Teen Librarian Toolbox
Inside Teen Librarian Toolbox

Why are Teen Girls the new Sci-Fi Protagonists?, a guest post by Brea Grant

You can’t slingshot a rock right now without hitting a YA book about a teen girl surviving a dystopian apocalypse, discovering her magical powers, or finding a doorway to an alternate land. I’m not complaining but it’s interesting that teen girls are at the front and center of the science fiction/fantasy universe. What is it about the teen girl experience that lends itself to being a protagonist in an otherworldly adventure?

When writing my new graphic novel, Mary, I took a look at Mary Shelley’s personal history and built on it to create my own teen girl protagonist forging her own way and finding a magical world. My modern-day character, Mary, is the fictional descendant of Mary Shelley. She comes from a long line of writers and is expected to become a writer herself. Instead, she discovers that Mary Shelley was not writing about the fictional creature of Frankenstein’s monster but instead was writing a guidebook for her progeny so they could follow in her real footsteps — not as writers but as a doctor to monsters. When my current-day Mary discovers this, she must grapple with what she’s been told about the world and her future choices. It’s coming-of-age magnified.

Struggling with knowing what to do with your life is something most of us can all relate to…even in our mid-to-late 30s (note to self: figure out what you want to do) and beyond. Writing this graphic novel, I felt like I could take my own meandering path regarding my career choices and put it into a magical context and that somehow made it…easier to deal with? Mary could think about her life in a way that I couldn’t because her world was actually as strange as mine has always felt. If the world is actually bizarre, difficult to understand, and magical, maybe she (or myself by extension) wasn’t such a weirdo for not being able to fit into it. If the reason that you are unable to make a decision about what to do with your life is because there are monsters living among us and no one told you about them, maybe you weren’t so wrong to have trouble deciding whether or not to go to college (or insert other major life decision here)!

Mary Shelley herself happens to be an interesting heroine in real life. Shelley can be credited with being the mother of modern day science fiction as we know it. She was a pioneer. What people often forget is that she was only 19 when she conceived of the concept for Frankenstein, on a cold, dark night (true story!). When published, it was so outlandish that a woman would write something horrific that she didn’t put her actual name on its first published editions.

So, like a lot of heroines in science fiction novels, she was a rebel. She didn’t fit into the rules of her day. She had a relationship with a man against her parents wishes and was estranged from them for many years. She wrote and created in an unexplored genre that was unseemly for women. And like many of our modern-day heroines in the aforementioned apocalyptic situations, she forged her own way against the rules that had been set up. We don’t center YA novels around teenagers following the rules and upholding tradition. We center them around pioneering young people willing to take chances and break things. Shelley was definitely one of those. She opened up a magical door that was rarely opened for female writers while under the age of 20. Teen female protagonist for the win.

Being young encourages imagination. I am in the small minority of people who have the privilege of spending most of my days imagining worlds that don’t exist. Between the pull of adulthood, responsibilities and all of the very crushing realities of growing up, somewhere along the way, we lose our ability to just play. Science fiction and fantasy allow us to be imaginative. They allow us to escape — as writers or readers. So it may be obvious that age has a lot to do with the many examples we see of female protagonists fighting monsters, discovering worlds, and ending up winning the day. We associate science fiction — the ultimate place for imagination — with youth. Of course our main characters are youthful. They still are allowed to play.

But that doesn’t explain the choice of young women over young men as sci-fi protagonists. I would make the argument that the monsters/dragons/evil doers are stand-ins for the harsh realities of growing up and the tough decisions young women have to make. The female experience lends itself to the paranormal in the obvious ways our bodies change but also the way in which societal standards morph as we get older. As children, we can run, play and be free to think wildly but as we get older, those things start to be discouraged. A young girl covered in mud is much different than a 20-year-old. Dealing with these standards is like fighting off a demon. It is choosing to stand out and creating an entirely new set of rules. It’s difficult. I think it’s why we are seeing so many interesting trans characters in sci-fi as well. Trans people have known they were breaking societal rules for a long time. They have been fighting these monsters since the day they realized they wanted to wear a dress instead of a soccer uniform. Breaking out of these molds are otherworldly. For a young woman, something as simple as choosing to study engineering is comparable to teen heroine picking up a sword for the first time in an all-male league of dragon fighters. Although different worlds, it takes the same amount of courage to be a young woman who doesn’t quite fit into the mold of what is expected and to continue to push boundaries.

I love that we have these models for young women. It’s hard to be a thing if you can’t see it and we can see these boundary-pushing young women all over YA right now. So, if you’re never fought a monster before, how do you do it? You dive in like Katniss, Emika, Sunny, Starr and the many other teenage female protagonists who are fighting new fights, figuring their way through it, and on the other end, becoming the heroes of their own stories.

