Teen Librarian Toolbox
Inside Teen Librarian Toolbox

Cindy Crushes Programming: Virtual Programs You Can Do Right Now, Part 4, by teen librarian Cindy Shutts

Teen programming looks a little different for public libraries right now because getting together in groups just isn’t safe so everyone has turned to virtual programming. You can see our previous discussions on virtual programming hereherehere, here and here. Today we have even more virtual programming ideas for you.

Virtual Pet Show

This is a program we are going to do next week. We are excited about this because teen librarians can show off their pets and talk about what makes them special. Patrons do not even need a pet, they can talk about their favorite type of animal if they don’t.

Virtual Price is Right

Earlier this year, I wrote a social distancing version of the Price is Right. We made it a virtual program with a few tweaks and it worked out well. We even were able to use a virtual plinko game my co-worker Faith found. This was one of our more popular programs that we have done.

Virtual Field Trips

This is something I have started to see libraries partner with museums. This helps get more people interested in the museum. This is something I want to try.

Virtual Test Prep

Naperville Public library has been doing virtual ACT and SAT prep. They have hired a local college prep company. This had been one of their more popular in person programs.

An Example from Geneva Public Library District: http://gpld.org/event/4395067

YouTube Tutorials

A lot of librarians are showing off their skills on YouTube from cooking to O’Neal Public Library who are doing a weekly series of Ukulele Tutorials. These videos are super fun to watch.

Cindy Shutts, MLIS

Cindy is passionate about teen services. She loves dogs, pro-wrestling, Fairy tales, mythology, and of course reading. Her favorite books are The Hate U Give, Catching FIre, The Royals, and everything by Cindy Pon. She loves spending times with her dog Harry Winston and her niece and nephew. Cindy Shutts is the Teen Services Librarian at the White Oak Library District in IL and she’ll be joining us to talk about teen programming. You can follow her on Twitter at @cindysku.

Cindy Crushes Programming: Make and Take Kits for Pandemic Programming, by Teen Librarian Cindy Shutts

Today teen librarian Cindy Shutts is sharing with us some Make and Take Kits for pandemic programming.

Oatmeal Foot Scrub

My Co-worker Ariel Nelson and I just did this craft  as a joint take and made sure our whole library district was able to have Take and Make kits. This was a cheaper craft. The price was about  $20 per 60 kits. We did have some of the supplies beforehand. Ariel found the recipe.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons bath salt
  • 2 teaspoons oatmeal
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2-3 tablespoons water

Directions

Mix all the ingredients in a bowl and make a paste.

Apply the paste to your feet and scrub for 10 minutes.

Wash scrub off feet and follow it up with a moisturizer.

The coarse texture of oatmeal, allows for it to be a great exfoliator. It softens the skin of the feet and can even soothe minor rashes and itching. The added ingredients of epsom salt and baking soda enhances the exfoliating effects!

Instructions and other DIY Foot Scrubs found on: https://www.stylecraze.com/articles/diy-foot-scrub/

Here is a video we made https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-DRfOHujuz8&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR0pM30qNnq6szDW2KJSjTrXttROflSq9qZl7N2D2VTgAkSpJdEi358CpjY

Shoe Box Dioramas

This is a great craft to get rid of extra supplies. Ellen Quinn at Rockford Public Library came up with this idea. It is a great way to use shoe boxes and any leftover craft supplies. At Rockford they are sending tweens home with a shoe box and a baggie of craft supplies. When the tweens finish their family can post their diorama and tag the library online. I love this so much. If you wanted to do this in October for teens it would be fun to have a spooky theme like zombies or vampire.

Paracord Bracelets

My Coworker Faith Healy worked on creating 60 kits for our library. Each branch got 20 kits. This one is a really popular craft.  Faith did an amazing job!

