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12 Blogs of 2014: YA Highway

Welcome to blog number 11 of our 12 Blogs of 2014! If you missed some of the series, make sure you go back and check them all out. Lots of great blogs to read and smart people to follow on Twitter. Be sure to check out the end of this post for a list of just a few more blogs I love. Want to share your favorites with me? I’m on Twitter @CiteSomething. 

 

Today’s featured blog

YA Highway

From the blog:

We’re writers from different corners of the globe, united by our affinity for travel, costume parties, and writing and reading young adult fiction.

Find them on Twitter  @yahighway and tumblr.

 

Who runs YA Highway

7 full-time and 6 contributing members

Full-timers

Kirsten Hubbard (Twitter @kirstenhubbard), Kristin Halbrook (Twitter @KristinHalbrookWebsite), Kaitlin Ward (Twitter @Kaitlin_WardWebsite), Kate Hart (Twitter @Kate_Hart, Website), Stephanie Kuehn (Twitter @stephkuehnWebsite), Sarah Enni (Twitter @SarahEnniWebsite), Amy Lukavics (Twitter @amylukavicsTumblr)

 

Contributors

Lee Bross (Twitter @Lee_BrossWebsite), Leila Austin (Twitter @thatleilaWebsite), Sumayyah Daud (Twitter @sumayyahdaud, Tumblr), Debra Driza (Twitter @DebraDrizaWebsite), Emilia Plater (Twitter @emiliaplaterWebsite), Kristin Briana Otts (Twitter @kbotts,Tumblr)

 

Why I like YA Highway

Such a wide range of awesome posts! Information, discussions, and advice from writers, editors, agents, and publishers (including a query series), author interviews, recommended reads, writing tips, cover reveals, and more. I love that they include ways to join in on their fun: “submit a collection of music for a mix tape/playlist, ask them YA-related questions, guest posts, Road Trip Wednesday (Answer the weekly prompt on your blog and link it in the comments, or use hashtag #roadtripwednesday on Twitter or Tumblr. (It’s helpful if you tag @yahighway in those as well!) We’ll do our best to share your answers and help you find other people playing along!) and Field Trip Friday (Use the form on their site to submit your links and giveaways below for inclusion in the weekly industry round up.)”

 

Some posts to check out

The Landscape of YA Lit: A State of the Union

Five Ways to Stay in Touch with Your WIP During Busy Times

 YA Before YA: What My Parents Read

Guest post: I Love You and I Want to Kill You; Let’s Make Out by Catherine Egan

Guest post: Memorable Food in YA Literature by Elissa Sussman

 

Other great blogs you need to be reading: Kristin Cashore’s blog, Stacked, Forever Young Adult, Carrie Mesrobian’s blog, A Chair, a Fireplace, & A Tea Cozy, Bookshelves of Doom, GayYA, Kelly Barnhill’s blog, Screwy Decimal, The Dead Have Issues, The Diary Project.

You can find me also blogging at Cite Something

 

12 Blogs of 2014: Rich in Color

Did I mention that choosing just three blogs to share has been agonizing? There are just so many awesome blogs out there and I want to tell you about all of them! I hope you’re adding all of the blogs we’re featuring to whatever blog reader you use and following the blogs and their creators on Twitter. I’m always looking for more blogs to read, so make sure you share your favorites with us, too! You can find me on Twitter @CiteSomething. 

Today’s featured blog

Rich in Color

From the blog:

Rich in Color is dedicated to reading, reviewing, talking about, and otherwise promoting young adult fiction starring people of color or written by people of color. We believe that teens (and adults!) should be able to find themselves in the kinds of books they love to read. At Rich in Color, we want to showcase a wide variety of multicultural books so that kids will be able to see themselves as more than just the sassy best friend, the very special lesson, or the extra in the background.

The discrepancy between books that feature people of color or are written by people of color and the actual composition of the U.S. population is a concern for us. We think it’s important to support these books/authors, and one way we can do that is to talk about them.

Find the blog on Twitter @Rich_in_Color and check out their tumblr.

 

Who runs it

Audrey, an editor and copywriter (Twitter @audrey_gonzalezMy Writing Life); Crystal, an elementary school teacher and librarian (Twitter @librarygrl2Reading Through Life ); Jessica, a bookworm to the core (These Mortals Be); K. Imani Tennyson, a teacher and writer (Twitter @K_ImaniImani Scribbles); Jon, a writer and the site’s webmaster (Twitter @jayang, Website)

 

Why I like Rich in Color

Extensive information on YA books featuring characters of color and authors of color. A handy reference with their release calendar. Reviews, booklists, topical posts, roundups of new releases, links to diverse resources, and so much more.