Meet Brea Grant

Brea Grant is a filmmaker/writer best known for her Emmy-nominated work on the Netflix series, EastSiders, and her most recent film, 12 Hour Shift, a comedy heist film starring Angela Bettis and David Arquette. It premiered at Tribeca in 2020. A month later, she starred in the horror film, Lucky, which she also wrote, directed by Natasha Kermani, which premiered at SXSW in 2020. Her first comic series is called We Will Bury You, which was published by IDW and co-written with her brother, Zane Grant. She co-hosts a weekly book podcast called Reading Glasses with author Mallory O’Meara on the Maximum Fun Network. She started in the film industry as an actress and has appeared on shows like Heroes, Friday Night Lights, and Dexter, as well as horror films like Halloween II and the recent indie favorite, After Midnight.

Brea online:

http://www.breagrant.com/

https://www.instagram.com/breagrant/

https://twitter.com/breagrant

About Mary: The Adventures of Mary Shelley’s Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Granddaughter

Angsty teenager Mary Shelley is not interested in carrying on her family’s celebrated legacy of being a great writer, but she soon discovers that she has the not-so-celebrated and super-secret Shelley power to heal monsters, just like her famous ancestor, and those monsters are not going to let her ignore her true calling anytime soon.

The Shelley family history is filled with great writers: the original Mary Shelley, author of Frankenstein, the acclaimed mystery writer Tawny Shelley, cookbook maven Phyllis Shelley…the list goes on and on. But this Mary Shelley, named after her great-great-great-great-great grandmother, doesn’t want anything to do with that legacy. Then a strangely pale (and really cute) boy named Adam shows up and asks her to heal a wound he got under mysterious circumstances, and Mary learns something new about her family: the first Mary Shelley had the power to heal monsters, and Mary has it, too. Now the monsters won’t stop showing up, Mary can’t get her mother Tawny to leave her alone about writing something (anything!), she can’t tell her best friend Rhonda any of this, and all Mary wants is to pass biology.

ISBN-13: 9781644420294
Publisher: Six Foot Press
Publication date: 10/06/2020
Age Range: 12 – 18 Years

A Second Self for Self-Acceptance, a guest post by Lillian Clark

Thank you so much to Teen Librarian Toolbox for hosting this post! My name is Lillian Clark, and I’m the author of Immoral Code and the newly released Half Life, which follows Lucille Harper, an “over-achiever” who signs up to a beta tester for a secretive company finalizing plans to manufacture made-to-order human clones.

Lucille is ambitious. And hard-working. And determined. The problem is that she’s all of those things but…for what? Ever since the first time she went a little above and beyond, she’s been labeled an “overachiever,” a term she takes fundamental issue with. And one she’s not really sure she lives up to. The truth is, she’s been chasing external expectations for so long that she’s not really sure who she actually is, what she actually wants, or why she’s trying so hard.

As she grows farther apart from her childhood best friend, goes continually unnoticed by her crush, and learns that her seemingly perfect, seemingly happy parents are getting a divorce, she’s approached by Life2, a biotech company offering her the “opportunity of a lifetime.”

Do more. Be more, says their slogan, and Lucille feels it resonate inside her heart.

Because while Lucille turns to near-future science-fiction to “solve” her problems (which, of course, only makes them worse), her worries are ones I think many readers will identify with. They’re certainly ones I identify with. Which is why I wrote Lucille, Lucy, and their plight at all.

At the center of Half Life are a few big questions. Ones like, what does it mean that truth and memory are subjective? And, what constitutes individuality anyway? Plus, how do you accept yourself when you feel like you’re never quite measuring up?

This last one is the driving force behind most of Lucille’s decisions. She feels like no matter how hard she tries, she’s always falling short. While this is personal for Lucille, it’s also something I’ve struggled with myself. And something that, I believe, goes beyond our private expectations for ourselves to those of society.

This is true, likely, for all people, but I think it’s especially so for teen girls. And, unfortunately, ridiculously, those expectations are frequently oxymoronic. As Lucille discusses in the book:

When I think of myself, it’s with a prevailing sense of fear. Fear of inadequacy, of looking foolish, of being too much or too little. Fear of not doing something, anything, everything right.

 I resent it. That omnipresent sense of judgment. Feeling like I could do it all “right” yet still be wrong. Be ambitious, but don’t try too hard. Be capable, but not intimidating. Be attentive, but not clingy. Be aloof, but not unattainable. Be feminine, but not too girly. Be “one of the boys,” but not better. Fast, but not faster. Smart, but not smarter. Funny, but not funniest. Be cute. Be sexy. Be fun. Be likeable.