Supplies: This is for 60 kits

  • ½ Buckles
  • 12 colors of 50 feet paracord Size 95

Cost: 44.85 per 60 kits not including bags

Here is a PDF of the instructions Faith put together:

Cindy Shutts, MLIS

cindy

Cindy is passionate about teen services. She loves dogs, pro-wrestling, Fairy tales, mythology, and of course reading. Her favorite books are The Hate U Give, Catching FIre, The Royals, and everything by Cindy Pon. She loves spending times with her dog Harry Winston and her niece and nephew. Cindy Shutts is the Teen Services Librarian at the White Oak Library District in IL and she’ll be joining us to talk about teen programming. You can follow her on Twitter at @cindysku

Morgan’s Mumbles: 15 Journals to Keep by teen contributor Morgan Randall

In last week’s post, I talked about keeping journals, and I wanted to share a list of ideas of journals to keep to spark ideas of something new for you to start right now. Feel free to mix up any of these in ways that work best for you, as journaling is a super individual practice and should be a very unique experience for each person. (I have inserted pictures of my notebooks, however, know that mine definitely aren’t the “prettiest” ones of these journals, they are practical applications in my life that work. Know that yours can be more creative than mine or far more simplistic, do whatever works best for you.)

Commonplace Book

Commonplace books (or journals) are a collection of quotes you hear, ideas, and random bursts of inspiration. These were mostly kept during the renaissance, but I think that is a thing a lot of people tend to subconsciously compile, be it through notes in our phones or random sticky notes. I personally enjoy keeping quotes that inspire me (and random bursts of inspiration) in its own area so that I always have something to look at when I need inspiration.

Bullet Journal

Bullet Journals can often be intimidating by the large community that surrounds them, personally I love the practice of having one place to collect ideas and create a planner that works for my schedule depending on the week. I have made complicated ones before, but currently, my process is rather simple. I only use a black pen and a few thin markers to color code. I create a calendar (for the year, month, and then weekly setups) along with habit, sleep, and anxiety trackers. This works for me, but feel free to add to it as much as you want.

Diary

I personally do not keep a journal, however, I plan on starting one soon, I know it is something a lot of people benefit from having and enjoy the process every day of having somewhere to reflect on their emotions and the daily events. I also think it is really cool to have a record of your life so that you can always have something to reflect back on to see exactly what was happening in your life (be it mentally or physically)

Dream Journal

This is another one I plan on starting soon because I oftentimes have really strange dreams and I like to look back on them to get ideas or try to decipher what they meant. This kind of journal would be somewhere where you write down your dreams every night (or whenever you have a dream that sparks your interest), and it would help you remember your dreams as well as be able to reflect on them (if that is something you are interested in).

Art Journal

Art journals come in all different forms (as do most journals) some people keep it more as a sketchbook, whereas others use it more as a collection of collages. I do both, depending on my mood, it is an easy way to create without the pressure of impressing anyone else because it is an art just for yourself. Below is a pencil sketch that normally I would have lost the paper to, but having it in a journal allows me to look back on it in case I decide one day to make it into an actual painting.

Travel Journal

This is NOT a journal you should currently be keeping, because you shouldn’t be traveling. But once the world opens back up, and you can safely travel I recommend you log those travel times in a journal where you collect records of events that happened on that trip, ticket stubs, and pictures. This will allow you to have a record of your vacations and be able to easily remember them all. This is also a great place to keep packing lists!

Reading Journal

This is another idea for logging what you are reading, collecting quotes, and writing reviews of books. If you enjoy annotating while you read, this might also provide you with more space to write all your thoughts and ideas out while you read. This can collect your opinions on books, and noteworthy points so if you want to look back to remember your opinion (or maybe an important quote) it is easy to access. This is my reading log (that I started in June), I haven’t updated it but I think it is a good layout if you need an idea for a log.

Writing Journal

If you are an aspiring author, or maybe you just have a lot of ideas and short bursts of inspiration. I recommend keeping a journal of your writings. I have a poetry journal, and one for book ideas. These can include plot structures, studies, character creation, and even actual writing. Let it flow natural and collect important things for your current or future self, while writing.

