type of animal if they don’t.

Virtual Price is Right

Earlier this year, I wrote a social distancing version of the Price is Right. We made it a virtual program with a few tweaks and it worked out well. We even were able to use a virtual plinko game my co-worker Faith found. This was one of our more popular programs that we have done.

Virtual Field Trips

This is something I have started to see libraries partner with museums. This helps get more people interested in the museum. This is something I want to try.

Virtual Test Prep

Naperville Public library has been doing virtual ACT and SAT prep. They have hired a local college prep company. This had been one of their more popular in person programs.

An Example from Geneva Public Library District: http://gpld.org/event/4395067

YouTube Tutorials

A lot of librarians are showing off their skills on YouTube from cooking to O’Neal Public Library who are doing a weekly series of Ukulele Tutorials. These videos are super fun to watch.

Cindy Shutts, MLIS

Cindy is passionate about teen services. She loves dogs, pro-wrestling, Fairy tales, mythology, and of course reading. Her favorite books are The Hate U Give, Catching FIre, The Royals, and everything by Cindy Pon. She loves spending times with her dog Harry Winston and her niece and nephew. Cindy Shutts is the Teen Services Librarian at the White Oak Library District in IL and she’ll be joining us to talk about teen programming. You can follow her on Twitter at @cindysku.

Cindy Crushes Programming: Make and Take Kits for Pandemic Programming, by Teen Librarian Cindy Shutts

Today teen librarian Cindy Shutts is sharing with us some Make and Take Kits for pandemic programming.

Oatmeal Foot Scrub

My Co-worker Ariel Nelson and I just did this craft  as a joint take and made sure our whole library district was able to have Take and Make kits. This was a cheaper craft. The price was about  $20 per 60 kits. We did have some of the supplies beforehand. Ariel found the recipe.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons bath salt
  • 2 teaspoons oatmeal
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2-3 tablespoons water

Directions

Mix all the ingredients in a bowl and make a paste.

Apply the paste to your feet and scrub for 10 minutes.

Wash scrub off feet and follow it up with a moisturizer.

The coarse texture of oatmeal, allows for it to be a great exfoliator. It softens the skin of the feet and can even soothe minor rashes and itching. The added ingredients of epsom salt and baking soda enhances the exfoliating effects!

Instructions and other DIY Foot Scrubs found on: https://www.stylecraze.com/articles/diy-foot-scrub/

Here is a video we made https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-DRfOHujuz8&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR0pM30qNnq6szDW2KJSjTrXttROflSq9qZl7N2D2VTgAkSpJdEi358CpjY

Shoe Box Dioramas

This is a great craft to get rid of extra supplies. Ellen Quinn at Rockford Public Library came up with this idea. It is a great way to use shoe boxes and any leftover craft supplies. At Rockford they are sending tweens home with a shoe box and a baggie of craft supplies. When the tweens finish their family can post their diorama and tag the library online. I love this so much. If you wanted to do this in October for teens it would be fun to have a spooky theme like zombies or vampire.

Paracord Bracelets

My Coworker Faith Healy worked on creating 60 kits for our library. Each branch got 20 kits. This one is a really popular craft.  Faith did an amazing job!

Supplies: This is for 60 kits

  • ½ Buckles
  • 12 colors of 50 feet paracord Size 95

Cost: 44.85 per 60 kits not including bags

Here is a PDF of the instructions Faith put together:

Cindy Shutts, MLIS

cindy

Cindy is passionate about teen services. She loves dogs, pro-wrestling, Fairy tales, mythology, and of course reading. Her favorite books are The Hate U Give, Catching FIre, The Royals, and everything by Cindy Pon. She loves spending times with her dog Harry Winston and her niece and nephew. Cindy Shutts is the Teen Services Librarian at the White Oak Library District in IL and she’ll be joining us to talk about teen programming. You can follow her on Twitter at @cindysku