 As Lucille and Lucy learn, the moral of the story is that those expectations are, so often, a farce. A trap. A box to keep us stuck inside. Lucille has spent her life pushing herself to achieve an idea of perfection that’s inherently false. She’s defined her sense of success by a finish line that is continuously shifting and is, therefore, impossible to reach. Lucy faces something similar though more distilled. As a clone, what does it mean to exceed expectations? Especially when doing so makes you a threat to the people who created you?

Rooted in the action and drama of a story about cloning is a question about individuality and inherent worth, the fact that your circumstances and achievements and context don’t determine your value because, as I say in Half Life’s dedication: “You’re already worth it. You’re already enough.”

Meet Lillian Clark

Photo credit: Rebecca Vanderhorst

Lillian Clark, a graduate of the University of Wyoming, grew up riding horses, climbing trees, hiking, and going on grand imaginary adventures in the small-town West. She’s worked as a lifeguard, a camp counselor, and a Zamboni driver, but found her eternal love working as a bookseller at an independent bookstore in historic downtown Laramie, WY. Now living with her husband, son, and two giant dogs in the Teton Valley of Idaho, she spends her snowy winters and sunny summers reading almost anything and writing books for teens.

Twitter: @lillianjclark

Instagram: @lillianclarkauthor

About Half Life

An overachiever enrolls in an experimental clone study to prove that two (of her own) heads are better than one in this fast-paced, near-future adventure that’s Black Mirror meets Becky Albertalli.

There aren’t enough hours in the day for Lucille—perfectionist, overachiever—to do everything she has to do, and there certainly aren’t enough hours to hang out with friends, fall in love, get in trouble—all the teenage things she knows she should want to be doing instead of preparing for a flawless future. So when she sees an ad for Life2: Do more. Be more, she’s intrigued.

The company is looking for beta testers to enroll in an experimental clone program, and in the aftermath of a series of disappointments, Lucille is feeling reckless enough to jump in. At first, it’s perfect: her clone, Lucy, is exactly what she needed to make her life manageable and have time for a social life. But it doesn’t take long for Lucy to become more Lucy and less Lucille, and Lucille is forced to stop looking at Lucy as a reflection and start seeing her as a window—a glimpse at someone else living her own life, but better. Lucy does what she really wants to, not what she thinks she should want to, and Lucille is left wondering how much she was even a part of the perfect life she’d constructed for herself. Lucille wanted Lucy to help her relationships with everyone else, but how can she do that without first rectifying her relationship with herself?

ISBN-13: 9780525580508
Publisher: Random House Children’s Books
Publication date: 06/09/2020
Age Range: 12 – 17 Years

Water, water, everywhere, a guest post by London Shah

Designing my own functioning submerged world proved the most challenging, indulgent, and creative journey I’ve ever taken. Bringing a long dreamt about world into being proved more satisfying than I could ever have envisioned. World-building is definitely challenging though, and you must be prepared to put in a significant amount of time and energy. Whilst your imagination gets to run wild, your every decision must remain plausible. I feel these limitations only push you further creatively though, and should never be a deterrent in building your vision. To fully grasp how London might function in conditions that appear implausible to us now, I had to consider and research extensively.  

There were several time-consuming stages to approaching how our world could function after an event as staggering as cataclysmic worldwide flooding. I began by looking at our society today and considering how each aspect might evolve by 2035 (date of the floods). I had to then understand how we might approach the sudden news of impending worldwide flooding, a disaster so catastrophic it would leave any survivors submerged deep beneath the waves. The challenges posed by such a drastically different environment would be pervasive and every aspect of society would need examining.  

There is of course the basic infrastructure of the city to consider—homes, civil buildings, energy, food production, transport, et cetera. And specific civil services to ponder, such as law and order. How would a police force operate deep undersea—would holding cells and prisons still be feasible? Would providing an education outside of the home be worth the trouble of getting our children into submersibles and out there every day? Were there currently any scientific and technological predictions for the future that might render hospitals unnecessary? The advancements in technologies would no doubt replace many of our current civil services.  

How might such cataclysmic change affect our psyche? There’s no precedent for transformation on such a scale for humanity, and so I had to seriously consider how such a change could potentially impact our well-being. A change that is expounded by my story world’s obsession with everything Old-World (pre-floods). I came to the conclusion it wouldn’t be improbable for many of us to suffer from some sort of malaise specific to this particular situation. 

What about our faith and beliefs in the face of such a shocking event? I had to consider how such monumental change might affect them, how they might shift and in which direction. Would the new world bring rise to new religions? It’s highly unlikely that a global change on such a scale would not have any lasting impact on our philosophical outlooks. 