Gratitude Journal

I keep my gratitude reflection to a line each day in my bullet journal, but if gratitude is something you are consciously trying to work on maybe keeping a journal for it would be best. For some ideas of things to include, I would recommend a daily “Gratitude Log” where you write down the thing you were most grateful about each day, a running list of things that you are grateful for that sometimes you take for granted (maybe this is family, good books, morning coffee, or even just waking up), and (if this is something you can do) just write down everything that happens that you are grateful for. Let this book act as a reminder, when you have hard days, months, or even years that there is always something to be grateful for even if it’s hard to see.

Brain Dump Journal

This journal is exactly what it sounds like, a place to collect notes, ideas, lists, and anything else that doesn’t normally have a place. Let it grow organically and just be a space to get things out of your mind and onto paper.

Time Capsule Journal

My version of this is more of a junk journal. I collect random things from daily life that when put together into my journal form a “Time Capsule” of my life. Personally, my current journal is overflowing. It has random sketches, pictures, receipts, scraps of paper, and random notes given to me by people. This is all “junk” in theory, but I put it in a journal that I can always flip through and remember each moment for each item and lets me be able to easily look back on specific moments.

Food Journal

For me, this is a collection of recipes I have tried (or would like to try) and other random food-related things. These “random things” are nutrition facts, substitutes for items, grocery lists, and even notes about what I am eating and how it makes me feel. I recently went vegetarian and am in the process of going vegan (or at least completely cutting out dairy and only using farm-fresh/locally sourced eggs), so this allows me space to consciously keep track of foods I enjoy and new restrictions I am placing on my diet.

Music Journal

Similar to a reading journal, this is a space to create spreads/collages of songs, albums, and artists. If you enjoy listening to and dissecting music, I recommend keeping a journal like this to create a space for you to reflect on new songs and albums. And allow you to rate them, mark down what you liked and didn’t like, and even how it made you feel. If you enjoy creating music, take this a step farther and include things you enjoy in music and would like to try, along with lyrics that you think of or composition ideas.

Inspiration Journal

This is probably the vaguest, but I recommend keeping a journal of something that specifically inspires you. I have a few journals like this. One is a collection of historical figures that inspire me (and that I wasn’t taught about in school), one is a workout plan/log, and one on sustainability. Create a journal full of things that inspire you.

Philosophy and Theology Journal

This one is slightly more targeted at people who enjoy studying thought processes and ideologies. Create a place where you can collect notes on major philosophers and their thought processes. And if you are religious/spiritual, or enjoy studying those things, extend this into theological beliefs and study the differences between religions and how they have evolved over time. If you are religious/spiritual, you can extend this into a prayer or meditation journal if you are comfortable with it.

Here are some additional TLT posts that you may find helpful in your journaling journey.

Morgan RandallTeen Contributor

Morgan recently graduated high school and is currently enrolled to attend college in the fall getting her BA in Theatre and Dance with an emphasis on Design and Technology. She loves theatre, writing, reading, and learning. But something that has always been important to her is being a voice for those who feel like they don’t have one, and being a catalyst for change in any way possible.

Cindy Crushes Programming: Animal Crossing and the Virtual Library, by Cindy Shutts

Animal Crossing New Horizon is already one of the most popular games ever released. It is super popular with teens and adults. I bought a Switch during Quarantine to play and I have spent over 400 hours playing since. It is a game where you move on to an island and have to build it up along with your house. You will befriend different animal characters who have personality types such as snooty, sisterly, jock and many others. This game  is played much like the Sims but no one dies.  I knew I wanted to do programming around it.

Playing the Game:

One type of programming is playing the game with teens. I got advice from Krista Hutley from the  Wilmette Public Library who told me that using Zoom is the best way to post dodo code. This will prevent people who are not signed up from attending. We had sign-up online and we emailed everyone the zoom link. We wanted to keep our program just teen also to keep everyone safe. I collected recipes in the game and extra items and placed them on my island. I built a mini library on my island so I could pretend to do Storytime and also give RA.

I did have some issues with the program. The library internet could not handle this program. I had tested it before even at work, but I had someone who was my friend come to my island. I did not realize our internet at work was Nat Type D when you need Nat Type A or B. Also one teen had internet issues. Even with the issues the teens had a lot of fun and we were able to talk about how much we all loved animal crossing. With our virtual programming we try to have two librarians attend one to run the program and one to make sure everyone is behaving.

