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Inside Teen Librarian Toolbox

Take 5: Time Travel and Teens, featuring INVICTUS by Ryan Graudin

We are HUGE Doctor Who fans in my house, and many of my teens are as well. So I’m always excited to read a new Time Travel book. So today I am going to review Invictus by Ryan Graudin and share with you a few of my other favorite time travel books for lovers of Doctor Who (or anyone really).

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Invictus by Ryan Graudin

timetravels1Publisher’s Book Description

Time flies when you’re plundering history.

Farway Gaius McCarthy was born outside of time. The son of a time-traveling Recorder from 2354 AD and a gladiator living in Rome in 95 AD, Far’s birth defies the laws of nature. Exploring history himself is all he’s ever wanted, and after failing his final time-traveling exam, Far takes a position commanding a ship with a crew of his friends as part of a black market operation to steal valuables from the past.

But during a heist on the sinking Titanic, Far meets a mysterious girl who always seems to be one step ahead of him. Armed with knowledge that will bring Far’s very existence into question, she will lead Far and his team on a race through time to discover a frightening truth: History is not as steady as it seems.

Coming September 26, 2017 from Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

Karen’s Thoughts

This is a fantastic book: Exciting, twisty and compelling. Just when I thought to myself, yeah but why does the adventurous time traveler have to be a dude, Graudin inserts some new twists. In fact, this is far more than a time travel book but I can’t tell you why because then it would spoil everything which would make you hate me because where this novel goes is really interesting and fresh. There is also great characterization and growth. On top of all of that, there are some really good relationships here which I appreciated. This is a must buy and read.

The Girl from Everywhere by Heidi Heilig

timetravels2Publisher’s Book Description

Nix has spent her entire life aboard her father’s ship, sailing across the centuries, across the world, across myth and imagination.

As long as her father has a map for it, he can sail to any time, any place, real or imagined: nineteenth-century China, the land from One Thousand and One Nights, a mythic version of Africa. Along the way they have found crewmates and friends, and even a disarming thief who could come to mean much more to Nix.

But the end to it all looms closer every day.

Her father is obsessed with obtaining the one map, 1868 Honolulu, that could take him back to his lost love, Nix’s mother. Even though getting it—and going there—could erase Nix’s very existence.

For the first time, Nix is entering unknown waters.

She could find herself, find her family, find her own fantastical ability, her own epic love.

Or she could disappear.

Karen’s Thoughts

This is such a great series. That’s right, it’s the first book in a series so there is more than one book to keep you traveling in time.

Hourglass by Myra McEntire

timetravels3Publisher’s Book Description

One hour to rewrite the past…

For seventeen-year-old Emerson Cole, life is about seeing what isn’t there: swooning Southern Belles; soldiers long forgotten; a haunting jazz trio that vanishes in an instant. Plagued by phantoms since her parents’ death, she just wants the apparitions to stop so she can be normal. She’s tried everything, but the visions keep coming back.

So when her well-meaning brother brings in a consultant from a secretive organization called the Hourglass, Emerson’s willing to try one last cure. But meeting Michael Weaver may not only change her future, it may also change her past.

Who is this dark, mysterious, sympathetic guy, barely older than Emerson herself, who seems to believe every crazy word she says? Why does an electric charge seem to run through the room whenever he’s around? And why is he so insistent that he needs her help to prevent a death that never should’ve happened?

Karen’s Thoughts

Honestly, I will take any chance I can to recommend this book series. If you haven’t read it yet, I highly recommend it.

Passenger by Alexandra Bracken

timetravels4Publisher’s Book Description

Passage, n.
i. A brief section of music composed of a series of notes and flourishes.
ii. A journey by water; a voyage.
iii. The transition from one place to another, across space and time.

In one devastating night, violin prodigy Etta Spencer loses everything she knows and loves. Thrust into an unfamiliar world by a stranger with a dangerous agenda, Etta is certain of only one thing: she has traveled not just miles but years from home. And she’s inherited a legacy she knows nothing about from a family whose existence she’s never heard of. Until now.