Language is constantly evolving, and naturally it would soon also reflect the environment. I had great fun adapting current phrases and creating new ones to express both the setting, and our love for indulging in nostalgia. I believe we’re living in an age of extreme nostalgia, engaging in it in all areas and more than ever before. The past is familiar and a safe place, yes. But we also live in a society where what we wore last season is now already “vintage”, and astonishingly nostalgia is often created around events and pop culture while we’re still experiencing them. And in my story world, as it very often is in the real one, our tendency for nostalgia is used as a tool by those who seek control. While we’re busy looking back though, time only moves forward. 

At first our most basic needs would take priority. But eventually, as history shows, even in the direst of situations and settings we gradually adapt, thinking up ever-inventive ways in which to makes the best of things, to survive. I imagine in time we would relax a little, and gradually evolve into fully functioning societies. We would discover new ways to enjoy the arts, keep connected, and partake in leisure activities. This is reflected in my story as it’s set several decades after the global change. 

Most of my research, at least two thirds of it, was conducted online, on scientific websites and countless forums that discuss and predict future technologies. I also watched a never-ending stream of underwater documentaries, turned to oceanic encyclopaedias, chatted with marine biologists and oceanographers, discussed specific scientific ideas with research scientists, and contacted companies designing and manufacturing deep-sea vehicles. I was even very kindly taken through a mini submersible driving tutorial on Skype. And throughout it all I gained a new admiration and respect for all SFF writers—most especially anyone working in science-fiction. Science will always both fascinate and absolutely frustrate me no end. I’m totally hopeless with it—especially technology. And the sheer amount you have to grapple with in sci-fi is mind-boggling. So yes, I’m more in awe of science-fiction writers than ever before. But without the slightest doubt, building a world is an overwhelmingly thrilling journey to take, and a deeply satisfying one to complete.  

To anyone who has ever entertained the idea of creating their own world or re-imagining our current one, but never quite took that first step, I say go forth and bring your world to life. See any limitations as creative challenges, and enjoy discovering ways around them. And above all, have as much fun as you can with it!

Meet London Shah

Debut author London Shah is a British-born Muslim of Pashtun ethnicity. She lives in London, via England’s beautiful North. If she could have only one super power, it would be to breathe underwater. She is the absolute worst at providing a bio. 

 GOODREADS: http://bit.ly/GoodreadsLight 

WEBSITE: https://www.londonshah.com 

SOCIAL: https://twitter.com/London_Shah

https://www.instagram.com/london.shah/ 

BUY LINKS: http://bit.ly/INDIEBOUNDLight

http://bit.ly/BARNESNOBLELight

http://bit.ly/AMAZONUSLight

About THE LIGHT AT THE BOTTOM OF THE WORLD

ARTIST: MIKE HEATH
DESIGNER: MARCI SENDERS


In the last days of the twenty-first century, sea creatures swim through the ruins of London. Trapped in the abyss, humankind wavers between fear and hope-fear of what lurks in the depths around them, and hope that they might one day find a way back to the surface.

When sixteen-year-old submersible racer Leyla McQueen is chosen to participate in the city’s prestigious annual marathon, she sees an opportunity to save her father, who has been arrested on false charges. The Prime Minister promises the champion whatever their heart desires. But the race takes an unexpected turn, forcing Leyla to make an impossible choice.

Now she must brave unfathomable waters and defy a corrupt government determined to keep its secrets, all the while dealing with a guarded, hotheaded companion she never asked for in the first place. If Leyla fails to discover the truths at the heart of her world, or falls prey to her own fears, she risks capture-or worse. And her father will be lost to her forever.

ISBN-13: 9781368036887
Publisher: Disney Press
Publication date: 10/29/2019
Series: Light the Abyss

Book Review: The Apocalypse of Elena Mendoza by Shaun David Hutchinson

Publisher’s description

From the critically acclaimed author of We Are the Ants and At the Edge of the Universe comes a mind-bending, riveting novel about a teen who was born to a virgin mother and realizes she has the power to heal—but that power comes at a huge cost.

Sixteen-year-old Elena Mendoza is the product of a virgin birth.

This can be scientifically explained (it’s called parthenogenesis), but what can’t be explained is how Elena is able to heal Freddie, the girl she’s had a crush on for years, from a gunshot wound in a Starbucks parking lot. Or why the boy who shot Freddie, David Combs, disappeared from the same parking lot minutes later after getting sucked up into the clouds. What also can’t be explained are the talking girl on the front of a tampon box, or the reasons that David Combs shot Freddie in the first place.

As more unbelievable things occur, and Elena continues to perform miracles, the only remaining explanation is the least logical of all—that the world is actually coming to an end, and Elena is possibly the only one who can do something about it.

Amanda’s thoughts

elenaFact: I really enjoy Hutchinson’s books. You can read my reviews of At the Edge of the Universe, We Are the Ants, Violent EndsThe Five Stages of Andrew Brawley, and Feral Youth to see why. I love his books because they so often deal with mental health and loss and large, weird science fiction ideas about worlds ending.