I made a Take and Make Necklace kit using the DIY Recipe Bottle. This was a fun kit and I am enclosing the instructions. This craft looks like it is going quickly.

Take and Make Craft DIY Recipe Bottle

Supplies

  • Jump Ring
  • Mini Bottles that contain Metal Eye Hooks
  • Necklaces
  • Mini Recipe card. I found this online. I just printed them off and sized them to fit in the bottle.

Instructions

1. Take the cork out of the bottle and then place a DIY Recipe Card in the bottle.  Put the cork back in the bottle.

2. Screw the metal hook eye in the center of the cork by hand.

3. You can use your figure scissors or pliers to move to open and close the jump ring. Open the jump ring and place on the metal eye hook.

4. Then take the necklace  in the middle and place it in the jump ring.

5. Close the jump ring.  You now have a necklace!

6. Be careful, the Bottle are made of glass!

Escape Room

I also made an Animal Crossing Escape room. I used google forms to create it. I wrote a story in google docs first. I made it a chose your own adventure. I wrote about 18 pages of text. I had to write the script for every choice they made. This was a lot of fun. I love working on it. I then put it in google forms. I had different pages for different answers. I did realize I had to make the final pages be submit pages so I could record the data of how many people did the escape room. I used this video to help me create the formatting in google forms.

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfSoPUWk82aVrBkxGSGxa7d3hSKiZ5XuOhnKc1HHDLlOZfVrA/viewform?usp=sf_link

Here is the link to try it out. It is being released today!

Cindy Shutts, MLIS

cindy

Cindy is passionate about teen services. She loves dogs, pro-wrestling, Fairy tales, mythology, and of course reading. Her favorite books are The Hate U Give, Catching FIre, The Royals, and everything by Cindy Pon. She loves spending times with her dog Harry Winston and her niece and nephew. Cindy Shutts is the Teen Services Librarian at the White Oak Library District in IL and she’ll be joining us to talk about teen programming. You can follow her on Twitter at @cindysku.

Have Some Doodles, by Teen Contributor Riley Jensen

During this pandemic a lot of people have an excessive amount of free time. It can be hard to find things to do that will fill all that time, so here are some simple doodles that could take up some time. Also, this is an easy programming idea to share because you don’t need a lot of supplies.

Basic Banner:

  1. Draw two squiggly lines with some space between. These lines should be parallel to each other and horizontal.
  2. Connect the two lines at both sides.
  3. At two corners that are diagonal from each other draw a small swirl, but don’t connect the swirl to the line.
  4. The swirls will be connected to the squiggly lines with two straight lines. One at the point where the swirl stops and one where the swirl curves in.
  5. This is the point where you can trace over the banner with a black pen.
  6. Now, you will need two colors that are close to each other. One will be the color of the banner and the other will be the color of the shadow. Color the main part of the banner and the outside of the swirl the lighter color. Color the inside of the swirl the darker color, so it looks like a shadow.

Color Gradient Words:

  1. Get two colors that are close to each other so you can achieve the gradient.
  2. With the lighter color, write out whatever word you want. You may want to make the word a fairly large size.
  3. With the darker color, go about halfway down each letter and go over the bottom half.
  4. Now, you can either leave the word the way it is or you can trace the word however you want.

Separated doodle:

  1. Draw two semi-circles with a good amount of distance between them.
  2. Fill in the semi-circles with the same color that they were drawn with.
  3. Trace the flat parts of the semi-circles with a black pen.
  4. In the space between the two semi-circles write whatever word you want.
  5. Once you have your word you can do whatever you want to it to add flare.

Here are some more doodle examples:

Also, here are some great books about doodling and lettering:

Riley, Teen Reviewer

I am a senior in high school and an avid reader. I have been reviewing books on this blog since 2012. I love musical theatre and listen to show tunes a lot. I also love murder books (both fiction and nonfiction), and she wants to go to college to be a forensic scientist after high school. Reading is one of my favorite things to do, so I must put that hobby to good use for my mom.