Nicholas Carter is content with his life at sea, free from the Ironwoods—a powerful family in the colonies—and the servitude he’s known at their hands. But with the arrival of an unusual passenger on his ship comes the insistent pull of the past that he can’t escape and the family that won’t let him go so easily. Now the Ironwoods are searching for a stolen object of untold value, one they believe only Etta, Nicholas’ passenger, can find. In order to protect her, he must ensure she brings it back to them—whether she wants to or not.

Together, Etta and Nicholas embark on a perilous journey across centuries and continents, piecing together clues left behind by the traveler who will do anything to keep the object out of the Ironwoods’ grasp. But as they get closer to the truth of their search, and the deadly game the Ironwoods are playing, treacherous forces threaten to separate Etta not only from Nicholas but from her path home… forever.

Karen’s Thoughts

This is another great series that time travel fans will love.

Cold Summer by Gwen Cole

timetravels5Publisher’s Book Description

Today, he’s a high school dropout with no future.
Tomorrow, he’s a soldier in World War II.

Kale Jackson has spent years trying to control his time-traveling ability but hasn’t had much luck. One day he lives in 1945, fighting in the war as a sharpshooter and helplessly watching soldiers—friends—die. Then the next day, he’s back in the present, where WWII has bled into his modern life in the form of PTSD, straining his relationship with his father and the few friends he has left. Every day it becomes harder to hide his battle wounds, both physical and mental, from the past.

When the ex-girl-next-door, Harper, moves back to town, thoughts of what could be if only he had a normal life begin to haunt him. Harper reminds him of the person he was before the PTSD, which helps anchor him to the present. With practice, maybe Kale could remain in the present permanently and never step foot on a battlefield again. Maybe he can have the normal life he craves.

But then Harper finds Kale’s name in a historical article—and he’s listed as a casualty of the war. Kale knows now that he must learn to control his time-traveling ability to save himself and his chance at a life with Harper. Otherwise, he’ll be killed in a time where he doesn’t belong by a bullet that was never meant for him.

Karen’s Thoughts

I haven’t read this one yet but Eric Smith recommends it and that’s good enough for me.

And a Bonus Title . . .

If you can, be sure and get your hands on the much older YA title MR. WAS by Pete Hautman.

mrwasJack Lund figures a good day is when his dad’s too drunk to beat up his mom.

For Jack, Bogg’s End is the end. The end of the turbulent, see-saw years of watching his father go on the wagon and fall right back off gain. Once it took two years, but the inevitable inevitably happened. Now it’s just Jack and his mom starting over in the strange old house his grandfather left them.

But the ride’s not over yet. Jack’s father returns, full of apologies and promises, and for a little while, things are looking up. Then in one terrifying, sickening moment, everything comes crashing back down again.

So Jack runs. He runs through a strange hidden door that takes him back in time to before his parents were born. Before he was born. Maybe with a second chance he can stop the inevitable. At least he’s got to try. What Jack doesn’t understand, though, is that he can’t change his future until he faces his past.

More Time Travel YA Lists

Book Review: At the Edge of the Universe by Shaun David Hutchinson

Publisher’s description

at-the-edgeFrom the author of We Are the Ants and The Five Stages of Andrew Brawley comes the heartbreaking story of a boy who believes the universe is slowly shrinking as things he remembers are being erased from others’ memories.

Tommy and Ozzie have been best friends since the second grade, and boyfriends since eighth. They spent countless days dreaming of escaping their small town—and then Tommy vanished.

More accurately, he ceased to exist, erased from the minds and memories of everyone who knew him. Everyone except Ozzie.

Ozzie doesn’t know how to navigate life without Tommy, and soon he suspects that something else is going on: that the universe is shrinking.

When Ozzie is paired up with new student Calvin on a physics project, he begins to wonder if Calvin could somehow be involved. But the more time they spend together, the harder it is for him to deny the feelings developing between them, even if he still loves Tommy.

But Ozzie knows there isn’t much time left to find Tommy—that once the door closes, it can’t be opened again. And he’s determined to keep it open as long as it takes to get his boyfriend back.