Florida teenager Elena Mendoza has always been unique. She’s the first and only documented case resulting from human parthenogenesis. Being virgin-born has always made her stand out, but that’s nothing compared to the attention she receives when it turns out she can perform healing miracles. When she witnesses Freddie, the girl she has a crush on get shot, the mermaid from the Starbucks logo tells Elena to heal Freddie. Healing Freddie also appears to rapture the shooter, who disappears in a beam of light. It’s all rather shocking and confusing to Elena, who has always heard voices from inanimate objects, but never knew she could do things like heal others. Her mother suggests she keep her down after this, act like doesn’t know what happened and that she can’t perform miracles. But how do you just forget what you were able to do and move on?

After Elena confirms she really can heal people (unsurprisingly, it’s a little hard for her to just accept what happened), things grow far more complicated than she could have anticipated. The voices (coming from such places as a girl on a tampon box, a My Little Pony, a skeleton, and more) tell her she needs to heal as many people as possible. And on the surface, that seems like a good idea. But for every healing she does, people are raptured—and not just in some 1:1 ration; literally hundreds of people could go missing for each healing. Suddenly, Elena has BIG questions to grapple with. Can she help someone right in front of her knowing others will disappear to an unknown place? Is she being used? Do things happen for a reason or do they just happen? Does nothing matter? Does anything matter? Does EVERYTHING matter? How are things connected? Are people even worth saving (that question will sound familiar to fans of Hutchinson)? Does healing people fundamentally change them? Why should you decide who or what matters? It’s heavy philosophical stuff, which readers of Hutchinson will have come to expect.

As always, Hutchinson populates his story with a diverse group of characters. Elena is Cuban American and bisexual. Her best friend, Fadil, is Mulim and possibly aromatic and/or asexual (he’s still figuring it out). The big picture themes include mental health/suicidal ideation (and actual suicide), bullying, identity, supportive relationships, and how your choices change you and the world around you. Hutchinson superfans will be thrilled to see cameos of characters from his previous books. This look at making impossible choices and handling moral conflict is already one of my favorites for 2018 (and, as of writing this, I’m still back here in 2017). Riveting, thoughtful, weird, brilliant, provocative, and heavy—just what I have come to expect from Hutchinson. 

 

Review copy courtesy of the publisher and Edelweiss

ISBN-13: 9781481498548
Publisher: Simon Pulse
Publication date: 02/06/2018

Take 5: Time Travel and Teens, featuring INVICTUS by Ryan Graudin

We are HUGE Doctor Who fans in my house, and many of my teens are as well. So I’m always excited to read a new Time Travel book. So today I am going to review Invictus by Ryan Graudin and share with you a few of my other favorite time travel books for lovers of Doctor Who (or anyone really).

tltbutton2

Invictus by Ryan Graudin

timetravels1Publisher’s Book Description

Time flies when you’re plundering history.

Farway Gaius McCarthy was born outside of time. The son of a time-traveling Recorder from 2354 AD and a gladiator living in Rome in 95 AD, Far’s birth defies the laws of nature. Exploring history himself is all he’s ever wanted, and after failing his final time-traveling exam, Far takes a position commanding a ship with a crew of his friends as part of a black market operation to steal valuables from the past.

But during a heist on the sinking Titanic, Far meets a mysterious girl who always seems to be one step ahead of him. Armed with knowledge that will bring Far’s very existence into question, she will lead Far and his team on a race through time to discover a frightening truth: History is not as steady as it seems.

Coming September 26, 2017 from Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

Karen’s Thoughts

This is a fantastic book: Exciting, twisty and compelling. Just when I thought to myself, yeah but why does the adventurous time traveler have to be a dude, Graudin inserts some new twists. In fact, this is far more than a time travel book but I can’t tell you why because then it would spoil everything which would make you hate me because where this novel goes is really interesting and fresh. There is also great characterization and growth. On top of all of that, there are some really good relationships here which I appreciated. This is a must buy and read.

The Girl from Everywhere by Heidi Heilig

timetravels2Publisher’s Book Description

Nix has spent her entire life aboard her father’s ship, sailing across the centuries, across the world, across myth and imagination.

As long as her father has a map for it, he can sail to any time, any place, real or imagined: nineteenth-century China, the land from One Thousand and One Nights, a mythic version of Africa. Along the way they have found crewmates and friends, and even a disarming thief who could come to mean much more to Nix.

But the end to it all looms closer every day.

Her father is obsessed with obtaining the one map, 1868 Honolulu, that could take him back to his lost love, Nix’s mother. Even though getting it—and going there—could erase Nix’s very existence.

For the first time, Nix is entering unknown waters.

She could find herself, find her family, find her own fantastical ability, her own epic love.