Cindy Crushes Programming: Virtual Programming Failures, Tech Issues and Tips, by Cindy Shutts

Since I started doing virtual programming for teens during the pandemic, I have wanted to talk about failure. I think in a lot of ways we are holding ourselves to pandemic numbers. I could have a very full program and it would work perfectly. Now, even if I have people attend there could be technological issues.

It is okay to have a no show program

This is as true before as it is today. Sometimes you just do not get anyone to come. We had a virtual book club and no one showed. It was our first try at having a virtual program. I knew we have to realize we are building a completely different patron base. We have to have teens who have time and access to the internet. I also realized that maybe for our teens virtual book club felt like work. It is hard to want to do anything work at is related right now.

Check your tech equipment where you are running your program

You have to make sure everything works where you run your program because you do not know what the internet capabilities are. This was an issue with my Animal Crossing Program. I had been able to use a dodo code to let people on my island before but our wi fi at work was different than that at my house. I had tested it before even at work but I had someone who was my friend come to my island. I did not realize our internet at work
was Nat Type D when you need Nat Type A or B. Also make sure you can kick out someone if they break patron policy.

Your teen’s internet may be a problem

This issue also happened during our Animal Crossing Program. We had the teens get kicked off the island and we had no idea why. We then realized one of the teens did not have a strong internet connection and the was the cause. It was hard to tell the teen that was the issue.

Give yourself time

We have had two programs with zero people attending. It is okay. We are building back the patron base. They are not going to come back right away. You have to keep trying different programs and see what works. I learned that even though the Animal Crossing program had issues teens wanted to come. I am working on a virtual Animal Crossing escape room and a make and take craft.

Try all different programs

This is the one big thing we have learned about our patron base is that they want to do something fun. It is a stressful time and the programs that have done the best are programs where they did not have to think about work or what is going on in the real world. All library patrons might not want all the same type of programs.

You can see our previous discussions on virtual programming herehereherehere and here.

Cindy Shutts, MLIS

Cindy is passionate about teen services. She loves dogs, pro-wrestling, Fairy tales, mythology, and of course reading. Her favorite books are The Hate U Give, Catching FIre, The Royals, and everything by Cindy Pon. She loves spending times with her dog Harry Winston and her niece and nephew. Cindy Shutts is the Teen Services Librarian at the White Oak Library District in IL and she’ll be joining us to talk about teen programming. You can follow her on Twitter at @cindysku.

Cindy Crushes Programming: Five Virtual Programs You Can Do Right Now Part 3, by Cindy Shutts

Teen programming looks a little different for public libraries right now because getting together in groups just isn’t safe so everyone has turned to virtual programming. You can see our previous discussions on virtual programming here, here, here and here. Today we have even more virtual programming ideas for you.

Volunteering

My Co-Worker Faith Healy came up with allowing the teens to write a blog post about what is going on in their lives during this timer whether they are part of a protest or just dealing with living through a pandemic. This will go on our blog once we have enough posts. We want to encourage teens to use their voice. We will give them a half hour credit for each post.

Online Book Club via Zoom

One of the Teen’s bookshelves of honor.

We are going to have our first zoom book club at the end of the month. One thing we are not going to do is assign a book for our online book club
because we know it would be hard for members to have access to the same book since services are so limited at our libraries right now. We hope to move to having a teen picked reading theme for each month.

TAG (Teen Advisory Group)

We also planned our first district TAG meeting. We hope to get more input into what teens would like to be doing for virtual programs. We will also
give them an hour for community services. For all of our zoom events we are going to require sign up ahead of time for safety so we know who is coming. We want to avoid having an issue. For each of our virtual programs we plan to have two librarians at least so we can monitor the chat for safety.

Trivia

My Co-Worker Faith again has some great ideas. She is making a mini trivia quiz for some of our programs to use as an advertisement such as Animal Crossing and putting a link to sign up for our virtual Animal Crossing event. She is also working on special trivia events we can do as separate programs.