 

Amanda’s thoughts

It’s a well-established fact that I love everything Shaun David Hutchinson writes. I make myself read through my TBR pile in order of publication date, or I’d never be able to keep any kind of handle on it, but knowing this book was sitting there for months was taunting me. I burned through this and when I was done, all I could think about was how jealous I was of all the grad students who will enjoy sitting down to write long papers on the common ideas and symbols in Hutchinson’s brilliant books.

 

Ozzie’s boyfriend Tommy disappeared a few months ago. He didn’t run away—he literally disappeared. No one has any memory of him. But Ozzie remembers everything. He’s determined to wait for Tommy to reappear, even if that means giving up his future to stick around in his small hometown. He’d search for him, but most of Ozzie’s theories about where Tommy went involve quantum physics, so it seems dauntingly impossible to even begin to look for him. Then there’s the whole issue of the universe shrinking. Stars, the sun, the moon—they all disappear. The land beyond Florida disappears. Eventually, everything beyond Ozzie’s small town disappears. No one but Ozzie notices. They can’t. They have no memory of there ever being anything different—no memory of stars, or other states, or space exploration. History rewrites itself to adjust for all these changes. It’s terrifying and depressing. Any chance Ozzie had a creating a life beyond his tiny town is disappearing. Imagine being a teenager whose life has shrunk down to just his high school and the people in his town. Terrifying, indeed.

 

Of course, life goes on, despite these outrageous changes. Despite the many changes in the universe, nothing seems to change the fact that Ozzie’s parents are getting divorced. Or that his brother, Warren, is joining the Army. While he tries to figure out what is happening, Ozzie still hangs out with Lua, his genderfluid rock-star-in-the-making best friend (who goes by whatever pronoun best fits how she is dressed for the day). He still has work at the bookstore (where he repeatedly interacts with Tommy’s mother, who of course has no memory of there ever being a Tommy). Ozzie still has school, where he gets paired up for a project with Calvin, a mysterious and depressed classmate who used to be the king of everything at school. As Ozzie gets to know Calvin, he becomes the keeper of Calvin’s dark secrets and grapples with what to do with this information.

 

Once again, Hutchinson has created an incredibly smart, weird, complex, and deeply affecting look at teenage lives. While they might not spend nearly as much time as Ozzie thinking about quantum physics, most teenagers will be able to relate to the fear and uncertainty that comes with facing a changing and unpredictable future, as well as the claustrophobia of feeling like you have no choices. A mind-bendingly fantastic examination of life, loss, risk, and perception.

 

Review copy courtesy of the publisher and Edelweiss

ISBN-13: 9781481449663

Publisher: Simon Pulse

Publication date: 02/07/2017

2015 Debut Author Bash: Meet ZEROBOXER Author Fonda Lee (and a book giveaway)

2015-debut-authors-bash
Today we are excited to be a part of the 2015 Debut Author Bash hosted by YAReads. You can see the complete schedule here. I was very honored to interview debut author Fonda Lee. Her novel, Zeroboxer, is a Science Fiction thriller set in a futuristic sports arena. Zeroboxing is a weightless combat sport.

 

About ZEROBOXER

zeroboxerA Sci-Fi Thrill Ride Set in the Action-Packed Sports Arena of the Future A rising star in the weightless combat sport of zeroboxing, Carr “the Raptor” Luka dreams of winning the championship title. Recognizing his talent, the Zero Gravity Fighting Association assigns Risha, an ambitious and beautiful Martian colonist, to be his brandhelm––a personal marketing strategist. It isn’t long before she’s made Carr into a popular celebrity and stolen his heart along the way.

As his fame grows, Carr becomes an inspirational hero on Earth, a once-great planet that’s fallen into the shadow of its more prosperous colonies. But when Carr discovers a far-reaching criminal scheme, he becomes the keeper of a devastating secret. Not only will his choices place everything he cares about in jeopardy, but they may also spill the violence from the sports arena into the solar system.