Or she could disappear.

Karen’s Thoughts

This is such a great series. That’s right, it’s the first book in a series so there is more than one book to keep you traveling in time.

Hourglass by Myra McEntire

timetravels3Publisher’s Book Description

One hour to rewrite the past…

For seventeen-year-old Emerson Cole, life is about seeing what isn’t there: swooning Southern Belles; soldiers long forgotten; a haunting jazz trio that vanishes in an instant. Plagued by phantoms since her parents’ death, she just wants the apparitions to stop so she can be normal. She’s tried everything, but the visions keep coming back.

So when her well-meaning brother brings in a consultant from a secretive organization called the Hourglass, Emerson’s willing to try one last cure. But meeting Michael Weaver may not only change her future, it may also change her past.

Who is this dark, mysterious, sympathetic guy, barely older than Emerson herself, who seems to believe every crazy word she says? Why does an electric charge seem to run through the room whenever he’s around? And why is he so insistent that he needs her help to prevent a death that never should’ve happened?

Karen’s Thoughts

Honestly, I will take any chance I can to recommend this book series. If you haven’t read it yet, I highly recommend it.

Passenger by Alexandra Bracken

timetravels4Publisher’s Book Description

Passage, n.
i. A brief section of music composed of a series of notes and flourishes.
ii. A journey by water; a voyage.
iii. The transition from one place to another, across space and time.

In one devastating night, violin prodigy Etta Spencer loses everything she knows and loves. Thrust into an unfamiliar world by a stranger with a dangerous agenda, Etta is certain of only one thing: she has traveled not just miles but years from home. And she’s inherited a legacy she knows nothing about from a family whose existence she’s never heard of. Until now.

Nicholas Carter is content with his life at sea, free from the Ironwoods—a powerful family in the colonies—and the servitude he’s known at their hands. But with the arrival of an unusual passenger on his ship comes the insistent pull of the past that he can’t escape and the family that won’t let him go so easily. Now the Ironwoods are searching for a stolen object of untold value, one they believe only Etta, Nicholas’ passenger, can find. In order to protect her, he must ensure she brings it back to them—whether she wants to or not.

Together, Etta and Nicholas embark on a perilous journey across centuries and continents, piecing together clues left behind by the traveler who will do anything to keep the object out of the Ironwoods’ grasp. But as they get closer to the truth of their search, and the deadly game the Ironwoods are playing, treacherous forces threaten to separate Etta not only from Nicholas but from her path home… forever.

Karen’s Thoughts

This is another great series that time travel fans will love.

Cold Summer by Gwen Cole

timetravels5Publisher’s Book Description

Today, he’s a high school dropout with no future.
Tomorrow, he’s a soldier in World War II.

Kale Jackson has spent years trying to control his time-traveling ability but hasn’t had much luck. One day he lives in 1945, fighting in the war as a sharpshooter and helplessly watching soldiers—friends—die. Then the next day, he’s back in the present, where WWII has bled into his modern life in the form of PTSD, straining his relationship with his father and the few friends he has left. Every day it becomes harder to hide his battle wounds, both physical and mental, from the past.

When the ex-girl-next-door, Harper, moves back to town, thoughts of what could be if only he had a normal life begin to haunt him. Harper reminds him of the person he was before the PTSD, which helps anchor him to the present. With practice, maybe Kale could remain in the present permanently and never step foot on a battlefield again. Maybe he can have the normal life he craves.

But then Harper finds Kale’s name in a historical article—and he’s listed as a casualty of the war. Kale knows now that he must learn to control his time-traveling ability to save himself and his chance at a life with Harper. Otherwise, he’ll be killed in a time where he doesn’t belong by a bullet that was never meant for him.

Karen’s Thoughts

I haven’t read this one yet but Eric Smith recommends it and that’s good enough for me.

And a Bonus Title . . .

If you can, be sure and get your hands on the much older YA title MR. WAS by Pete Hautman.

mrwasJack Lund figures a good day is when his dad’s too drunk to beat up his mom.

For Jack, Bogg’s End is the end. The end of the turbulent, see-saw years of watching his father go on the wagon and fall right back off gain. Once it took two years, but the inevitable inevitably happened. Now it’s just Jack and his mom starting over in the strange old house his grandfather left them.

But the ride’s not over yet. Jack’s father returns, full of apologies and promises, and for a little while, things are looking up. Then in one terrifying, sickening moment, everything comes crashing back down again.

So Jack runs. He runs through a strange hidden door that takes him back in time to before his parents were born. Before he was born. Maybe with a second chance he can stop the inevitable. At least he’s got to try. What Jack doesn’t understand, though, is that he can’t change his future until he faces his past.