How to Host a Virtual Trivia Night

How to Host a Zoom Trivia Night

Virtual Talent Show

The Plainfield Library is working on doing a virtual talent show.
They are using zoom to coordinate. Teens are going to work on their talent all summer and it will come together in a virtual show at the end of the program series.

How to Host a Virtual Talent Show

Cindy Shutts, MLIS

Cindy is passionate about teen services. She loves dogs, pro-wrestling, Fairy tales, mythology, and of course reading. Her favorite books are The Hate U Give, Catching FIre, The Royals, and everything by Cindy Pon. She loves spending times with her dog Harry Winston and her niece and nephew. Cindy Shutts is the Teen Services Librarian at the White Oak Library District in IL and she’ll be joining us to talk about teen programming. You can follow her on Twitter at @cindysku.

Cindy Crushes Programming: 5 Virtual Programming Ideas You Can Do Right Now, Part 2

With a lot of library teen programming pivoting to virtual for the forseeable future, teen librarian Cindy Shutts has been working on putting together virtual programming ideas that can be implemented quickly. She’s talked about running a virtual Dungeons and Dragons game. And she’s shared ideas like virtual escape rooms and digital art shows in part 1 of this series. Today she’s talking online puzzles and games, including pandemic favorite Animal crossing.

Online Puzzles

Evan Mather at Arlington Heights Public Library worked on doing a virtual puzzle with library teens via jigsawpuzzles.io and it was a blast. The amount of time depends on the difficulty of the puzzle.

Jackbox Games

https://www.jackboxgames.com/games/?fbclid=IwAR0J3X8uSlMxe3lXJmKZ8nr4Hbr-4q_llQk8PD-SUiUQR4nXqc42hvmHQJQ

Tracey Todd Vittorio at The Plainfield Public Library had ten teens come to her first Jackbox program and had the teens asking for more. I would recommend checking the ages on any games you use since some of them can have more adult content than others. Here is a list of their games that come with a filter.

https://jackboxgames.happyfox.com/kb/article/3-are-your-games-family-friendly-what-are-they-rated/

Animal Crossing

A lot of libraries are having their staff develop library islands so that they can do virtual programming through Animal Crossing similar to using discord. This is fun since Animal Crossing is super popular. The downside is the staff would need to have a switch and the game, but if they do it could be a very easy way to program. The staff would issue a one time dodocode so that teen patrons can come visit the island. http://www.ilovelibraries.org/article/visit-library’s-virtual-branch-animal-crossing-new-horizons

Animal Crossing Cindy in her library room

Mario Cart Tournaments

Mario Cart is always a winner for teens and on the switch you can run a virtual tournament. This was a program the Brooklyn Public Library had and it is easy for teens to find because they can search under tournaments for your library’s tournament.

Virtual Volunteer Service

Since my teens get service hours via summer reading and it is looking like many libraries will have limited or cancelled summer reading programs this year finding virtual service opportunities is more important. I have seen a few libraries who have started a pen pal program for teens to write to seniors who are in nursing homes since many of them are not able to see their families. This is a great way to connect and partner with an outside group.

More Virtual Programming at TLT:

Cindy Shutts, MLIS

cindy

Cindy is passionate about teen services. She loves dogs, pro-wrestling, Fairy tales, mythology, and of course reading. Her favorite books are The Hate U Give, Catching FIre, The Royals, and everything by Cindy Pon. She loves spending times with her dog Harry Winston and her niece and nephew. Cindy Shutts is the Teen Services Librarian at the White Oak Library District in IL and she’ll be joining us to talk about teen programming. You can follow her on Twitter at @cindysku.

Cindy Crushes Programming: DIY Shower Melts by Cindy Shutts

I love doing bath and body programs. I based this programming on this recipe.