 

Some posts to check out

 Finding Diverse Lit

Shorter Days Equal Shorter Stories

 The Thorny Issue of Race

Getting Graphic

Five YA Books Featuring American Indians

#BlackLivesMatter

 

 

12 Blogs of 2014: DiversifYA

Choosing just three blogs to feature for our 12 Blogs of 2014 was hard. I may have sent Karen, Robin, and Heather about 15 emails constantly changing which blogs I was calling dibs on. I hope you’re adding all of the blogs we’re featuring to whatever blog reader you use and following the blogs and their creators on Twitter. I’m always looking for more blogs to read, so make sure you share your favorites with us, too! You can find me on Twitter @CiteSomething. 

 

Today’s featured blog

DiversifYA

The focus of DiversifYA is on being inclusive in every possible way.

From the blog:

DiversifYA is a collection of interviews that allows us to share our stories, all of us. All sorts of diversity and all marginalized experiences. We are not Other.

DiversifYA is a tool, an introduction. Allow us to convince you that the world is so much richer than the world we often read about, and that every reader deserves to find themselves in books.

DiversifYA is our way to show you: diversity is all of us. Diversity is reality. We all have shared experiences, no matter how different we may be, and the countless combinations of sameness and difference is what makes this world amazing. It’s about time more stories reflected that.

Follow the blog on Twitter  @_DiversifYA

(Note: this blog is on a hiatus until January rolls around.)

 

Who runs DiversifYA

The DiversifYA team currently consists of Marieke and Sarah, with former co-moderator Alex as honorary team member!

Marieke is VP of We Need Diverse Books™. You can follow Marieke on Twitter @mariekeyn and visit her website.

Sarah’s debut, THE LAST LEAVES FALLING, releases from Random House UK and Simon and Schuster US in Spring 2015. On Twitter she’s @SWritesBooks.

 

Why I like this blog

DiversifYA features interviews, guest posts, cover reveals, in-depth looks at books, issues, and themes. With their DiversiTheme category, they examine various issues with writing diversity. From their blog: “For example, over the next couple of months we’ll have topics as writing/publishing diverse lit and living in different cultures. We’re talking about body imagine and fat culture, which is an integral part of diversity as well.” The blog also features roundtable discussions. The discussion they had last year was a 6-part series about diversity and sexuality. I hope they do more, because that one was great! When you hop on over to their blog, check out the bevvy of tags they have for their posts (in the column on the right). Some examples: Neurodiversity, asexual, hearing loss, QUILTBAG, Eskimo, OCD, bulimia, and so lots more topics. The posts are smart and touch on so many topics that more people need to be thinking about and writing about. As they say on the blog, “[DivesifYA is not] an alternative to research. DiversifYA is an introduction to diversity, it’s not a collection of premade character bios you can use. It is not a substitute for research. But don’t mind us if we want to nudge you in the right direction.”

 

Some posts to check out

Interview with Sabaa Tahir

 Ami Allen-Vath’s guest post about bulimia

 Julie Sondra Decker’s post about asexuality

DivYAQnA: disability edition

 Interview with Sumayyah Daud

 

12 Blogs of TLT: Terrible Trivium

If you haven’t noticed my intellectual crush on Anne Ursu by now, you haven’t been paying attention. Terrible Trivium is Anne Ursu’s Tumblr account and it is a resource for an amazing amount of thoughtful critique on issues that are close to my heart, including literature for children of all ages, book publishing, and many societal concerns. Anne’s writing here doesn’t just make me think, it makes me want to think more deeply. And oh, how I’d love to be able to express my thoughts as clearly and articulately as she does. And be as open and honest as she is.

Please read her thoughts on a book for children called Don’t Call me Fat, and tell me that it is not the most eloquent explanation ever of the damage we do to ourselves and our children as a culture by making people feel bad about their bodies. Read her response to the vast number of ill-informed popular articles about YA literature and how it is ruining us, and tell me you do not want to stand and cheer. My favorite part of that last post:

We do not fear childishness, and so we write for children. We write with intention. We write with awareness. We write with artistry. And sometimes we write about girls. And in this culture, as the essays above prove, writing about girls is a political act.

Anne Ursu, I am in love with your brain. Please accept this most humble blog post as a token of my love. ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥

Here’s a Recap of the 12 Blogs of 2014 To Date:

R. David Lankes

A Chair, A Fireplace & A Teacozy

Whatever

Two Bossy Dames

Fat Girl Reading

Mary Had a Little Book Blog

The Mary Sue

You can find the 12 Blogs from 2011, 2012 and 2013 Here