More Time Travel YA Lists

Book Review: At the Edge of the Universe by Shaun David Hutchinson

Publisher’s description

at-the-edgeFrom the author of We Are the Ants and The Five Stages of Andrew Brawley comes the heartbreaking story of a boy who believes the universe is slowly shrinking as things he remembers are being erased from others’ memories.

Tommy and Ozzie have been best friends since the second grade, and boyfriends since eighth. They spent countless days dreaming of escaping their small town—and then Tommy vanished.

More accurately, he ceased to exist, erased from the minds and memories of everyone who knew him. Everyone except Ozzie.

Ozzie doesn’t know how to navigate life without Tommy, and soon he suspects that something else is going on: that the universe is shrinking.

When Ozzie is paired up with new student Calvin on a physics project, he begins to wonder if Calvin could somehow be involved. But the more time they spend together, the harder it is for him to deny the feelings developing between them, even if he still loves Tommy.

But Ozzie knows there isn’t much time left to find Tommy—that once the door closes, it can’t be opened again. And he’s determined to keep it open as long as it takes to get his boyfriend back.

 

Amanda’s thoughts

It’s a well-established fact that I love everything Shaun David Hutchinson writes. I make myself read through my TBR pile in order of publication date, or I’d never be able to keep any kind of handle on it, but knowing this book was sitting there for months was taunting me. I burned through this and when I was done, all I could think about was how jealous I was of all the grad students who will enjoy sitting down to write long papers on the common ideas and symbols in Hutchinson’s brilliant books.

 

Ozzie’s boyfriend Tommy disappeared a few months ago. He didn’t run away—he literally disappeared. No one has any memory of him. But Ozzie remembers everything. He’s determined to wait for Tommy to reappear, even if that means giving up his future to stick around in his small hometown. He’d search for him, but most of Ozzie’s theories about where Tommy went involve quantum physics, so it seems dauntingly impossible to even begin to look for him. Then there’s the whole issue of the universe shrinking. Stars, the sun, the moon—they all disappear. The land beyond Florida disappears. Eventually, everything beyond Ozzie’s small town disappears. No one but Ozzie notices. They can’t. They have no memory of there ever being anything different—no memory of stars, or other states, or space exploration. History rewrites itself to adjust for all these changes. It’s terrifying and depressing. Any chance Ozzie had a creating a life beyond his tiny town is disappearing. Imagine being a teenager whose life has shrunk down to just his high school and the people in his town. Terrifying, indeed.

 

Of course, life goes on, despite these outrageous changes. Despite the many changes in the universe, nothing seems to change the fact that Ozzie’s parents are getting divorced. Or that his brother, Warren, is joining the Army. While he tries to figure out what is happening, Ozzie still hangs out with Lua, his genderfluid rock-star-in-the-making best friend (who goes by whatever pronoun best fits how she is dressed for the day). He still has work at the bookstore (where he repeatedly interacts with Tommy’s mother, who of course has no memory of there ever being a Tommy). Ozzie still has school, where he gets paired up for a project with Calvin, a mysterious and depressed classmate who used to be the king of everything at school. As Ozzie gets to know Calvin, he becomes the keeper of Calvin’s dark secrets and grapples with what to do with this information.

 

Once again, Hutchinson has created an incredibly smart, weird, complex, and deeply affecting look at teenage lives. While they might not spend nearly as much time as Ozzie thinking about quantum physics, most teenagers will be able to relate to the fear and uncertainty that comes with facing a changing and unpredictable future, as well as the claustrophobia of feeling like you have no choices. A mind-bendingly fantastic examination of life, loss, risk, and perception.

 

Review copy courtesy of the publisher and Edelweiss

ISBN-13: 9781481449663

Publisher: Simon Pulse

Publication date: 02/07/2017

2015 Debut Author Bash: Meet ZEROBOXER Author Fonda Lee (and a book giveaway)

2015-debut-authors-bash
Today we are excited to be a part of the 2015 Debut Author Bash hosted by YAReads. You can see the complete schedule here. I was very honored to interview debut author Fonda Lee. Her novel, Zeroboxer, is a Science Fiction thriller set in a futuristic sports arena. Zeroboxing is a weightless combat sport.

 

About ZEROBOXER

zeroboxerA Sci-Fi Thrill Ride Set in the Action-Packed Sports Arena of the Future A rising star in the weightless combat sport of zeroboxing, Carr “the Raptor” Luka dreams of winning the championship title. Recognizing his talent, the Zero Gravity Fighting Association assigns Risha, an ambitious and beautiful Martian colonist, to be his brandhelm––a personal marketing strategist. It isn’t long before she’s made Carr into a popular celebrity and stolen his heart along the way.