Aromatherapy Shower Melts

Supplies

  • ½ cup baking soda
  • 1/4 cup sea salt or Epsom salt
  • up to 2 tsp of water
  • Peppermint or lemon 10 drops 10
  • Bowl 
  • Measuring Cups and Spoons
  • Tablecloths
  • Use Food gloves for mixing

Steps:

  1. Mix dry ingredients in the bowl ½ cup of Baking soda and ¼ Epsom salt
  2. Add water slowly and mix. The mixture should stick together but not look wet. Add more water as needed.
  3. Add ten drop of the lemon or peppermint
  4. Move mixture in the plastic conditioner you should have enough for 2-3.
  5. Wait 24 hours for it to Dry

Final thought: This was a great program and when I get back to work I plan to do more programs like it.

Cindy Shutts, MLIS

cindy

Cindy is passionate about teen services. She loves dogs, pro-wrestling, Fairy tales, mythology, and of course reading. Her favorite books are The Hate U Give, Catching FIre, The Royals, and everything by Cindy Pon. She loves spending times with her dog Harry Winston and her niece and nephew. Cindy Shutts is the Teen Services Librarian at the White Oak Library District in IL and she’ll be joining us to talk about teen programming. You can follow her on Twitter at @cindysku.FacebookTwitterShare

Cindy Crushes Programming: Riverdale Escape Room 2

In today’s episode of Cindy Crushes Programming, Cindy Shutts shares with us how she hosted a second Riverdale themed escape room with her teens. You can learn all about her first one here.

To learn more about the basics of hosting an Escape Room, please check out Breakout Edu as they have basic kits that you can use as a foundation. You can also read a couple of previous posts on Escape Rooms here at TLT and online:

TPiB: Build an Escape Room by Michelle Biwer – Teen Librarian Toolbox

TPiB: Locked in the Library! Hosting an Escape Room by Heather Booth

Cindy Crushes Programming: Stranger Things Themed Escape Room

Programming Librarian: Creating a DIY Escape Room for Your Library

Plot: Journey back to Riverdale and help save Jughead and the Southside Serpents from an evil force trying to take over the town. They must the Southside Serpent who only has 45 minutes to be rescued and if he is not saved the Southside Serpents will perish.

Supplies:

  • You could use the Breakout Edu kit
  • 4 number lock
  • 3 number lock
  • Word lock
  • Key lock and key
  • Two lock boxes
  • Southside Serpent signs. I plan on hiding the note on the back of one.
  • Riverdale’s Southside Map (found online)
  • List of Locations
  • Various props I have in my office
  • Props that I made for my last Riverdale Escape Room that I will reuse to be red herrings.
  • Homemade Pop’s Dinner Menu
  • Receipt
  • Fake blue and gold newspaper
  • Maple syrup label
  • Dear Riverdale letter
  • Spellman Mortuary label printed off from my Sabrina Escape Room
  • Fake poster about the dance where Josie and the Pussycats are supposed to perform.

Instructions: I made sure to read the prompt aloud so everyone knew what was going on. I also let them know they had two hints. I am prepared to always add one more hint later on if they need it.

Red Herrings: Homemade Pop’s Dinner Menu, Receipt, Blue and Gold Newspaper, Maple Syrup Label, Spellman Mortuary Label

Word Lock:  Morse Code …  .–. . .-.. .-..  with a Morse Code guide hidden in the room.

4 Number Lock:  The note about the missing serpent will be included in this clue.

Dear Riverdale,

The Serpent of the Southside is mine.  The serpent’s power will die out and so will the serpents. After the serpent dies, three eagles will scream, five wolves will howl and thirty southsiders will die.

Try and Stop me!

The code 3530

3 Number Lock: 465 I plan on hiding a 4 6 5 in the room and color coding the letters. 4 is blue, 6 is Green and 5 is orange. I will also have a list of colors hidden in the room to help find the order. Blue, Green, Orange.

Key Lock: The key will be hidden in the room. It will be in the big box and the lock will be attached to the small box with the snake in it.

Directional Lock: (Up Down Right Left) I found a map of the Southside of Riverdale online and printed a list of locations Pop’s Chock’lit Shoppe, Fox Forest Park, Crystal Lake, Southside High School.

Final Thoughts: The teens really enjoyed this program and had a great time. I had a good number of teens. I had worried Riverdale was over with teens since the newer seasons have had less viewers.