 

The Fonda Lee Interview

Fonda Lee, author of the YA Science Fiction debut Zeroboxer

Fonda Lee, author of the YA Science Fiction debut Zeroboxer

Not book related, but I read online that you are involved in the martial arts. My 13-year-old daughter just got her black belt in Tae Kwon Do. How did you get involved in the martial arts and what has it meant to you? (I’m totally sharing your answer with my daughter)

Besides being a writer, being a martial artist is a core part of my identity. I have a second degree black belt in karate and a black belt in kung fu, which is what I primarily train in these days. I took up martial arts when I was 13 years old (so your daughter already has a leg up on me!). Martial arts is like writing: both require a lot of discipline, perseverance, and relentless focus on improvement of technique. Also like writing, martial arts is something that gets into your blood. Once it’s a part of you, you can’t *not* do it.

Can you tell us a little bit about your journey as a writer?

I’ve wanted to be a writer since I was about ten years old. I wrote a 300 page novel on lined paper while riding the school bus for 45 minutes each way to and from school in fifth grade. I wrote my second in high school during biology class. I wrote fanfiction in college while studying toward… a degree in finance.

After more than a decade of having a practical, lucrative, all consuming career as a corporate strategist, I hit a point where I decided that if I didn’t make time in my life for what I truly wanted to do (write novels) then it wasn’t going to happen. In 2011, I cut back on my work hours dramatically and started writing with the goal of being published. I landed my agent and first book deal at the end of 2013 with the second book I wrote.

How would you describe your book in a 6 Word Sentence?

Zero-gravity prizefighting amid interplanetary conflict.

What would you like for readers to take away from Zeroboxer?

I want to give readers an action-packed, exciting story with characters they can root for, while also giving them tough issues to chew on. I’d like to make them feel as if the world of zeroboxing is real, and to recognize how much it reflects our own present day society.

I am a huge fan of Science Fiction, what are some of your favorites and influences?

Issac Asimov was a big influence for me early on, but I think Michael Crichton really had a huge impact on me by writing science fiction that was gripping, thrilling, action-packed, accessible, and that captured the imagination of people who don’t self-identify as science fiction readers. Outside of science fiction, Neil Gaiman is one of the writers I most admire.

If a teen came and asked you to recommend 1 classic science fiction title to read, what title would you suggest?

If we’re going with classics, then the best YA introduction to science fiction still has to be Enders Game by Orson Scott Card. More recent books though, would include: House of the Scorpion by Nancy Farmer, Feed by MT Anderson, and Ship Breaker by Paolo Bacigalupi.

Your book also deals in part with marketing and sports figures as brands. How did this come about? Were there any specific people or campaigns that made you think about leaning in this direction?

I worked in corporate strategy at Nike for several years, so that experience definitely filtered into Zeroboxer. In fact, part of the inspiration for the book came about when I was in a meeting with LeBron James. LeBron was twenty-one or twenty-two years old at the time, and I remember thinking how young he was to have so much attention, money, and expectations attached to him. I started imagining a young athlete competing in a future when the entire planet was rooting for him, and the story of Zeroboxer began to come together.

What have been some of your favorite reactions from teen readers?

My favorite has to be when an eighth grade teacher told me that some of his students were writing Zeroboxer fanfiction. That’s the best response any author could ask for: for readers to feel enough of a connection to the story and characters to want to write more themselves.

What did you read as a teen?

Naturally, I read a lot of science fiction and fantasy. A Wrinkle in Time is one of my all time favorite books from when I was young. John Christopher’s Tripod Trilogy. Lloyd’s Alexander’s Chronicles of Prydain. Anne McCaffrey’s Dragonriders of Pern series. Issac Asimov’s robot series. Piers Anthony’s Xanth series. I could go on. I read a lot.

The Giveaway

Author Fonda Lee is generously giving away a signed copy of Zeroboxer to 1 lucky resident of North America. You can enter to win in a variety of ways by doing the Rafflecopter thingy. Giveaway is open until Saturday, December 13th.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

About Author Fonda Lee

Fonda Lee is the author of the novel Zeroboxer (Flux/Llewellyn, April 2015). A recovering corporate strategist, when she is not writing, she can be found training in kung fu or searching out tasty breakfasts. Born and raised in Canada, Fonda now lives in Portland, Oregon. You can find Fonda at www.fondalee.com and on Twitter @fondajlee.

If You Like . . .

Zeroboxer by Fonda Lee and Tracked by Jenny Martin are a one-two punch of high-octane science fiction thrillers that teen readers will enjoy.