As his fame grows, Carr becomes an inspirational hero on Earth, a once-great planet that’s fallen into the shadow of its more prosperous colonies. But when Carr discovers a far-reaching criminal scheme, he becomes the keeper of a devastating secret. Not only will his choices place everything he cares about in jeopardy, but they may also spill the violence from the sports arena into the solar system.

 

The Fonda Lee Interview

Fonda Lee, author of the YA Science Fiction debut Zeroboxer

Fonda Lee, author of the YA Science Fiction debut Zeroboxer

Not book related, but I read online that you are involved in the martial arts. My 13-year-old daughter just got her black belt in Tae Kwon Do. How did you get involved in the martial arts and what has it meant to you? (I’m totally sharing your answer with my daughter)

Besides being a writer, being a martial artist is a core part of my identity. I have a second degree black belt in karate and a black belt in kung fu, which is what I primarily train in these days. I took up martial arts when I was 13 years old (so your daughter already has a leg up on me!). Martial arts is like writing: both require a lot of discipline, perseverance, and relentless focus on improvement of technique. Also like writing, martial arts is something that gets into your blood. Once it’s a part of you, you can’t *not* do it.

Can you tell us a little bit about your journey as a writer?

I’ve wanted to be a writer since I was about ten years old. I wrote a 300 page novel on lined paper while riding the school bus for 45 minutes each way to and from school in fifth grade. I wrote my second in high school during biology class. I wrote fanfiction in college while studying toward… a degree in finance.

After more than a decade of having a practical, lucrative, all consuming career as a corporate strategist, I hit a point where I decided that if I didn’t make time in my life for what I truly wanted to do (write novels) then it wasn’t going to happen. In 2011, I cut back on my work hours dramatically and started writing with the goal of being published. I landed my agent and first book deal at the end of 2013 with the second book I wrote.

How would you describe your book in a 6 Word Sentence?

Zero-gravity prizefighting amid interplanetary conflict.

What would you like for readers to take away from Zeroboxer?

I want to give readers an action-packed, exciting story with characters they can root for, while also giving them tough issues to chew on. I’d like to make them feel as if the world of zeroboxing is real, and to recognize how much it reflects our own present day society.

I am a huge fan of Science Fiction, what are some of your favorites and influences?

Issac Asimov was a big influence for me early on, but I think Michael Crichton really had a huge impact on me by writing science fiction that was gripping, thrilling, action-packed, accessible, and that captured the imagination of people who don’t self-identify as science fiction readers. Outside of science fiction, Neil Gaiman is one of the writers I most admire.

If a teen came and asked you to recommend 1 classic science fiction title to read, what title would you suggest?

If we’re going with classics, then the best YA introduction to science fiction still has to be Enders Game by Orson Scott Card. More recent books though, would include: House of the Scorpion by Nancy Farmer, Feed by MT Anderson, and Ship Breaker by Paolo Bacigalupi.

Your book also deals in part with marketing and sports figures as brands. How did this come about? Were there any specific people or campaigns that made you think about leaning in this direction?

I worked in corporate strategy at Nike for several years, so that experience definitely filtered into Zeroboxer. In fact, part of the inspiration for the book came about when I was in a meeting with LeBron James. LeBron was twenty-one or twenty-two years old at the time, and I remember thinking how young he was to have so much attention, money, and expectations attached to him. I started imagining a young athlete competing in a future when the entire planet was rooting for him, and the story of Zeroboxer began to come together.

What have been some of your favorite reactions from teen readers?

My favorite has to be when an eighth grade teacher told me that some of his students were writing Zeroboxer fanfiction. That’s the best response any author could ask for: for readers to feel enough of a connection to the story and characters to want to write more themselves.

What did you read as a teen?

Naturally, I read a lot of science fiction and fantasy. A Wrinkle in Time is one of my all time favorite books from when I was young. John Christopher’s Tripod Trilogy. Lloyd’s Alexander’s Chronicles of Prydain. Anne McCaffrey’s Dragonriders of Pern series. Issac Asimov’s robot series. Piers Anthony’s Xanth series. I could go on. I read a lot.

The Giveaway

Author Fonda Lee is generously giving away a signed copy of Zeroboxer to 1 lucky resident of North America. You can enter to win in a variety of ways by doing the Rafflecopter thingy. Giveaway is open until Saturday, December 13th.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

About Author Fonda Lee

Fonda Lee is the author of the novel Zeroboxer (Flux/Llewellyn, April 2015). A recovering corporate strategist, when she is not writing, she can be found training in kung fu or searching out tasty breakfasts. Born and raised in Canada, Fonda now lives in Portland, Oregon. You can find Fonda at www.fondalee.com and on Twitter @fondajlee.

If You Like . . .

Zeroboxer by Fonda Lee and Tracked by Jenny Martin are a one-two punch of high-octane science fiction thrillers that teen readers will enjoy.